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Too old? Hope not. Your advice, please [a Beginner Zone thread] - Page 2

post #31 of 48

My 2cents worth is to jump into the group lesson package.

If it is during the day you will get the benefit of small groups and usually a more mature crowd.

The social interaction is great and if it is a series of lessons with the same instructor they have the luxury of planning a progression based upon the group. Drills can be introduced, practiced and revisited as the group advances. 

Some of my best teaching groups were daytime season long groups. You have a lot of time to get to know each other and after thee class you have folks to ski with.

post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by slipshod View Post

BTW, I'm the OP in this thread. Just as an update, I've been out about a dozen times so far this season. It's been tons of fun and I'm making a bit of progress. Not much style, and I need to be reminded not to sit back or straighten up too much, but I'm able to control my speed and direction pretty well. Enough to enjoy all the greens and blues and survive the easier, wide-open blacks.



Who says you're the "OP"? (assuming that means "Old Person"?)  I'm older than you are, my DH is older that I am, and we ski five days a week!  And, just for the record, Marty Pavelich (NHL Hall of Famer, Red Wings) at 85, is still a Mountain Host at Big Sky and skis regularly in addition to the 27 day a season responsibilities of that job. Keep on keepin' on and more power to you though!

post #33 of 48

OP = Original poster.  That title in a thread can only belong to one person.  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skibearll View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by slipshod View Post

BTW, I'm the OP in this thread. Just as an update, I've been out about a dozen times so far this season. It's been tons of fun and I'm making a bit of progress. Not much style, and I need to be reminded not to sit back or straighten up too much, but I'm able to control my speed and direction pretty well. Enough to enjoy all the greens and blues and survive the easier, wide-open blacks.



Who says you're the "OP"? (assuming that means "Old Person"?)  I'm older than you are, my DH is older that I am, and we ski five days a week!  And, just for the record, Marty Pavelich (NHL Hall of Famer, Red Wings) at 85, is still a Mountain Host at Big Sky and skis regularly in addition to the 27 day a season responsibilities of that job. Keep on keepin' on and more power to you though!



 

post #34 of 48

Slipshod - Congratulations!  Sounds like things are going pretty well and best of all you're having a blast.

Dancing with the forces of nature is amazing, isn't it!  Celebrate every run!

post #35 of 48

 

Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

OP = Original poster.  That title in a thread can only belong to one person.  
 

 

 Hmmmm.

 

Ooops. biggrin.gif

 

Seems to me I knew that: or should have.  Sorry!

 

But my statement stands: Good for you, keep on!  You may be the "OP, original poster", but you're far from the oldest person out there!

post #36 of 48

Browsing around various ski forums on this balmy New England morning and I came across this inspiring thread late to the game.

 

I am the "OP" of the ski tips thread in this forum and you slipshod are exactly the very skier I had in mind for the free tips. 

 

Welcome to our beautiful sport and well done!!! 

post #37 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrstrat57 View Post

Browsing around various ski forums on this balmy New England morning and I came across this inspiring thread late to the game.

 

I am the "OP" of the ski tips thread in this forum and you slipshod are exactly the very skier I had in mind for the free tips. 

 

Welcome to our beautiful sport and well done!!! 


Thank you for starting that thread, my friend. I've read it from top to bottom, and even added my own humble contribution to the end. (I have no skiing expertise, but I know all about being a

confused beginner.)

And again, thanks everyone who has posted here for your encouragement.

 

post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by slipshod View Post


Thank you for starting that thread, my friend. I've read it from top to bottom, and even added my own humble contribution to the end. (I have no skiing expertise, but I know all about being a

confused beginner.)

And again, thanks everyone who has posted here for your encouragement.

 



 

 

You are most welcome. I have a very strong commitment to giving back to my sport as it has given me so many of my life's highlights. Thank you to Epicski for provided the venue for creating the thread. Epicski continues to be one of the greatest resources regarding alpine skiing on the internet. 

 

It means a lot to me that you used my beginner thread to help you on your quest!

 

That is a great contribution you made to the tips thread tonight. I believe I have 4 100 day seasons under my belt....2 while I was a very active ski instructor and 2 as a season pass holder at the local hill.

 

Once you have an idea of what you want to achieve and a plan on how to go about it nothing, absolutely nothing beats boots on the snow for as many days in a season as possible. I put in years of hard work (ok it wasn't really hard work, even drills are fun) and the reward is that even on a down ski year like the last two ( I am forced to focus on my day job more than I would like) I can still ski strong when the limited opportunity presents itself.

 

I have ski'd 2 days this year and the 3rd is coming up Thursday and I know I will ski better than ok......and it will be a bluebird day!

 

Enjoy Slipshod. Perhaps we can make a few turns on the same hill together some day!

 

 

post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrstrat57 View Post



 

 

You are most welcome. I have a very strong commitment to giving back to my sport as it has given me so many of my life's highlights. Thank you to Epicski for provided the venue for creating the thread. Epicski continues to be one of the greatest resources regarding alpine skiing on the internet. 

 

It means a lot to me that you used my beginner thread to help you on your quest!

 

That is a great contribution you made to the tips thread tonight. I believe I have 4 100 day seasons under my belt....2 while I was a very active ski instructor and 2 as a season pass holder at the local hill.

 

Once you have an idea of what you want to achieve and a plan on how to go about it nothing, absolutely nothing beats boots on the snow for as many days in a season as possible. I put in years of hard work (ok it wasn't really hard work, even drills are fun) and the reward is that even on a down ski year like the last two ( I am forced to focus on my day job more than I would like) I can still ski strong when the limited opportunity presents itself.

 

I have ski'd 2 days this year and the 3rd is coming up Thursday and I know I will ski better than ok......and it will be a bluebird day!

 

Enjoy Slipshod. Perhaps we can make a few turns on the same hill together some day!

 

 

Oh wait a minute - how on earth do you get 100 day seasons when you're from RI and you have a day job?  I want to know  your secret!
 

 

post #40 of 48

Ha ha, didn't have a day job....laid off. I was teaching skiing full time....ski'd 105 days for a couple of years for the bubble($0) ...I was substitute teaching too, if I didn't get called in I had the Subaru loaded and went to Mt. Snow, was back before anyone knew I had gone....they just handed me my comp ticket at the desk and I was off to the North Face for run after run after run....as long as I showed up at the occasional ss lineup it was all good.

 

.....prior to that had a season pass and ski'd every day either before or after work....I had boots on the snow throughout the entire 90's at least 50 days a year.....

 

I hope to get back to skiing every day again soon!  

 

I have said many times on epic including in the recent do you want to be an instructor thread....I highly recommend any dedicated intermediate skier take the ITC at their local hill and discover if teaching skiing is right for them....at the very least you will get exceptional instruction for a compressed period of time....best thing I ever did!

post #41 of 48

Slipshod wrote about a skier he met on the chair: "He said he couldn't ski in extreme cold because his steel hip joints act up! As it is, he wears gym shorts with pockets under his ski pants and keeps heat packs in those inner pockets to warm his hips. He got right off the lift and went straight down the black run under the chairs." Now THAT is determination!

 

Great thread! Sounds to me like several have found some inspiration to start skiing. Careful, now, it's addictive. <g>

 

FWIW: as I've aged, technique has replaced muscle and energy. A dedicated L3 instructor (actually the instructor for all the ski school instructors) has over two years brought me to a place I never dreamed of in my 50s and 60s. My two cents, Slipshod, is that finding an L3 who sees YOUR skiing specifically (i.e., the converse of "one size fits all"), remembers what he or she has observed, and tailors progressive instruction to you, will take you to new heights!

post #42 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OlderThanDirt View Post

Slipshod wrote about a skier he met on the chair: "He said he couldn't ski in extreme cold because his steel hip joints act up! As it is, he wears gym shorts with pockets under his ski pants and keeps heat packs in those inner pockets to warm his hips. He got right off the lift and went straight down the black run under the chairs." Now THAT is determination!

 

Great thread! Sounds to me like several have found some inspiration to start skiing. Careful, now, it's addictive. <g>

 

FWIW: as I've aged, technique has replaced muscle and energy. A dedicated L3 instructor (actually the instructor for all the ski school instructors) has over two years brought me to a place I never dreamed of in my 50s and 60s. My two cents, Slipshod, is that finding an L3 who sees YOUR skiing specifically (i.e., the converse of "one size fits all"), remembers what he or she has observed, and tailors progressive instruction to you, will take you to new heights!

I'd like to find an instructor like that. My last lesson wasn't entirely satisfactory and my progress has been a little slower than I'd like. Gonna take a day off skiing today and go skating instead.
 

 

post #43 of 48
If you're buying privates, ask for a Level III. In group lessons, look for the gold pin.
post #44 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slipshod View Post

I'd like to find an instructor like that. My last lesson wasn't entirely satisfactory and my progress has been a little slower than I'd like. Gonna take a day off skiing today and go skating instead.
 

 

Replying to my own post (I guess I can do that), I grew up skating and I would love to feel as natural on skis as I do on skates. I kind of envy the little kids I see at the hill. They all look so confident and fearless, and they seem to learn so fast.

Kneale, thanks for the tip on instructors. I'll inquire about an L3 mentor at the hill, although I think my disappointing lesson was maybe more an issue of personalities or teaching style than qualifications. I'm not a great communicator and, unfortunately, neither was the instructor..
 

 

post #45 of 48

Slipshod, ice skating and roller blading are among the better cross-training activities for skiing! 

 

Kneale Brownson is an excellent instructional resource, as his many posts across many threads confirm. I always enjoy what he has to say. Perhaps he might comment on importance of the art and challenges of teaching skiing. My understanding is that the PSIA has increased the importance of the teaching component of the L3 exam.

 

Over the last ten years I've had four L3 instructors over many private lessons. All were good instructors who taught me useful motions. Statistically, most L3 instructors will be within one deviation of the mean when it comes to teaching skills, eh? So I learned from all. But the latest instructor has the ability to nail just what the next step in progression is for me, specifically. The last lesson, for example, totally focused on dorsiflexion at initiation. The experience was "shazam," affecting my turn shape, balance, and -- wonderfully -- ability to hug the zipper line.

 

How did my instructor know that this simple motion was the next step for me? I'm clueless. No doubt, all L3's know the importance of this basic biomechanical motion. But I believe that like comedy, timing in instructing students is one key to the art. The time, then, was right.

 

 

post #46 of 48
Thread Starter 

This novice skier stuff sure has its ups and downs. Wednesday, our little hill was uncrowded and beautfully groomed. Never stood in a line all day, skied every run on the hill, and never once resorted to a wedge. It was my best day yet, and I felt like a real skier.

Then came yesterday. Eight inches of fresh, heavy snow made my son, an advanced snowboarder, ecstatic, but it made me miserable. One ski or the other kept bogging down, the green runs were unusably slow, and I spent the whole afternoon fighting to stay up on the steeper slopes. I finally took a minor but very unpleasant tumble. I'm wondering how in heck anyone can ski in heavy, cut-up slop like that.

post #47 of 48
Thread Starter 

Well, that's it for this year. Went slush skiing on Saturday as our local hill closed out the season, spent a summery Sunday riding my bike in shorts, sandals and T-shirt, and ventured over to Quebec yesterday to get in one last day on the slopes. It was hot -- a small crowd in shorts and tank tops -- and the snow was sparse and sloppy.

My first-ever season started late and ended early because of the weather. But I had tons of fun, got my money's worth, and I'll be buying a pass again next year. I didn't improve as much as I had hoped -- I'm still very weak when the conditions are tough, like yesterday -- but with any luck the season will be longer and snowier next year.

I'd just like to say thanks for the advice and encouragement of you folks on epicski, which has become a favorite site for me.

post #48 of 48
Thread Starter 

This thread drew some great and helpful replies when it was new, and I'm advised that an update might be in order. So here goes. I'm the OP. I'm now 66. After three seasons, I still ski, still love it, and I'm eagerly anticipating my fourth. I've moved to a very ski-friendly location, right across the road from one hill and an easy half-hour drive from another. I guess I'm an intermediate skier now, but I still feel like a beginner and get a lot out of this forum. One of the best tips: Get a copy of Soft Skiing by Lito Tejada-Flores, an instruction book designed to keep older skiers healthy, happy and on the slopes.

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