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Want my own gear!!!

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Basics:

 

Height-5'9

Weight-175lbs

Experience-1 season

Conditions-Groomed, Hard Packed(Skiing in Michigan here)

 

Hello,

 

Was just looking for any input from anyone. Went skiing quite a few times last year, by the end of the season I was able to do black diamond rated hills. I am looking to get my own equipment. Budget that I can spend just on the skis in $50-180. As stated above I ski in michigan so our conditions are goomed and hard packed mostly, but i would prefer an all mountain ski. 

 

Any input much appreciated

Thanks

 

p.s. currently looking at a pair of salomon x-wing 400's and also rossignol bandit b'1s.

post #2 of 12

My advice, and many other bears will give you the same advice... don't focus on skis first. Focus on boots. As the only part of your equipment in direct contact with your body, your boots will have the greatest effect on your skiing enjoyment and your skiing ability. So choose your budget, then go to your local shop and get fitted for a good pair of boots. After that, whatever you have left over can go toward skis.

post #3 of 12

Yup, forget skis.  The saying here is you marry boots and date skis.  You need to find a competent and experienced boot fitter so you are assured you get boots that properly fit your feet, not someone else's feet.  The odds are very high that if you don't deal with a boot fitter you will end up with boots that are 1-2 sizes too big.  That may not sound like a big deal but in skiing it is.  If your boots are too big and you try to initiate a turn, your feet have to move inside the boot before the skis will react.  You will try to compensate for that by buckling them tighter which will only serve to cut off the circulation to your feet making them cold and painful.  How do I know this?  Because that was what I did for years.  When I finally got boots that actually fit, my skiing improved dramatically on the first run.

post #4 of 12

Save up your money and buy PROPER boots.  You will ski like a hero no matter what skis you have after that.  

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

Ok, well since it looks as though I should be focusing on boots first, should I bother looking at used boots or head to the local shop and buy new. Just dont wanna bust my budget on new boots if used will do the job.

 

Thanks

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer333 View Post

Ok, well since it looks as though I should be focusing on boots first, should I bother looking at used boots or head to the local shop and buy new. Just dont wanna bust my budget on new boots if used will do the job.

 

Thanks


The odds of used boots working for you is close to zero.  Just find a good boot fitter and buy new.  Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wikis there about fitting 2-3 times and you will probably know more than the average sales person in most of the chain stores that sell skis.  Also check the list of boot fitters for one near you and if there isn't one, tell us where you live and someone can probably recommend a fitter.

 

post #7 of 12

As much as I'd hate to say it, your budget is......low.  I mean no offense, but it may be wiser for you to save up a little longer.  In the meantime you could rent.  It would be bad for you to rush things and buy garbage, it's just not worth it and would be a waste of your money.  Deals can be found, but skiing does require a minimum level budget.  You may need to increase yours a bit. Don't worry though, there's time.  Look at the bigger picture. smile.gif

post #8 of 12

Consider a season rental--much cheaper (and less hassle) than renting each day, and cheaper than buying new skis. At the end of the season you can either return the gear or, if it's working for you, pay a supplement and keep it.

post #9 of 12

At what point would you say it's worth it to start buying your own rather than renting?

I've got a decent amount (i.e. actually working for a living post college and still single) and I go for a week every mardi gras right now.. but plan on moving to colorado ASAP (actively working towards this goal at work, giving them a year to get it done before I start applying myself) 

Basically what I'm asking is what's the amount of days skied per year that you would stop renting and start buying?

post #10 of 12

I'd say about 3 or 4 days... most will probably say more, but the inconvenience of doing the whole rental thing is just a major pain in the ass IMO.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jumbeauxlaya View Post

Basically what I'm asking is what's the amount of days skied per year that you would stop renting and start buying?



 

post #11 of 12



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jumbeauxlaya View Post

At what point would you say it's worth it to start buying your own rather than renting?

I've got a decent amount (i.e. actually working for a living post college and still single) and I go for a week every mardi gras right now.. but plan on moving to colorado ASAP (actively working towards this goal at work, giving them a year to get it done before I start applying myself) 

Basically what I'm asking is what's the amount of days skied per year that you would stop renting and start buying?


In simple math: if low end new boots, poles, skis, bindings cost $750 and it costs is approx $50 per day to rent skis and boots then it takes about 15 days to reach $750.  If you go 10-15 times per year, you break even within about a year.  You should buy your own stuff.  If you only go 5 days a year, it would take three years to break even.  By then you may want different stuff, so maybe you should rent.

But there are other benefits to having your own gear beyond the math.  You get comfortable with your stuff, you don't have to mess with rental procedures, you get motivated to ski more/better. 
 

 

post #12 of 12

Completely agree.  I sat and did the math and came to the same conclusion this Spring.  Got stuff on Clearance.  Also figured the math of getting 3 sets of skis and 1 snowboard regularly waxed and occasionally tuned......I bought my own tools.  Figure I can make the money back in one year as well.

 

Doesn't take long the recoup the money, plus you'll have it last much longer than one year, plus no waiting in line for rentals, no dealing with crappy rental gear, and the comfort of having your own stuff ready to go anytime you want.  

 

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