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What the hell is a "slarvy" turn? - Page 5

post #121 of 148

post #122 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blake Saunders View Post

 

I like a high energy, athletic, carved turn with minimal sliding.  I don't relate well to some style changes that have come about in recent years in the sport.  To me, a Scot Scmidt or Mike Hattrup turn is more impressive than a new school half-slid turn.  At the time when ski movies showed guys like Hattrup, or Rob Deslauriers, or Kirk Jensen.... there seemed to be a lot more interest in how a person's turn looked.  Nowadays in the movies, it's like if you don't fall between jumps in powder you're doing fine : ) 

 

 

 

See if you can find some Eric Pehota footage over the years as equipment has changed. You'll see a very strong skier taking advantage of whatever gear he's on. The 'slarve'... who care's if it's not a 'carve' but a skid? The point is that with newer gear in deep snow, the rider has the ability to adjust a line (try carving on spines... ain't gonna happen) on the go, and often at full speed particularly when lining up an air. It's just another tool in the box regardless of what it's called. Maybe we could give it an IKEA name... the 'Florp' or something else with a cool umlaut or something over the 'o'. Can we argue about stivot turns now, too? smile.gif

 

 

OOPS! Holy old posts, Batman!!!! Dooooouuh!

post #123 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post



icon14.gif

 

If you're going for style points how bout going for the whole 360 while snorkeling?yahoo.gif

 

It's being done already... have to do it to ski switch in powder. Look up any Andy Mahre (Steve's kid) video... it'll probably have some.

post #124 of 148

Interesting to see this thread get bumped.  Slarving is pretty much the greatest thing ever.  Hold your way through that turn and just release it when you're ready - seriously, so fun.  Those who don't get it, just don't get it.

post #125 of 148

Yep! That's the general idea!

post #126 of 148

post #127 of 148

So I am starting to ski this year in my first rockered ski. So does this = a more slarved turn?

post #128 of 148

And so the gap between skis and skiboards moves inevitably closer..........

post #129 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris holowiski View Post

So I am starting to ski this year in my first rockered ski. So does this = a more slarved turn?

Not necessarily.
post #130 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post


Not necessarily.

 

True.

 

But it might be worth noting that as a general rule, the closer a ski is to reverse/reverse, the slarvier it is. A full reverse/reverse ski of adequate surface area will be very slarvy. A conventional shaped/cambered ski, regardless of width will not be Many. Most modern five-pointish designs with adequate tip and tail rocker, tip and tail taper, and no or modest camber  are reasonably slarvy when you want them to be.

post #131 of 148

Tapered or narrower tails, like on my Head Cyclics, allow almost any kind  turn. Yes, at 60 some of us are slarving from time to time, don't fight it!

 

That ski in the video looks like my HO Mach 1, a friggin' water ski. lol  Does it have a skeg?

post #132 of 148

Friends don't let friends slarve

 

It is so untidy.

 

 

ETA

Bottomless dry powder, and today's skier only wants to sample the top 3 inches.

 

I'm sticking with the full 3D experience!  ;-)

post #133 of 148
Why did I read all 5 pages of this?
post #134 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post

True.

But it might be worth noting that as a general rule, the closer a ski is to reverse/reverse, the slarvier it is. A full reverse/reverse ski of adequate surface area will be very slarvy. A conventional shaped/cambered ski, regardless of width will not be Many. Most modern five-pointish designs with adequate tip and tail rocker, tip and tail taper, and no or modest camber  are reasonably slarvy when you want them to be.

Yup.smile.gif I only chirped in to say that even while easier to slarve as you say, skis can still be skied tip to tail. I like my big skis to be able to do both. Something like a Volkl One crossed the line a bit for me. My big ski is flat under foot, but will still arc nicely in the good stuff.
post #135 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

Why did I read all 5 pages of this?

Because you're not out there slaving?

post #136 of 148
NOPE, bilateral carpal tunnel surgery means no slarving, despite the storms rolling in.
post #137 of 148

Tend to agree with those stating this is a simple question of semantics.  

 

In fact, I think the definition of "Carving" is itself inherently fluid as the way many people ski has changed with changing ski shapes and technology.  With straight skis of yore, it was definitely more of a rapid side to side "shmear" vs. the true reliance on edge and ski shape of today's carving skis.

 

To me, carving is the process of performing relatively quick, technical and well-controlled turns at moderate to high speeds.

 

What I would argue is that there are different STYLES of carving.

post #138 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

NOPE, bilateral carpal tunnel surgery means no slarving, despite the storms rolling in.
Sorry to learn this, but you aren't out there so reading 5 pages of this thread instead.
post #139 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
 

Friends don't let friends slarve

 

It is so untidy.

 

 

ETA

Bottomless dry powder, and today's skier only wants to sample the top 3 inches.

 

I'm sticking with the full 3D experience!  ;-)


This tired falsehood again?

post #140 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post


This tired falsehood again?
I know.
My Bodacious work just as well submarining as on top.
On deep days I see taildraggers wagging down at speed whooping and hollering, they must be doing something right.
post #141 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
 

Friends don't let friends slarve

 

It is so untidy.

 

 

ETA

Bottomless dry powder, and today's skier only wants to sample the top 3 inches.

 

I'm sticking with the full 3D experience!  ;-)


This tired falsehood again?

Right--you can ski the "full 3D experience" and get down in the powder, or you can rip the powder on modern skis and have the powder come up over you.:). Mr. Grandy did give us a winky face though. (Actually--if you look at old videos of powder skiing in the pre-shaped-ski era the skis aren't any deeper in the snow than modern powder skis.)

post #142 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
 

 

True.

 

But it might be worth noting that as a general rule, the closer a ski is to reverse/reverse, the slarvier it is. A full reverse/reverse ski of adequate surface area will be very slarvy. A conventional shaped/cambered ski, regardless of width will not be Many. Most modern five-pointish designs with adequate tip and tail rocker, tip and tail taper, and no or modest camber  are reasonably slarvy when you want them to be.


This....there is no better feeling, than skiing a true reverse/reverse ski in deeper pow.  My best days ever in pow were on Praxis Powder boards.  To bad they sucked on hard pack getting back to the lift or I would have never sold them.  Next best Lhasa Pows.  Maybe someday I can afford some Kusala Pows.

post #143 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post
 


This tired falsehood again?

 

Anyone who would observe the video in the post above will see the sentiment.

 

Perhaps you did not. 

post #144 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Right--you can ski the "full 3D experience" and get down in the powder, or you can rip the powder on modern skis and have the powder come up over you.:). Mr. Grandy did give us a winky face though. (Actually--if you look at old videos of powder skiing in the pre-shaped-ski era the skis aren't any deeper in the snow than modern powder skis.)

 

C'mon!

 

I'm assuming that you must realize that the depth they drop to in the snow, regardless of whether they're pre-shaped or reverse/reverse, depends entirely on about twenty different variables BESIDES the width of the ski. The most important of those are total snow depth, water content of the new snow they're in, base depth (if there is one), wind action, pitch, aspect, and on and on.

 

That said...

 

I can't imagine you're suggesting that if in 1996 I was on 68mm wide, 188cm GS race skis in 32" of new, 4% moisture content snow on top of a snowpack that had been preciously untracked my skis wouldn't drop deeper into the powder than if in 2016 I was on 130mm wide, 188cm reverse/reverse camber skis in exactly the same snow conditions???

post #145 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
 

 

C'mon!

 

I'm assuming that you must realize that the depth they drop to in the snow, regardless of whether they're pre-shaped or reverse/reverse, depends entirely on about twenty different variables BESIDES the width of the ski. The most important of those are total snow depth, water content of the new snow they're in, base depth (if there is one), wind action, pitch, aspect, and on and on.

 

That said...

 

I can't imagine you're suggesting that if in 1996 I was on 68mm wide, 188cm GS race skis in 32" of new, 4% moisture content snow on top of a snowpack that had been preciously untracked my skis wouldn't drop deeper into the powder than if in 2016 I was on 130mm wide, 188cm reverse/reverse camber skis in exactly the same snow conditions???

 

Largely agree. All things being exactly equal, narrower will be deeper. But modern powder skis tend to open up options.  You can get them on top more readily. But you can also keep 'em under. The only string of legit chest deep turns I've had were on my uber-fat slarvy  Praxis Powderboards here in WA -- two days before we skied with you (and lots of others) at the LCC Gathering...

post #146 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post
 


This....there is no better feeling, than skiing a true reverse/reverse ski in deeper pow.  My best days ever in pow were on Praxis Powder boards.  To bad they sucked on hard pack getting back to the lift or I would have never sold them.  Next best Lhasa Pows.  Maybe someday I can afford some Kusala Pows.

Except PM gear is done and gone.

post #147 of 148

Tapered or narrower tails, like on my Head Cyclics, allow almost any kind  turn. Yes, at 60 some of us are slarving from time to time, don't fight it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
 

Friends don't let friends slarve

 

It is so untidy.

 

 

ETA

Bottomless dry powder, and today's skier only wants to sample the top 3 inches.

 

I'm sticking with the full 3D experience!  ;-)

I agree, it should be outlawed on powder days.

post #148 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

Except PM gear is done and gone.

Are my 1st gen Bro Models collectibles now?

I'm sorry to hear PM Gear didn't make it. I liked what they were trying to do.
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