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Defining moments in your skiing. - Page 2

post #31 of 54

1965 a junior high schooler who thought he could ski.  I had been to race camp, and could do a really lame royal christie and everything.  We had been living a couple of years in Madison, WI and had been ripping all of those 300' killer lines.  That February we moved to Anchorage, AK.

 

The first run at Alyeska there was about 2' of fresh snow, and nothing was groomed; it got my full and undivided attention.  I was absolutely flailing, doing the one turn and burn; it was like linked craters.  Can still remember thinking, 'I'm going to have to work on this'.  That one run was the beginning of a wonderfully misspent youth.

 

 And yes, I am still working on it.

post #32 of 54

Two things for me, bump skiing and powder skiing. My bump skiing suddenly happened, the first time in Park City, Utah. I'd spent the previous 3 months in New Zealand training, and passing my ski instructors qualification. A group of us worked in PC, and I'd never skied bumps so well. It truly felt effortless. I wasn't even thinking about the bumps. I could do it all, turn anywhere i liked, hell I didn't even mind jumping the odd bump that happened upon me. It wasn't a hard slam, slam slam knee killer skiing, but actual skiing, smooth, but aggressive through the bump.s

Oh, and the first time I suddenly 'got' powder, and you get your first face shots.

post #33 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post

 

"An obstacle that you had to overcome" hits home with me.  Defining moments used to be all about overcoming obstacles for me....turning negative energy into positive forward motion in skiing, and in some aspects, life as well. (this is probably gonna be long...but screw it, I'm sitting in a hotel room late at night in a foreign city and can't sleep...what else am I gonna do).

 

<snip>lots of great stuff</snip>

 

If any of you have taken the time to read this entire thing, which I guess has now morphed into more of a blog post, I hope you notice one theme in all of this.  That I was never competing with or comparing myself to anyone else during any of these moments.  It was all an internal struggle and a competition within myself.  So that whole 1% thing?  The only 1% that mattered to me was the 1% of myself that said, "wait, yeah I think I can ski that", when the other 99% of me  was screaming out, "hell no, don't go down there that shit is nuts".  Because that's when then the competition begins within oneself to convert that negative energy into positive...and then you go, and then you learn, and then you overcome.

 

 

 

 

 



Thank you for taking the time to write all of that.

I did read the whole thing and it was a great read. 

 

The end paragraph about how you're mostly concerned with conquering(my word not yours) the 1% of you that you struggle with really hits home with me.  

My own head games are my biggest stumbling block, and very little has to do with what other people are doing, or if other people are watching.  

 

Another thing that hits home is how "turning negative energy into positive forward motion in skiing, and in life as well".

 

I'm finding that, the more I set my spirit free, the more my skiing opens up.  

 

Let me share one(just one) defining moment in my skiing.......

The first ESA I attended was a defining moment in my skiing and in my life.  I had lived in Northern Michigan, within 25 miles of where I was born for 40 years.   ESA Stowe was the first time I'd traveled alone and was doing something with people who didn't know any of my friends or family.  I was just me, and it was interesting to experience this kind of camp without any of my usual outside influences!

 

 I had learned to ski when I was just out of high school, by my boyfriend and his friend.  They taught me how to snow plow on the bunny hill, left me there to practice, then came back long enough to tell me it was time for the "bigger hill".

Their only instruction on the bigger hill(which is only a blue cruiser) was "its just like two tracking.  You turn to slow, don't slow to turn.  And, keep up, we're not waiting at the lift"

That is how I skied for 22 years eek.gif

When I attended ESA Jeb Boyd was my coach and the first thing he told me was "Girl we're going to slow you down and teach you to ski" 

I often tell people that I started using skis when I was 18, but didn't learn to ski until I was 40.............. and I'm still learning. biggrin.gif

 

 

 

^^^^ This was a defining moment in my skiing and my life!

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by Trekchick - 10/24/11 at 7:58am
post #34 of 54

boys....nonono2.gif .    they should call that the "older brother (or ex-boyfriend) coaching method".  I hope you made him pay later.  wink.gifbiggrin.gif

 

 

post #35 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

boys....nonono2.gif .    they should call that the "older brother (or ex-boyfriend) coaching method".  I hope you made him pay later.  wink.gifbiggrin.gif

 

 



roflmao.gif

 

Its funny you should say that.  Just a few years ago, the friend of the boyfriend was on a ski trip with me a few years ago and said, "Its kinda cool that the student has surpassed the teacher"

I'm still not sure why I ever went skiing again after that first night, other than I didn't want to be "the girl who couldn't do it"

 

I'd also like to thank my niece and nephew for asking me to chaperone their school ski trips.  It was them and their enthusiasm that got me really excited about skiing and have influenced what I do today!

Kids are amazing!

 

post #36 of 54

Another defining moment in my skiing came to mind (it involved little skiing, but a lot of watching)...

 

So I'm 12 years old, out to Jackson Hole with my friend and his family.  After a couple days hitting most places on the mountain, we decide to ski up to the top of Corbet's to see what all the buzz was about and experience one of the most famous ski runs in the world.  We had no intention of skiing it that day (it hadn't snowed in a while), but we get up there and feel the verve... there were about 20 people just chillin up there on a sunny day, and there's this dude with a long beard, long hair, a pair of sunglasses, and a biker-cap/bandanna, probably mid-fifties.  He is on the skier's right boulder that kind of sticks out into the couloir, and his skis are facing toward us.  We were standing back probably 50 feet, so we see him jump in, and then he disappears.  WOW.  So we ski up the edge and check it out.  I discovered there was a chute entrance to the left (which at that time required mandatory air), and then the huck entrance off the boulder.  Pretty cool.

 

So, a couple days later in a massive blizzard I am determined I will go ski it.  I am even so confident I will do it I have my friends mom come out with a camera to photograph my skiing Corbet's (my friend wasn't skiing that day).  Anyway, I get up there, analyze the situation... the wind is howling, you can only see 30 feet in front of you, and there is not another person in sight besides the two of us.  I go over to the chute entrance and find I just can't handle that.  Then I go over to the boulder and spend about 5 minutes thinking about it.  Then I side-slip down to the bottom and look at the landing.  I wait there for about 10 minutes.  Then, my friend's mom says she's too cold and leaves.  I spend a good deal more time by myself looking down into the powder in the couloir wondering if I can safely pull this off (I had hucked a large 15 foot boulder earlier in the vacation and was surprised how "impactuous" the landing was, even in deep fresh snow).  I decided I couldn't do it.  Damn!  I could ski the rest of the mountain, but not that famous couloir.

 

I returned to Jackson once more, but when most of the mountain (and Corbet's) was closed, so I didn't get another shot.  I have a framed picture of Corbet's in my room to inspire me to rise to new challenges.

post #37 of 54

In the thread, have you ever been gripped, well I have, I relate a similar experience up on main when conditions sucked. I did have a lunatic moment after staring and waiting a long time in horrible doubt, and suffered mightily for it. sounds like at your age, with another 40 years to do what the bearded dude did, you made the exact right call. good for you.icon14.gif

post #38 of 54

defining moment related to skiing for me?  My now wife and I were dating and winter started to roll around for the first time since we met.  She says,

"Do you ski?"

Well, yes darling I do... but I have to be honest with you about skiing.  I have a bunch of buddies who's girlfriends "ski."  They spend all day not doing anything fun, have to leave the guys, and we don't see them until the end of the day, and they had no fun at all when we ask them later on.  I refuse to sit around on bunny slopes trying to teach someone to ski, and I would hate to have that friction.

"Well good, because I don't teach people either.  I grew up going to Vail ski school, my parents have a house in Vail, and I can ski anything you can."

So, when are we getting married?

*end moment*

 

I hadn't skied really in 4 years since I was in Tucson for school, so this was a great way for me to get back into it, too.  She didn't even mention that her family had saved all their vintage one piece ski suits!

 

post #39 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by guroo270 View Post

defining moment related to skiing for me?  My now wife and I were dating and winter started to roll around for the first time since we met.  She says,

"Do you ski?"

Well, yes darling I do... but I have to be honest with you about skiing.  I have a bunch of buddies who's girlfriends "ski."  They spend all day not doing anything fun, have to leave the guys, and we don't see them until the end of the day, and they had no fun at all when we ask them later on.  I refuse to sit around on bunny slopes trying to teach someone to ski, and I would hate to have that friction.

"Well good, because I don't teach people either.  I grew up going to Vail ski school, my parents have a house in Vail, and I can ski anything you can."

So, when are we getting married?

*end moment*

 

I hadn't skied really in 4 years since I was in Tucson for school, so this was a great way for me to get back into it, too.  She didn't even mention that her family had saved all their vintage one piece ski suits!

 



How Hot is that!?  icon14.gif

post #40 of 54

It's the hottest thing ever.  beercheer.gif

post #41 of 54

I hate to have my "defining moment" be defined by gear, but I think it is. As I progressed in my skiing through the '90s as a teen, I always hated powder. Granted, I was still young, not all that strong, and my technique was improving by the day. But powder just always seemed like more of a hassle than fun. Most of that time was spent on pretty skinny skis - like maybe in the low-mid-60mm waist range.

 

So one day I was at Breckenridge, and about 5 or 6 inches of fresh was on the ground. I was getting tugged all over the place, couldn't turn well in the chop, tiring myself out, the usual. At the time, I knew fatter skis were supposed to help with this, but fat skis were still in their "could be a passing fad" stage, and I'd never given them much thought. So, I got fed up that day and finally demoed some "fat" skis that had 75-80mm waists (hah!). 

 

Breakthrough. I was charging though crud, looking for tree drifts to plow though, making big, fast, aggressive turns. Not worrying about the snow. Not getting pulled around and falling. That was probably the best ski day of my life up to that point, just because I didn't know what I was missing before, and I was having so much fun in powder for the first time. I finally understood why everyone loves the fluff. I realized that the fat skis were not going to be a passing fad. 

 

I know, I know, I good skier can ski powder on skinny skis. But a developing skier can ski powder at a higher level, sooner, on fatter skis. I think that day was also important in that it helped me understand that gear really does make a big difference, along with skill level (I had always been more of the "figure it out yourself, it ain't the gear" type). 

post #42 of 54

Too many to count from last year, the first was just a confidence builder that "yeah, I actually can huck this without blowing a knee up." Second was learning to get out of the trough with a buddy in winter park, soo much smoother. Third was learning to flex the ski in powder instead of bouncing up and down, allowed me to easily ski anything on my mountain. The most defining of last year was probably my first 360, on the last day of the season, really just rounded the year out nicely.

post #43 of 54

TYRONE, 

   Awesome man, do you ever go over to Mammoth?????    If so we have to hook up, I'm a little older and wiser now but I still like the big airs (not 100 footers though, say 30 is enough for me these days), providing the landing are nice and steep (knees too).  Great pics !.   

post #44 of 54

This is an easy one; moving to Tahoe in 1995. I thought I was pretty decent skier, until I watched the guys at Squaw and Alpine ski. Boy, did I have a lot to learn.

 

 

 

 

post #45 of 54

ahhhhh, yes. I forgot, in my rapture for my son's progress and pivotal moments, that part about myself. Moving to Tahoe in 2003, after skiing here as a weekend warrior for 40 years, and buying my first pass. My skiing began to seriously progress for the first time in a very long time. This is the dream of my life now come true (a dream of skiing can not be put off indefinitely, it has a biological clock), and if realizing your dream isn't a defining moment, nothing isyahoo.gif.

post #46 of 54

First defining moment.. First day of lift served skiing after 2 years of back yard/back country farm hill hiking on garage sale gear.

 

Second defining moment..  First USSA competition.  I had joined the team to get better and ski with friends every night, but I had no idea how much fun the meets actually were.

 

Third defining moment.. Landing a job teaching at the local ski dump last year of high school.  Weekly instructor clinics really improved my overall skill set way beyond what I though possible. 

 

Fourth defining moment, first trip to the Rockies and first HUGE powder day.  Several more breathtaking location trips to follow, but still love to ski any place with snow.

 

 

I would have to say that the most recent and glaring defining moment in my skiing recently is the glaring realization that I am now too fragile to take really big risks to the degree that I did all through the past 30+ years.  One minor compression from landing a jump a little past the table top LZ eek.gifpopped a rib two seasons ago.  Didn't even fall, skied the rest of the day, but couldn't sleep on one side of my body for 6 weeks.  First  day of the next season (that's right, eight months of healing later) I had a minor collision that put me down kinda hard and I injured that same rib area again.hopmad.gif  Skied the rest of the day but couldn't sleep on that side for 6 weeks.  My skiing has reached it's zenith.  I will still ski all open terrain and conditions, but my air will be a bit smaller, my lines will be a bit more conservative, and my speeds will be a bit slower.  15 years ago either of those events would not have resulted in any noticeable injury. 

 

The price for failure (or even just showing up) is much higher these days, but I will continue to do this as much as possible..

post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Moving to Tahoe in 2003, after skiing here as a weekend warrior for 40 years, and buying my first pass. My skiing began to seriously progress for the first time in a very long time. This is the dream of my life now come true (a dream of skiing can not be put off indefinitely, it has a biological clock), and if realizing your dream isn't a defining moment, nothing isyahoo.gif.


When people ask me how they can ski better my answer is pretty much always the same, move to a ski town! Now, I'm not saying you can't get better just going on the weekends or vacations. However I'm talking about taking your skiing to much higher levels.  You can lay money on the fact that the guy you see skiing a line effortlessly at warp 9 more then likely lives there or did live in a ski town at some point. 

 

post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ske-Bum View Post


When people ask me how they can ski better my answer is pretty much always the same, move to a ski town! Now, I'm not saying you can't get better just going on the weekends or vacations. However I'm talking about taking your skiing to much higher levels.  You can lay money on the fact that the guy you see skiing a line effortlessly at warp 9 more then likely lives there or did live in a ski town at some point. 

 


Thats for sure, my skiing hasn't gotten any better since I moved away from Colorado, seems like I spend every ski trip just trying to get almost back to where I was.... 

 

post #49 of 54

I have two.

 

The first was a private lesson from a Welsh ski instructor in Niseko, Japan (and me an Australian ... globalisation in action).  I'd had a couple of private lessons before that, but something from this guy just clicked with me.  At the end of the lesson I was playing with the hill for the first time, rather than struggling against it.  That was in 2006 - maybe my eighth day on skis.

 

The second was the first time I came over a little ridge, hit a bump, got myself all out of shape, stuck a ski down onto the (hardpack) snow and carved that one leg back underneath me to recover the situation.  I'd seen that sort of thing done in movies, and I reckon about then I decided I was worthy of "Yeah, I can ski".

post #50 of 54
Thread Starter 

Here is another from me the OP. 

 

Back in 2001 at the begining of my divorce proceedings, I finally got to ski Europe.  The trip was planned before the split and fortunately the ex wasn't on the trip.  Anyway I went with my Uncle who introduced skiing to me and his son whom I skied with quite a bit while learning to ski as a teen and later in life when ever we could.  Anyway we went to St. Anton because my uncle had always wanted to ski the Austrian Alps the birthplace of skiing.  Of course I was in for this adventure.

 

Though I only spent one day skiing with my uncle on blue runs, I spent the other four days skiing with my cousin in an advanced clinic for off piste skiing.  We skied off the back of different lifts, skiing the off piste routes from town to town having lunch in little bistros and Huttes even using taxis at times to get us to the next town and another lift up the mountain.  I called it taxi cab skiing.  I met and skied with folks from all over the world.  It is to date my absolute favorite ski trip.

 

It was exactly what I needed at that time in my life.  My ex-wife never understood my passion for skiing though she was a decent skier herself.  I find it ironic as my current wife does understand and she doesn't ski.

 

Rick G

post #51 of 54

From the kids angle, my defining moment is when all 4 of them decided (not simultaneously) to give up snowboarding to come back to skiing.

 

For me, it was 2 minor evetns compared to Tyrone but they involved overcoming fear.

 

April, 1978.  Graduation present from HS was a trip to Alta. Didn't have to bend my Dad's arm to take me on that one.  A week alone with my Dad (I have 2 brothers and a sister), and watching it snow all day, every day for 4 straight days.  Couldn't see much so we took it easy.  On day 5 (a Thursday), the clouds cleared and we had waist deep pow to ourselves - youdon't see that any more.  We ventured into the steeps (Lone Pine?) and I realized that my perception of steep (Stowe's Starr trail) wasn't even close to what our western brethren were skiing.  I took a deep breath and traversed....my Dad yelled "just do the first turn!"  It was face shots and laps for the rest of the day after the first one.

 

I lived in Germany from January 1988 to November 1992.  I hadn't skied much since college (8 years) and had lost most of my nerve.  One day in early 1989, we had a huge lunch and many beers on the deck at Hintertux and I just ripped after that - the beers hid my inhibitions and my instincts and.  Attacked rollovers without being able to see the landings, straightlined bumps, stuck a couple of 10 footers...tame stuff compared to TS, but for me it put me back in the saddle.

 

I'm over 50 now and have gotten pretty tentative again.  I'm in the best shape I've been in over a decade and I plan to ski with younger, better, more aggresive skiers at Magic to get me back on track.

post #52 of 54

Defining moment!   Im going to be boring,   because its just that first time I skied down a slope at the age of about 24 or so.  Over 23 years ago now.

 

At this stage of my life Im never going to hit the level of sking some of you guys have written about,  but still with every trip I feel progress and something that once looked unattainable all of sudden becomes something I do without much thought,  ie taking a jump cant boost about here though as theres certainly no double diggets in measuring  the drop off! 

  After each trip is desire to get back and how can we get there quicker.  

We skied overseas in Japan for the first forray out of Australia in Feb 2011 in what was organised as a once in a lifetime trip,  yet all of sudden we have a trip booked to Utah Feb 2012  and plans already underway for Japan 2013.  Where does it end!  hopefully it doesnt at 47 I find myself trekking back to the gym after many years of apathy because I realise to ski better and longer into my years left on the palnet I need to be fitter and stronger.

 

Defining moments in skiing for me just dont stop-  cant get enough skiing is my problem!

 

cheers

 

Richo 

post #53 of 54

i started skiing in 1996 as a 6th grader on a school, but i had a gap of 9 years due to my parent's finances. i didn't get to develop what i started when i was young, but i loved that day in 1996. i promised myself i would get back into when i was older. low and behold, i found myself at blue mountain, ontario in 2005 of a trip with friends. i was a jittery, pizza carving wuss on rentals that first day back. but i kept at it, after 2 more trips with friends, i finally got my own set of skis (atomic izor 3:1) with bindings et al for a good price. So at that point, I was a jittery, pizza carving wuss with my own gear :D lol. i was afraid to even go to the top of blue mountain. I was skiing with friends of similar ability, so I was content with where I was at. 

 

i got a call from a cousin that saw some pictures of me skiing on facebook. he is an expert skier, so he offered to take me up to mount st. louis moonstone in 2008 and ski/ride with some of his friends. this was my wake up call. first 'black diamond' skied this day, which was quite a jump for me as i didn't even hit a 'blue' before. I guess the defining moment for me was the simple tip my cousin gave me..."lean forward. don't sit in the back seat. and use your poles". from that point on, everything clicked. i progressively got better and better at carving and challenged myself to hit different trails and terrain. After that day at MLSM, i became hooked on skiing. something to the tune of 53 days on the slopes after. during that time, i got to conquer my 'fear' of blue mountain, skiing every trail on the entire mountain. got to to mont tremblant a couple times since then, and skied my first true big mountain black/double black there. and last year, i got the chance to ski my first runs on single black terrain in the west, at whistler alpine bowls and cypress mountain glades. i spent thousands of dollars and got the thrills of my life, and memories to last with many more coming all because of the simple advice of 'don't sit in the back seat'.

 

unfortunately, i left my original ski friends in the dust. lol. i will try to get them inspired to at least go to the top of blue mountain this season. cheers

 

Ad1QevDCIAAvOw_.jpg:large

post #54 of 54

It was in my mid to late 20's.  Thought I was pretty hot stuff. Just thrashing my Colorado ski buddies on every run.  Went to Jackson Hole for the first time.  First day, after a lookie-look down Corbett's I shook my head and then caught the traverse underneath & across to Downhill Chute.  That I can do!  After about a dozen panic jump/check turns I was at the bottom, leaning on my poles & panting, when another skier hits the top of the chute at speed, clears half the chute before touching snow, cuts a couple of super G turns, and is gone.  OhhhKaaay.  Last time I considered myself hot stuff on skis.

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