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Anybody heard of "Bomber Skis" ??

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I don't rightly know how I stumbled upon this a minute ago, but I'm on a website now looking at Bomber Skis....A new ski company based out of Vermont building race skis.  Says they are built in Italy by someone with 35 years experience.  My guess would be the Vist/Blossom/Hart factory again.

 

http://bomberski.com/index.html

 

Anybody care to confirm or deny these allegations?

 

Exotic Skis doesn't even have them listed yet.

post #2 of 18

Heard of them.  Local ski shop got a visit from them (or something like that).  I stopped paying attention when I saw the price tag.  $1500 for a ski - no binding.  You can buy them from ebay for $1100ish (buy it now price).

 

I guess their business model it to charge more than all the "proven on the WC" manufactures do.  This way everyone will know their product is better rolleyes.gif.

 

There's a big difference between 35 years experience and 35 years of success.

 

I still don't get the "handmade is better" bit. 

 

post #3 of 18

How is Bomber the snowboard binding company allowing that? www.bomberonline.com has been around for a long time. I hope Fin gets some lawyers on their butts. I know he doesn't make skis, but still. It's Bomber and it is snowsports related.

post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 

If it's expensive it MUST be better though right?

post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

If it's expensive it MUST be better though right?



beercheer.gif

 

I work in manufacturing putting sensitive mw electronics in jet fighters.  It is an insanely rough environment (vibration, heat etc).  Given a preference, I'll go in the jet fighter built with automation.  People can hand build amazing things and there are things we can't get our machines to do and have to rely on "handmade" to do those things.  But I can get consistency from a machine that a human will never deliver.  Especially when you are building things under a microscope that can't be seen with the naked eye.

 

Skis aren't built under a microscope but the same principle applies.  If there are inconsistencies in machine built products, buy better machines or keep them within stricter tolerances.  The latter is probably why so many people complain about a manufacturing tune.  The first 500 were probably perfect and then the machines started drifting (just guessing).

 

post #6 of 18

 

As far as the skis go, they are supposedly made by tech, who used to make Rossi's race skis.. Hand built.

Torsionally ultra stiff, they hold great on ice/boiler plate, but not very forgiving, if any at all....... I've being told that info from a guy who skied on them..

 

The skis are made somewhere in Europe, between Swiss/Italy.....

Skis come without a plate and any plate  bindings combo, could be installed......

 

You can find them @ artechski.com

 

P.S. there was another short thread here about these skis, there wasn't much more info though.

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post


Skis aren't built under a microscope but the same principle applies.  If there are inconsistencies in machine built products, buy better machines or keep them within stricter tolerances.  The latter is probably why so many people complain about a manufacturing tune.  The first 500 were probably perfect and then the machines started drifting (just guessing).

 


 

So long as your starting ingredients are uniform enough to do this there is no problem.     I can see where wood cores frex would NOT be more consistent with automation: the hand building goes into both selecting the proper starting material and in adapting the design to the material available.

 

The other issue is volume.     If you're only going to make one or two of any given flex, for example, hand building becomes a time-to-tool-up bargain and a speed of adaptation (let's just shave down a bit here) bargain.     Especially if starting from imperfectly quantizable ingredients, like full grain wood (as opposed to plywood frex).

 

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by andy4g63 View Post

 

As far as the skis go, they are supposedly made by tech, who used to make Rossi's race skis.. Hand built.

Torsionally ultra stiff, they hold great on ice/boiler plate, but not very forgiving, if any at all....... I've being told that info from a guy who skied on them..

 

The skis are made somewhere in Europe, between Swiss/Italy.....

Skis come without a plate and any plate  bindings combo, could be installed......

 

You can find them @ artechski.com

 

P.S. there was another short thread here about these skis, there wasn't much more info though.



Which sounds similar to COHEN skis.  That had a thread that turned into a Mel Brooks routine.  I believe the COHEN's were supposed to be torsionally stiff and soft in length.

 

cantunamunch,

 

agreed.

 

 

post #9 of 18

I have spoken several times at length with the person responsible for bringing the  Bomber race ski into the U.S.  They are indeed built by the same person producing the Cohen skis, but to different specs with different materials, I am told.  The builder is reportedly an ex Rossignol raceroom guru with tons of experience and a good reputation.  The skis had originally been manufactured using time rented at the Blossom facility in Italy, taking advantage of the excellent equipment, materials and craftsmen at Blossom, but the builder has apparently created a brand-new production facility in Switzerland or Italy due to demand for the product and will be dedicated to producing the skis exclusively at his new factory.

 

I have personally skied the Cohen SL and GS skis this past July at Les Deux Alpes in France and ExoticsSkis.com is already hooked up and ready to do a formal set of tests on both the Bomber and Cohen skis early this season in Vermont.  I can say the Cohen SL and GS are the real-deal race skis, but not difficult to ski.  Stay tuned for more info!  We're psyched to get on both series of skis and let people know how they handle in a variety of conditions.

 

We will have a listing for them as soon as we have more info about them solidified!

post #10 of 18

One of the reasons that Bomber was brought over to the U.S. was the idea of supplying more quality European race ski's.

 

The ski's are manufactured in Europe, not sure of the manufacturer. 

 

Seems that world cup ski's can be in short demand (European manufacturers sell local first) for the race group in the U.S. I met the reps at Mt. Hood summer before last (2010) and this was one of the reasons they said: they only had race ski's at that time. Obviously the market hasn't exploded for them, but time will tell.   

 

 

post #11 of 18
Was skiing in Stowe last spring with a client (who was skiing on the Bomber GS ski) and we bumped into the founder of Bomber Ski. After a couple of runs we went in for coffee. During coffee there was a lot of dicussion about the skis, which I really was not listening to as everyone says thier skis are great. The founder said he had some skis across the street and asked if I would like to try them, which I did. This guy put me on a 162 slalom ski. Now, the group that I was skiing with likes to make HIGH speed GS turns so I had fears about being put on a slalom sk..... Have to say the ski was amazing! Very stable at high speeds but will turn on a dime when you even think about it. When we got to the top after the first run I ran into a friend that is an amazing skier and has the same boot length. I changed skis with him and after one run he purchased four pairs of skis from the founder. Since then I recieved a pair of slalom skis and the Bomber all mountain ski, Stealth, which I also love. I have let several people in Stowe try my skis and have not found one person that does not rave about the ski. The skis are expensive! I compare it to owning an exotic car, if you have the money and want a high performance piece of equipment, buy it.
post #12 of 18

I have a hard time believing this.  I see the Bomber ski all over NY as a novelty item...something you give out to rich clients at Christmastime.  I wrote before that my demo snapped in too after a bumps run.  Not good.

post #13 of 18
Surprised to hear that you snapped the ski in two as it is not a foam core ski. Have to say though that given the right conditions any ski can be broken. The client that had the pair was on a GS ski. He is 220 lbs and participated in the masters race circut. He is a powerful skier, not gentle on his skis, and has had no problems. This is a performance ski and as such is typically provided with a race tune. The average skier getting on this ski would not find it very forgiving as it would NOT like to skid but would want to carve turns. If your are going to want to skid your turns you are going to have to bevel the ski to what works for you. If you are looking for a ski that is very stable at higher speeds then this is the ski for you as the tip does not flutter all over the place. I have not skied their bump ski (did not know it was even available last year) so can't comment.
post #14 of 18
bomber skis rock!
Visited the new pop up mercer st location in Soho this weekend and saw the whole line. Tortional rigidity , solid wood and metal core and noe twin tips-got myself a pair,team there was really knowledgeable about racing technology. I got the stealth bomber and because I was from Park City they gave me a ripper discount!?!? Def a company to watch.
post #15 of 18

I purchased a pair at a charity auction, to support the event I did not know anything about them but they have turned out to a fantastic ski. I am an expert female skier who skis in the east as well as in the west.I got the Bomber all mountain ski and they are amazing! These skis are, versatile, easy to turn, and hold on the ice. They are pricey  but in my opinion they are totally worth it. I ski at Killington and have three pairs of skis in my locker, I reach for these most frequently.It is my understanding they are made in the Hart Factory in Italy.

post #16 of 18

My son and I tested the B-1 165 SL. He is a 200 lb ex racer trying to get back in form after having his leg bolted back together after injury. We were skiing on some narrow late spring frozen crud on narrow trails and icy open slopes. The skis are reminiscent of the Rossignol early attempts at shape. It was the Rossi "R" ski. They were short, wide, and shaped before the technology had matured. They did not have much impact on racing. These things work very well. They are light, stiff, and torsionally rigid. They snap into and out of turns very quickly. We had our gps running and found that it maxed out around 45 mph. At that point they got a bit squirrely. They can be twisted and jammed into edge sets but really are much happier in full edge lock carves. I was on some 188 volkl gs skis and he stayed right with it.

 

I would recommend it for fit U18 racers but I suspect they might break if used outside prepared courses. The forebody is extremely thin. I suspect this is part of what makes it enter into short radius sl turns so well. The company will build you custom layups if you want a stronger ski. My son recently delaminated a Tiger SL. I suspect he is way too aggressive for off the rack (race stock or not) skis.

 

So far these look good. I will be up in the Sud Tirol region in Kastelruth in the fall and may try to visit the plant.

 

Catskill Eddie 

post #17 of 18

Yup ... got a pair.

 

The B-1 Bomber ski is not made in Vermont. It is a name made up by an importer. Like several other skis it is made in a small European factory. You can custom design any aspect of the ski including the graphics. So they made up the name.

 

I work with Carpani in Vidicciatico, Italy. Fillipo the owner and chief engineer of the company, will do anything you want ... for a price. His "stock" skis are FIS complaint, primarily race stock skis. Once you start working with him, he can hand lay up anything you want. For example: you can start with his F5 GS ski and "beef it up with additional fiberglass. I believe he was Tomba's top tech guy. Tomba was a beast. He weighed around100 kg and had thighs like a gorilla. He would delaminate any normal ski. This summer I looked at some of his "concept skis" he is working on. One model uses a honeycomb core. The completed ski weighed one quarter of a normal recreational ski. He pictures it as an extremely light mountaineering ski.On the other hand, some women need a softer flex they can bend. In that case the glass is thinner.

 

For most advanced skiers his stock skis are outstanding. You can not buy anything like it "off the rack". But understand this: they are not your normal week-end skier type of ski. Don't expect to simply swish your way down the piste while waving to your friends on the deck. These skis, like a finely tuned sports car, require the utmost attention. My son and I can ski down anything with the B-1s but put on the average duffer's feet they fall on their ass. Your weight transfers, edging, pressure, and rotational forces must be spot on. Sure you could buy a pair of these and detune them, but why waste your money. Go to your nearest shop and buy one of the major manufacturer's standard skis.

 

But if you want the most out of your skis and you are willing to devote the time and effort to be in shape and ski precisely, you will be amazed what these kind of skis can do. Check around but I like Carpani http://www.carpanisci.com/models/race/line-fis/

 

Catskill

post #18 of 18

Yes, I own the Woodie Bomber All Mountain Ski. In short, they are phenomenal.

 

Last year, I had a GS pro-am I was participating in (I'm the am in the pro-am).  I did my handicapping races on Thursday with my Kastle MX78s. And, since Bomber was a sponsor to the race, I tried a demo of them Thursday afternoon.

 

Candidly, I wasn't expecting to have a ski choice controversy the night before the races started because I love my Kastle's. But, there I was, psychologically torn between which ski to race with.

 

The Bomber felt faster and more stable than my Kastle's. So I made the decision to run with the Bombers and I wasn't disappointed.

 

In fact, there were quite a few folks who switched to the Bomber's based on their feel. I was using the All Mountain ski and some others were using the racing skis. The professional racers mentioned how much they loved the Bomber ski but said that it would be too unforgiving for amateurs.

 

By far, my favorite pair of skis I own.

 

Shawn

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