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Bonafide in a 180 or 187

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I ski primarily in the PNW and am an advanced-expert skier, 54 yrs old, 190, 5-10, 20 years skiing, 15-25 times a year. I'm looking for a ski to ski the whole mountain at above average speeds using aggressive turns. I have cronic pain from a serious spine injury 7 years ago but have returned to skiing the past 2 years. any suggestions btwn either the 180 or 187 Bonafide.
post #2 of 20

IMHO, it really depends on what type of terrain you're planning to spend your time on. If you were skiing Crystal, shorter would be the better choice if you spend time off groomed terrain. Lower angle  like Hood and more groomers as a percentage, longer could work if that's the type of skiing you enjoy. All that said, at 50'ish, there aren't many who are as strong and fit as they were at 40 even if you're in good shape and skiing a lot of days. Stepping down a size can lengthen your ski day. 

post #3 of 20

^^^ The above reply puzzles me.  Everything I have read states to go longer, as they ski shorter due to the tip rocker.  I am 5'10" and would buy the 187 for sure. We are similar ages and you have 12 years more skiing experience than me, so ya, buy the 187, especially for off piste conditions and a little pow action.  Cruising groomers, then either will work IMO.

post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post

^^^ The above reply puzzles me.  Everything I have read states to go longer, as they ski shorter due to the tip rocker.  I am 5'10" and would buy the 187 for sure. We are similar ages and you have 12 years more skiing experience than me, so ya, buy the 187, especially for off piste conditions and a little pow action.  Cruising groomers, then either will work IMO.



Then you haven't read everythingwink.gif, I have posted that you don't have to go longer just because the ski has early rise. I am 5'10" 190 and am skiing them in a 180 and haven't felt at all that they were too short. Could I ski them in a 187? Absolutely and I would also like them. But The way I have my quiver set up, the 180 fits better, I have a 190 DPS for the deep days and if I didn't have a big ski, than I would have very well of with the 187, but a blanket statement cannot be said that you HAVE to go longer with these just because there is early rise. 

post #5 of 20

& remember that the Bonafides are not twin tipped and with a regular tail they should/will ski a bit truer to length than a ski like a Volkl Gotama.  They did for me when demoing last spring.

post #6 of 20

Regarding Bonafide, I would like to know from those who tested it how great it is on ice and other hard surfaces. Thanks in advance!

post #7 of 20

Lets be real here, no ski with a rocker and 98 mm under foot will ski truly great on hard ice; this is what the skinny stiff carvers are for.  On the other hand, of all the skis that I tried that were serious fun in soft snow, the Bonafide had the best hard snow performance.  

 

Having said that, I think we need to cut through the hype and get real- no ski is going to be a do-it-all all-category killer.   We have been through that- "buy a Mantra, it slices and dices, and you will look like a stud everywhere"- this is BS.  If you ski primarily eastern ice, you don't need a Bonafide, you need something like an 8.7 or a Tigershark.  If you live in Alaska and ski powder faces all winter, you don't need a Bonafide, you need a Pontoon, Shiro, or Atlas.   Those are two extremes, and, granted, Bonafide is a ski that can do a fair part of each with confidence.  It is great for a variable condition Western mountain where you can ski ice in the morning, soft crud midday, slush in the afternoon and an occasional powder stash in between.   It is a great all-arounder, but still with a lot of necessary compromises thrown in.  It just does those compromises extremely well.  If you predominantly ski one type of terrain, don't buy an all-arounder, buy a ski that is specialized for that terrain.  

   

post #8 of 20

It's the old swiss army knife or hack saw conundrum -  especially on the ice in the East where I ski most of the time.  These days I tend to hit the ice at the bar when the real snow gets plowed off early season wise.  And, I do have some ice carvers for those knarly days. 

 

But, most of the skiers that I know have one pair of current "swiss army" type skis and several pairs of older too narrow one of a different kind of ski in their arsenals.  Not all are lucky enough to have a multi-ski quiver of many different types of skis.

post #9 of 20

I haven't skied the Bonafide, and it gets glowing reviews from many good skiers on this site.

 

However I have tried the Nordica Enforcer and the Salomon Sentinel, and found that both of these could work for a big mtn all-rounder..98/95 mm waists....a few alternatives perhaps, and less expensive as they can be had at last season's $$s.

 

BTW...I am older and lighter-weight than you

post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cur-pe-gheata View Post

Regarding Bonafide, I would like to know from those who tested it how great it is on ice and other hard surfaces. Thanks in advance!



It is OK, but ice really isn't it's forte.  It isn't a stiff ski, and doesn't hold up as well as my MX98 on hard snow, which itself isn't that great, as it doesn't have metal.  Something like a Sollie Sentinel or one of the new Heads is going to be better on hard snow in that width range.  The Bonafide is more suited to soft snow, crud, soft bumps; that is really where it comes alive. It doesn't have the GS heft of some of the other skis, is more playful in those types of snow conditions, which is why it is so much fun to ski.

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

Then you haven't read everythingwink.gif, I have posted that you don't have to go longer just because the ski has early rise. I am 5'10" 190 and am skiing them in a 180 and haven't felt at all that they were too short. Could I ski them in a 187? Absolutely and I would also like them. But The way I have my quiver set up, the 180 fits better, I have a 190 DPS for the deep days and if I didn't have a big ski, than I would have very well of with the 187, but a blanket statement cannot be said that you HAVE to go longer with these just because there is early rise. 



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post

^^^ The above reply puzzles me.  Everything I have read states to go longer, as they ski shorter due to the tip rocker.  I am 5'10" and would buy the 187 for sure. We are similar ages and you have 12 years more skiing experience than me, so ya, buy the 187, especially for off piste conditions and a little pow action.  Cruising groomers, then either will work IMO.


 

I skied the 187cm last spring a bunch, great ski, good length for me.  If i were skiing primarily bumps and trees, then I would perhaps look at the 180cm. Here, it is wide open and fast skiing all day, so 187cm gets the nod.   Even that length is easy to ski. A few years ago, I probably would have opted for shorter most of the time, but I can pressure the tips of my skis better these days (I am a much better skier now than I used to be) and don't find the longer length to be trouble.  Kevin, who is much larger than me (4 inches and 45lbs) also skied that 187cm and thought it was a good length; we are similar skill levels on the snow. I guess it depends on what your needs are.

 

post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by nfp158 View Post

However I have tried the Nordica Enforcer and the Salomon Sentinel, and found that both of these could work for a big mtn all-rounder..98/95 mm waists....a few alternatives perhaps, and less expensive as they can be had at last season's $$s.


Sure, they could but if you ski ice all day why would you want to use anything but a dedicated carver? 

 

BTW, wrong forum, it should be in the Gear, not gear reviews. 

post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

It is OK, but ice really isn't it's forte.  It isn't a stiff ski, and doesn't hold up as well as my MX98 on hard snow, which itself isn't that great, as it doesn't have metal.  Something like a Sollie Sentinel or one of the new Heads is going to be better on hard snow in that width range.  The Bonafide is more suited to soft snow, crud, soft bumps; that is really where it comes alive. It doesn't have the GS heft of some of the other skis, is more playful in those types of snow conditions, which is why it is so much fun to ski.


Thanks Dawg.

What do you think about The One, would it be better on ice than Bonafide? I know The One has no metal inside but it has camber, sidewall and IQ max which I think may provide some extra stiffness (torsional and longitudinal)...

 

post #14 of 20


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cur-pe-gheata View Post

Thanks Dawg.

What do you think about The One, would it be better on ice than Bonafide? I know The One has no metal inside but it has camber, sidewall and IQ max which I think may provide some extra stiffness (torsional and longitudinal)...

 


I think you have is backwards.  The One is a flat camber, Bones have real camber in addition to rocker.  The Bone should be a better carver in theory, but none of those skis will be a true carver.  Why don't you tell us where you ski and how? 

 

post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post
Why don't you tell us where you ski and how? 


Also about what size you are. The design of the One makes it a decent ski on ice or hardpack for lighter skiers, doubt it will win any awards for same among heavier folks. But as Alexzn says, none of these skis are serious carvers, in the sense of something in the 78-84 range, for instance. 

 

post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cur-pe-gheata View Post

Thanks Dawg.

What do you think about The One, would it be better on ice than Bonafide? I know The One has no metal inside but it has camber, sidewall and IQ max which I think may provide some extra stiffness (torsional and longitudinal)...

 



That is really tough to say. I didn't ski them back to back on ice.  Probably pretty similar.  It was warm most of the days I skied The One, when I did get it into frozen crust, it was pretty manageable.  If you want an ice-skate, wider ski, best to look at something with metal though.  My BMX98 I tried on pure ice last year as well, 'bout blew my knee out in the process.  Laid the skis way over, and wasn't ready for what happened next.  The Stockli SX's I had just taken off my feet were a bit more reliable that morning....  I mention it as it is similar in stiffness to the Bonafide, although made differently.  Maybe Josh can chime in, as he skis The One a lot back East, where they see real ice.  

 

Are you referring to what we call "Ice" around here (which is rarely that) or the stuff they see back East after a rain storm?  Not that we don't get rain, but it usually changes to snow before it freezes and ends up being pretty ski-able.   

post #17 of 20

Thanks a lot guys. I'm pretty big (230 lbs & 6.1 feet), quite aggressive (when not skiing in touring boots - touring boots suck) and I ski in Romania, in places where crust, ice and other unfriendly surfaces are at home and true powder is very seldom (a couple of times per season). Looking for a playful ski to mount my Duke on (for touring purposes), without metal but with a good edge grip and medium flex within 94-102 width range. 

Bonafide doesn't sound like an ideal choice and suddenly The One came on my radar yesterday after reading several posts here on epicski and I admit their IQ binding system looks very useful.

As dawg said Head (Rock n Roll - 187) could be an option, Movement has one or two suitable models, Elan Spire (187 - maybe not that playful, I know) could be a target too if I would find its weight, Nordica Hell and Back and the list remains open.

 

Alex, you are right about the camber; my mistake...

 

 

post #18 of 20

One of the best known ski shops in the country's advice on length is within the range that is appropriate for your size and weight you should buy the length that is comfortable at the fastest speed you want to ski since on most skis you trade stability for maneuverability. I can not speak to the Bonafide but have really enjoyed my TheOne.

I'm 6'1" 170lb and ski TheOne in the 177 length. I bought it as a Powder Ski to replace some 172/85s but I find I ski TheOne's everywhere almost every day at Big Sky. Admittedly I do not do ice but they seem fine on hardpack at the speeds I travel. I think the early rise makes it easier to turn without really making it ski shorter-as in less stable.

post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

That is really tough to say. I didn't ski them back to back on ice.  Probably pretty similar.  It was warm most of the days I skied The One, when I did get it into frozen crust, it was pretty manageable.  If you want an ice-skate, wider ski, best to look at something with metal though.  My BMX98 I tried on pure ice last year as well, 'bout blew my knee out in the process.  Laid the skis way over, and wasn't ready for what happened next.  The Stockli SX's I had just taken off my feet were a bit more reliable that morning....  I mention it as it is similar in stiffness to the Bonafide, although made differently.  Maybe Josh can chime in, as he skis The One a lot back East, where they see real ice.  

 

Are you referring to what we call "Ice" around here (which is rarely that) or the stuff they see back East after a rain storm?  Not that we don't get rain, but it usually changes to snow before it freezes and ends up being pretty ski-able.   



I have skied "the one" alot. With the right edge and the right timing you can do some pretty serious carving on it. With that said once the edge go dull its is pretty useless compared to say my 8.7 or bushwackers.

 

I also feel that the bushwacker and bonafide both skis ice much better than the one. But the one is still their best tree ski. I have yet to ski the Cochise on the east coast but I feel that out west it had great edge grip on ice, but was hurting my knees more than other ski that width for some reason.

 

still not sure what I m getting this year, but I would get the Bonafide in a 187 if I got it. will be waiting for the new flip core twins and will probably get one of those in a lower 180s lenght when they come out.  the bonafide lends it self more to serious skiing so I feel I should get longer where skis like 'the one" were never serious to start and a short lenght for me increase the fun factor.

post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thank you EVERYONE for your well thought out replies. After reviewing all the replies and speaking with a good friend and sales pro at Sturdevant's in Bellevue (Gil S.), WA, I went with the Bonafide in the 180 length. Since I own an S7 in a 188 for deep days and several pairs of GS skis,ranging from a Rossi 181 to a Fischer race stock in a 193, not to mention a Dynastar contact 11 in a 172, I wasn't looking for a one quiver ski. I know some of this extra info changes what some of you might have replied-and for that I apologize. Every reply was helpful and much appreciated.

I am so impressed with the knowledge base here on epicski! THANK YOU!
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