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Is my ski big enough for powder? - Page 4

post #91 of 113

Why is there an assumption that he is in shit boots and needs new ones. This was NEVER communicated at any point by the OP?

 

You sound like a bunch of parrots sqwaking the easiest thing you can get out of your mouths.

post #92 of 113

If you read the posts about boots, there was never an assumption of shit boots, I even asked what the OP was in and the flex. What most of us have learned is that having properly fitted boots with the proper flex will do more to improve powder skiing (along with technique) than any ski will. And yes, this has still not been communicated, that is why people are still asking.

 

The easiest thing is to do like everybody else and tell him to get wider skis, that may actually hinder him in the long run.

 

Spacecase

 

 

post #93 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post


I'd much prefer to climb the stairs.

 



Stairs are cool for a bit, but I start to lose interest after a few flights.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

Whoa, looks like you euro-guys are way behind the curve.  I see plenty of people on wide skis who are not what I would consider good.  Despite all the BS from the ski industry, new wide skis with the latest "fliprockercut" technology won't make you a good skier.  

 

 

 

What I said was that, of the small number of skiers I have seen in the Alps using wide skis, none of them were bad skiers. They all happened to be good skiers who were using a particular tool for a particular type of job. And from what I could tell, they all seemed quite happy with the results, and that includes the guides.

 

I never said fat skis will make you a good skier. They won't, and neither will short, narrow skis with very aggressive sidecuts. A bad skier is a bad skier regardless of the equipment he/she is on. It just happens that the bad skiers around here are still riding carvers and trying to race around on the groomers. I'm sure things will change as powder becomes more trendy here.

post #94 of 113

we must be really eagerly awaiting snow cuz this thread is like a pack of wild dogs circling around the dying hippo. snow snow snow snowfalling.gifsnowfalling.gifsnowfalling.gif

post #95 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spacecase View Post

If you read the posts about boots, there was never an assumption of shit boots, I even asked what the OP was in and the flex. What most of us have learned is that having properly fitted boots with the proper flex will do more to improve powder skiing (along with technique) than any ski will. And yes, this has still not been communicated, that is why people are still asking.

 

The easiest thing is to do like everybody else and tell him to get wider skis, that may actually hinder him in the long run.

 

Spacecase

 

 


Yep. Also getting boots that fit right takes time and a bit of effort to ask for what you want. Getting the wrong boot is easy. Its perfectly reasonable to assume in absence of any contrary information that the OP is like every other beginner I have ever seen, skiing in ill fitting boots.

 

You can only inhibi it progressioni in someone who is actually progressing or trying to progress their skiing. OP said he has not and is not going to take a lesson. IMO, There is nothing to hinder.

 

post #96 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post



Stairs are cool for a bit, but I start to lose interest after a few flights.


Maybe you didn't go high enough. What's the tallest building you've climbed? When I lived in an eighteen story building I used to run laps up and down the stairs enough times to equal the Empire State Building.

post #97 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post


Maybe you didn't go high enough. What's the tallest building you've climbed? When I lived in an eighteen story building I used to run laps up and down the stairs enough times to equal the Empire State Building.



I lived in an apartment building in DC that had 12 or 13 stories. I ran those a few times when the weather outside wasn't so nice. It got a bit boring by the time I got to the top.

 

post #98 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

Why is there an assumption that he is in shit boots and needs new ones. This was NEVER communicated at any point by the OP?

 



Because he most likely is, unless he has been truly lucky to buy his boots at a proper place. It is unlikely for a guy who skis occasionally and just got to try powder for the first time at Heavenly. And that was on a season when every second day was a powder day. I think the shit boots assumption is justified.


You sound like a bunch of parrots sqwaking the easiest thing you can get out of your mouths.


Yeah, what else can we do here?
post #99 of 113

I was on Boston a little over two years ago.  My kids and I climbed the Bunker Hill Monument.  It didn't look like much from the outside, but the 294 oversized circular steps are surprisingly grueling on a hot August day.  There was a guy puking out the little window about half way updrool.gif  My 6 and 7 year olds made it to the top with me just fine though.  As we got to the bottom I noticed the lawn was spattered with people sprawled out in agony all over the place.  My quads were in spasms as we made the downhill trek to the car afterwards..

post #100 of 113

hijack2.gif

post #101 of 113
Thread Starter 

Thanks to everyone for all the help and replies. Never expected to receive this much input. I checked my boots and i am quite disappointed. They have two flex settings, seldom a good sign, and the highest is 85 :( I will not be investing in new skis or boots this winter but instead i am going to try and focus on improving my skills with familiar gear. I was wondering if anyone had advice for skiing in the trees and general slower skiing in pow. I dont want to have to start going faster than i feel comfortable with just to get a good amount of float but with my skill level being low im not sure i have much other choice at the time. Any tips or advice on jump turns? i heard that might be a good solution for getting turned in heavy powder at slower speeds when i cant float quite as well.

post #102 of 113
Thread Starter 

Just wanted to add real quick that my mondo ski boot size is 32. There are only 2-3 performance/high performance ski boots i believe that they make in my size 

post #103 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I was on Boston a little over two years ago.  My kids and I climbed the Bunker Hill Monument.  It didn't look like much from the outside, but the 294 oversized circular steps are surprisingly grueling on a hot August day.  There was a guy puking out the little window about half way updrool.gif  My 6 and 7 year olds made it to the top with me just fine though.  As we got to the bottom I noticed the lawn was spattered with people sprawled out in agony all over the place.  My quads were in spasms as we made the downhill trek to the car afterwards..


My sister lived across the street from that monument in Cambridge for a short time but I never climbed it. 

post #104 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylar Goodwin View Post

Thanks to everyone for all the help and replies. Never expected to receive this much input. I checked my boots and i am quite disappointed. They have two flex settings, seldom a good sign, and the highest is 85 :( I will not be investing in new skis or boots this winter but instead i am going to try and focus on improving my skills with familiar gear. I was wondering if anyone had advice for skiing in the trees and general slower skiing in pow. I dont want to have to start going faster than i feel comfortable with just to get a good amount of float but with my skill level being low im not sure i have much other choice at the time. Any tips or advice on jump turns? i heard that might be a good solution for getting turned in heavy powder at slower speeds when i cant float quite as well.


 

Hi Skylar, sorry got on this late been out hiking the Bitterroots getting ready for snow.  Advice for skiing in the trees,slower powder skiing. I would say the most important thing to remember in the trees is to look at the gaps you will be going through do not look at the trees.  If you fixate on a particular tree where i.e., you are going to turn then you will very possibly hit or clip that tree, look in between at the snow/gap and slighly beyond not at the trees. Other things I may or may not do in the trees.  Adjust your speed to the trees you are skiing, the denser the trees the slower I ski and of course this also related to how steep it happens to be. Center or mass down the fall line, look ahead and ski the gaps.  Slow skiing in powder.  Jumps turns are usually ill advised, just bounce.  Adjust your bounce to your turns and the snows consistency and how steep it is. Get in some powder, run a straight line and bounce a little to get the FEEL for the snow, this will help you.  Pick the powder you are skiing, a little faster is good it will help you float better and it is easier to turn in powder with a little speed.  Speed (reasonable and under control) is your friend in powder.  Get in; bounce and feel the snow and this will help you in your confidence.  And before you know it---------

 

 

 

 

IMG_0721.JPG

 

You're in the trees enjoying the powder.  My ski bud Van at Lookout Pass, Montana Side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #105 of 113

ditto what most have said... However, no one is noting the Praxis Powder Boards or BPS. They come in 190+... I love em. I also have a pair of LibTech NAS Pow Skis. They are my go to if I am taking 1 ski to the hill. 191 and full of fun. 

 

Big Skis are so nice and easy to ski today. Man... I remember pow-dayz on the narrow 210s... no thanks ever again. ROCKER = WIN!

post #106 of 113

Hello,

 

You might try the Rossignol S7 Skis in a 188cm with a turn radius of 17.5. Surprisingly they do very well on hard pack as well. Very fun ski and since you are going to Whistler the snow there is much different than Tahoe. The snow up there is a little heavier and that ski will charge down the mountain and the ski has rocker in the tip and tail and camber under foot. Have a great ski season and good luck on the new ski gear purchase. Its always fun to go out buy new gear. Also while your in Whistler you can demo lots of skis to find the right fit for you. That's always a good way to go.

And as always

Happy Tracks!

post #107 of 113
Thread Starter 

I really wanted the s7's but they are completely sold out worldwide from what my local rossignol dealer told me :( and i will have to experiment with the bounce thank you for the help

post #108 of 113
http://www.backcountry.com/rossignol-2011-12-s7-ski-ros0697

79 in stock. I got my 10/11 S7 from them last year, I'm also in Canada and got them in 5 days. Defiantly Recommend backcountry.com
post #109 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylar Goodwin View Post

I really wanted the s7's but they are completely sold out worldwide from what my local rossignol dealer told me :( and i will have to experiment with the bounce thank you for the help

 

No they aren't, I just saw a pair the other day
 

http://store.christysports.com/catalog/ski_shop/ski/mens_powder_big_mountain_skis/rossignol_s7

 

 

post #110 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylar Goodwin View Post

I really wanted the s7's but they are completely sold out worldwide from what my local rossignol dealer told me :( and i will have to experiment with the bounce thank you for the help



YOUR dealer is sold out, but they're not sold out. 

 

post #111 of 113

The Elevation Ski Shop at Sun Peaks, where I work part time, has Rossi s7 in stock. I don't know lengths or price because I don't start at the store until store hours are increased in mid December but I could easily find out.

post #112 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post

Yeah, I'm 5'-10" and 140 lbs.  My 170cm K2 Apache Outlaws are 92mm wide at the waist and are great on hard pack, and I'm wondering if they're wide enough to really float on anything deep. I can probably get away with it since I'm pretty light.   But 85mm?  no no no no no....that would make a great carving ski, not deep snow.   

 

Of course, "deep snow" means different things to different people. 



It is certainly true that "deep snow" means something different to people. The choice of skiis you take is also dependend on where you wanna go and what your style is. If you like to do freestyle tricks in pow or do tree lines you need a different skii than if you love speed and go fast. For nearly every condition, you could have the perfect ski. But the question always is "Do I really need it?" If someone has atwo ski quiver, like something between 80 or 90 and if he really loves pow, something between 110 and 120 you will be certainly well eqipped. You can also take a 100 middle waist and use it for every condition, but one have to know that this ski won't be perfect neither in the deep stuff nor in the pow. As far as I knowI know they use skis from 105 to 120 in the freeride world tour. You'll see its your choice lads!

 

post #113 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by prenzn View Post



It is certainly true that "deep snow" means something different to people. The choice of skiis you take is also dependend on where you wanna go and what your style is. If you like to do freestyle tricks in pow or do tree lines you need a different skii than if you love speed and go fast. For nearly every condition, you could have the perfect ski. But the question always is "Do I really need it?" If someone has atwo ski quiver, like something between 80 or 90 and if he really loves pow, something between 110 and 120 you will be certainly well eqipped. You can also take a 100 middle waist and use it for every condition, but one have to know that this ski won't be perfect neither in the deep stuff nor in the pow. As far as I knowI know they use skis from 105 to 120 in the freeride world tour. You'll see its your choice lads!

 



By the way, I have the rossi Super S 7 in 195 cm and I'm getting along with it really good. I'm pretty 186 cm tall and have about 80 kg though.

 

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