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Jackson Hole Sidecountry POV Video - Just for Fun

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

We missed another snowstorm that was forecast for the last couple of days, so I'm sitting around wishing winter would get here.  

 

I got an email from one of the JH backcountry guides asking for the url of a video I put together from a day I skied with them last January. That led to me watching it again.

 

Since nobody on Epic is doing much skiing right now, maybe this will help you get in the mood.  

 

 

It was a very fun day.

post #2 of 18

Awsome!

post #3 of 18

Very nice, love the little sluffs in lower Why Not.

 

Looks like that was one of Ned's first days on his Atomic Atlases.  I sold them to him.

 

Can't wait to do that soon.

post #4 of 18

Amazing!  I remember that day!

 

Well Done!

post #5 of 18

Nice stoke!

post #6 of 18

Nice... I've got to get out to JH soon.

post #7 of 18

I just watched that video on my HD Tv threw my appletv box. Wow if you haven't watched on a big screen HD you are missing something. Very good Bob.

Thanks

post #8 of 18

I actually did get to ski last weekend, and now I'm more fired up than ever. That has got to be one of the nicest clips I've seen. If that doesn't get you stoked then you better check your pulse to make sure you have one.

post #9 of 18

Real nice video.  My copy of the Jackson Hole Ski Atlas arrived in the mail today and this was a very topical post and video.  What a beautiful day you had and i too watched it on my HDTV.

 

 Never been so the more info the better.  Your guide on Epic is the best I have ever seen online to a Resort-my thanks added to many others.  Will be following http://www.jhavalanche.org/index.php throughout the season.  Just doing one big ski vacation a year this helps to stretch out the enjoyment.

 

Question: that shot just out the gates, does it get hit all season long to set up the snow pack?  Is it typically a fairly avy safe zone or was that day an exceptionally good day?   Reason I ask is you folks seemed real confident in the snow pack with how close you were skiing.

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post

Real nice video.  My copy of the Jackson Hole Ski Atlas arrived in the mail today and this was a very topical post and video.  What a beautiful day you had and i too watched it on my HDTV.

 

 Never been so the more info the better.  Your guide on Epic is the best I have ever seen online to a Resort-my thanks added to many others.  Will be following http://www.jhavalanche.org/index.php throughout the season.  Just doing one big ski vacation a year this helps to stretch out the enjoyment.

 

Question: that shot just out the gates, does it get hit all season long to set up the snow pack?  Is it typically a fairly avy safe zone or was that day an exceptionally good day?   Reason I ask is you folks seemed real confident in the snow pack with how close you were skiing.


Hi, Maineac.

 

Thanks for the nice compliment on the video.  I obviously had fun making it. wink.gif

 

It's very hard to answer your question with a simple reply.  It does get skied pretty much all season long and we definitely WERE very confident about skiing it in the new snow.  Problem is, that confidence only applied to that particular time on that particular day.  It was a cold morning that led into a pretty warm afternoon.  If we had been coming into that slope a couple of hours later, I doubt that our guide (or I) would have felt anywhere near as certain about the conditions.  That aspect gets a lot of sun later in the day, and I would have been very reluctant to ski it later on with major sun and that much new snow.

 

The reason I'm waffling so much is that we had an exceptionally safe snowpack last year.  There were very few storms that created serious slab conditions so there were very few times that things felt significantly "dangerous".  We weren't horribly concerned about subsurface slabs most of the winter.

 

That said, the slope we were on is definitely an avalanche run, as shown not only by the sluffs that I'm creating while skiing but also by the very plain sluff lines you can see just under the snow surface downhill of me as I get lower on that line.  That is a dangerous slope in the wrong conditions and I really, really hesitate to recommend that anyone ski it without a fair amount of local knowledge.  

 

It was our guide's decision to ski that slope the way we did, but since I also spent several winters as a guide in that same area, I agreed completely with the decision.  As I said, though, I doubt that our guide would have brought us there two hours later and let us ski it all together.  I know I wouldn't have.

 

I know that's a pretty wishy-washy answer, but that's the best I can do.   

 

post #11 of 18

Fun video to watch - and so rock solid steady.  Does the camera have an anti-vibration function, or are you just that smooth?  smile.gif

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post

Fun video to watch - and so rock solid steady.  Does the camera have an anti-vibration function, or are you just that smooth?  smile.gif


Ha!

 

Why.... of COURSE I'm that smooth. biggrin.gif

 

I have to say, the sequence on Rendezvous Bowl that starts at .44 has to be about the smoothest snow you'll ever see on Rendezvous Bowl.

 

I think the camera must have some kind of anti-vibration algorithm built into it.  It's a GoPro Hero 720 (I think).  I'm pretty sure they must have something in there to make the images more steady.  Maybe somebody else knows more than I do (that's a pretty safe assumption).

 

The snow was incredibly smooth except for that tree branch I whacked at 2:13.  That thing was SOLID.  It practically knocked me over and the GoPro took the direct hit.  I still can't believe that the mount/camera survived.

post #13 of 18

Most POV cams have the same anti-shake technology that Sony came out with years ago with the steady cam.   Of course, smooth skiing doesn't hurt.  :)

post #14 of 18

No worries about the wishy washy-how can a definitive answer be given?  You certainly gave a tremendous amount of detail and it is greatly appreciated.  I did notice the sluff you were kicking off early on and the sluff lines lower down.  I know you from your posts to be a pragmatic skier who ways choices and the group ski was what caught me by surprise and elicited my question.

 

Given the amount I assume the backcountry gets hit up around Jackson, I have been surprised by the lack of a current published guide to the area or more information on line.  I do appreciate Steve's work at http://www.tetonat.com/teton-descents/, but there does not seem to be a whole lot more.  Is that because between the guides and the locals it is an unspoken agreement to keep it quiet?  Or maybe I have not found what I am looking for.

 

Thanks again for your thoughts as it is much appreciated local knowledge.

 

Lee

post #15 of 18



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post


Ha!

 

Why.... of COURSE I'm that smooth. biggrin.gif

 

I have to say, the sequence on Rendezvous Bowl that starts at .44 has to be about the smoothest snow you'll ever see on Rendezvous Bowl.

 

I think the camera must have some kind of anti-vibration algorithm built into it.  It's a GoPro Hero 720 (I think).  I'm pretty sure they must have something in there to make the images more steady.  Maybe somebody else knows more than I do (that's a pretty safe assumption).

 

The snow was incredibly smooth except for that tree branch I whacked at 2:13.  That thing was SOLID.  It practically knocked me over and the GoPro took the direct hit.  I still can't believe that the mount/camera survived.


smooth_johnson.jpg  Smoother than Smooth Johnson?  Probably.  PM'ed you this morning.

 


 

 


Edited by SpikeDog - 11/2/11 at 7:33am
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post

No worries about the wishy washy-how can a definitive answer be given?  You certainly gave a tremendous amount of detail and it is greatly appreciated.  I did notice the sluff you were kicking off early on and the sluff lines lower down.  I know you from your posts to be a pragmatic skier who ways choices and the group ski was what caught me by surprise and elicited my question.

 

Given the amount I assume the backcountry gets hit up around Jackson, I have been surprised by the lack of a current published guide to the area or more information on line.  I do appreciate Steve's work at http://www.tetonat.com/teton-descents/, but there does not seem to be a whole lot more.  Is that because between the guides and the locals it is an unspoken agreement to keep it quiet?  Or maybe I have not found what I am looking for.

 

Thanks again for your thoughts as it is much appreciated local knowledge.

 

Lee

 

Hi, Lee.

 

I'll propose a bit of an alternative...

 

I don't think it's an unspoken agreement to keep it quiet, I think it's an oft-spoken concern that publicizing directions on how to get to various out-of-bounds skiing at JHMR has the potential to encourage people to get themselves into terrain and conditions that they're unprepared for.  I honestly think it's not so much a conspiracy to keep the goods to ourselves or "force" visitors to hire guides, it's an honest belief that there's a lot of potential danger out there and it's better if newbies learn it in bits and pieces by gradually experimenting and learning the terrain the old-fashioned way - by going there yourself..

 

There are a lot of sidecountry routes that are VERY accessible from the gates at JHMR where going past the right tree and underneath a certain rock will take you to a good, clean line that can be safely skied.  Going just a little bit off that same course, however, could leave you cliffed-out in extremely exposed terrain.  The open routes, on the other hand, are usually open because they're avalanche tracks and encouraging someone to go ski those without some solid knowledge of the immediate snow conditions is also pretty foolhardy.  There's no way to put  that level of detail into a backcountry guide book.

 

You're probably aware of the Jackson Hole Ski Atlas.  That's the closest thing that I know of to a guidebook showing where stuff is.  If you want to ski Jackson Hole backcountry, it's considered the Bible around here.  It won't tell you exactly how to find Once Is Enough couloir or Connie's Knob, etc, but it does show the drainages, peaks, names, etc all through the valley. If you don't have one and want to add to your backcountry knowledge ahead of a trip to Jackson Hole, I would highly recommend it.

 

I love author Angus Theurmer, Jr.'s multi-layered disclaimers (in red below):

 

 

This site only shows a few of the 38 ultra-high resolution photos as featured in the full-size 10 " x 10 " print version that reveals the subtle nuances of the Teton backcountry. Terrain in the new expanded edition includes addtional Teton Pass, Jackson Hole Mountain Resort O.B., Grand Targhee Resort O.B. and Grand Teton National Park explorations. Purchase at your favorite local sporting-goods store for only $19.95.
 
___________
 
Skiing is a dangerous sport. People who ski subject themselves to risks of avalanches, extreme weather and other perils. Avalanches have killed people on ski slopes depicted in this book. The area is notorious for winter storms. Each individual must assume these risks.
 
Backcountry travelers must use common sense and follow established safety practices. They should venture with a partner, leave word of route and expected time of return, and pay attention to the weather and the avalanche report at 307-733-2664 or jhavalanche.org to understand current conditions before departing. It is necessary to carry a map, compass, lighter, extra clothing, food and water, and other safety gear.
 
This is not a quidebook or an avalanche index. The authors and publisher are not responsible for injury or death resulting from excursions into country shown in these photographs. Terrain depicted in these photographs is under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service and private parties, each of which has its own regulations. U.S. Board of Geographic Names' style has been retained for features named on U.S.G.S. topographic maps. Possessives are used in vernacular names.
 
Photographs by Angus M. Thuermer, Jr., with John Wright, Michelle Bevier McCormick and Linda Sternberg.

 

 

post #17 of 18

Thanks again Bob.  I have noticed the nature of the mountains out that way leads to a whole bunch of cliffed out situations.

 

I do have the Jackson Hole Atlas-actually mentioned it in my first post in this thread as it arrived yesterday at the same time I saw your video.

 

Cheers,

Lee

post #18 of 18

I believe that Bobs' guide that day was Tom Turino.  Tom did publish a guide book many years ago that was very thorough about skiing in the Tetons.  It's been out of print for years and I can't find my copy.  I remember that he was actively writing it the first time I met him.  I was dating one of his roommates and part of the house was completely taken over by maps and notes and piles of paper related to the book project.  It might still be available as a used copy if someone looked.

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