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Time for all real skiers to hit up the Backcountry

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

There is an elitism emerging among a class of skiers. Backcountry skiers, And it is earned. Uphill mobility is a skill. As is survival in storm conditions. Hats (wool caps) off!

 

But most of the time, these elite skiers are lapping the resort, their floatation packs saving some closet debris. Let's pick it up guys. I don't want to see your sorry soft sagging asses in bounds ever again, taking the easy way, being common and weak. If you're still standing in lift lines when I'm out, don't tell me how bad ass you are, how much better than everyone elseyahoo.gif, how aerobically invulnerable, how brave and knowledgeable, how skilled at walking uphill. Cause if you're in bounds sucking up one breath of resort oxygen and skiing one foot of ski patrol managed snownonono2.gif, I'm not buyin' iticon13.gif. Head out. Go far. Make a difference: shorten the lift lines, reduce the crowds, quit shredding all the snow     biggrin.gif, you are capable of real skiing    beercheer.gif, out there.

 

just wondering if b.c. skiing can ever become popular enough to reduce resort over-crowding on powder days, and doing my part to encourage people to get out and hike. wink.gif

post #2 of 29

At Mt. Baker they shred the inbounds first and then at about 11:30 or so they head out of bounds to cut up the rest.  It looks like a caravan headed up the hill.  I've not noticed a difference in lift lines, but the more challenging terrain inbounds becomes much more empty in the afternoon.

 

Me, I'm too lazy to go hiking up the hill.  I'll stay back and ski the leftover crud and have plenty of fun.

post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 

One of the best ideas....^^^ becoming relevant due to powder crowds, is that skiing cut up snow (crud, perhaps) is awesome. If you can do it, and enjoy it, you get so many more good runs.  icon14.gif  biggrin.gif and smile a lot more. 

 

I'm limited to about 15 minute boot packs off the top of a chair, also, not making any claims personally in that area. joining you for leftovers, just don't call me late for dinner, wink.gif, somehow that's funny to meth_dunno-1[1].gifroflmao.gif.

post #4 of 29

roflmao.gif

post #5 of 29
post #6 of 29

I approve of the title, but don't really understand the OP... care to explain?

 

Here it seems that you are best off skiing the resort while its dumping since the snow takes a day or more to stabilize normally.

post #7 of 29


That was funny.


Edited by tromano - 10/16/11 at 10:06am
post #8 of 29
Thread Starter 

I'm waiting for a new trend to relieve crowding, and jokingly shoving people out the trail head, but it's tongue in cheek mostly, never an area of skiing that can attract very many people, it's just to tough in reality.

post #9 of 29
post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 

those are great. I enjoy satire that includes everyone, no one escapes, we're all vulnerable to not being cool enough.

 

edit: just too weird


Edited by davluri - 10/18/11 at 9:22pm
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

those are great. I enjoy satire that includes everyone, no one escapes, we're all vulnerable to not being cool enough.

 

When I enter their space, I really don't make much effort at being cool. My skis are 100 wide, I wear a helmet and rigid boots. Once so vain, I can't seem to care anymore, thus the helmet thing when hiking that is so anti-cool.  I do laugh now at people getting so snobby because they can walk up hill pretty fast. Not exactly a skill thing, is it? Look at me: I have high pain tolerance. coming through cycling, it is odd that I have let that go so completely.



so zen this is, maybe

post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 

yeah, that sounds pretty stupid, but not cosmic...

post #13 of 29

JF, that was fantastic "After all, I have adjustable poles."  And "Free your arms, free your soul."

 

Mike

post #14 of 29

On a ski trip to Red Mt last winter i rode up the chair with a long time local who claimed that Red's back country is now overcrowded. I have friends who moved to Whistler years ago but now don't buy season passes. Instead they use sleds for accessing the bc and if they get to a favourite spot that is already "in use" they simply sled to the next valley.

 

As for me, I don't bc, instead I ride a chairlift that almost no one uses mid week, even on powder days, and it covers 2900' vert of mostly black diamond runs.yahoo.gif

post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

those are great. I enjoy satire that includes everyone, no one escapes, we're all vulnerable to not being cool enough.

 

When I enter their space, I really don't make much effort at being cool. My skis are 100 wide, I wear a helmet and rigid boots. Once so vain, I can't seem to care anymore, thus the helmet thing when hiking that is so anti-cool.  I do laugh now at people getting so snobby because they can walk up hill pretty fast. Not exactly a skill thing, is it? Look at me: I have high pain tolerance. coming through cycling, it is odd that I have let that go so completely.


eh I would say that fast uphill hikers can ski more powder in day than a slow uphill hiker.

 

I actually take a really twisted joy in seeing how many different people I can wear out in a given day.

 

4ster I lol, thanks fully noone is dropping bombs on Mansifield!

 

post #16 of 29

"I don't ski resorts unless they're closed" - haha!

post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 

Wearing people out with superior uphill mobility just doesn't involve any skill; it's a physical fact of youthful health that carries over from what attributes you are born with. So it appeals to young people with their aerobic capacity in tact. We all have that capacity at one point in our lives, and we all lose it somewhere down the road. So where's the joy? twisted for sure.

 

We have kids at Squaw that already get all that. They are courteous toward me on the bootpacks, and it is amazing at their age. They are honoring my skiing, not just my white hair. They will respect my hiking pace and not pass me up (even though they easily could) in some situations simply to give me some space (and time). That most of them come through several coaching programs here is why they have assimilated a high level of slope etiquette, IMO.

 

There are ways to pass people on a hike that are completely fine, don't get me wrong. Leaving ego out of it is a good start, however.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

eh I would say that fast uphill hikers can ski more powder in day than a slow uphill hiker.

 

I actually take a really twisted joy in seeing how many different people I can wear out in a given day.

 

4ster I lol, thanks fully noone is dropping bombs on Mansifield!

 



 

post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 

I had a smile from this sort of thing once. I played my cards right from 40 skiers back in line one powder morning and got to the top of a big face first. Earlier that week, someone had done a dawn patrol hike and skied the line I was looking down at. I could just barely see dents in the snow from their tracks under 16" of new. I was lucky. I got to ski it untracked also, from the lift. I guess it was a smile, because I know it is a prime line if you are willing to hike up 2,000 vertical at 6 in the morning to ski it untracked.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

"I don't ski resorts unless they're closed" - haha!



 

post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Wearing people out with superior uphill mobility just doesn't involve any skill; it's a physical fact of youthful health that carries over from what attributes you are born with. So it appeals to young people with their aerobic capacity in tact. We all have that capacity at one point in our lives, and we all lose it somewhere down the road. So where's the joy? twisted for sure.

 

We have kids at Squaw that already get all that. They are courteous toward me on the bootpacks, and it is amazing at their age. They are honoring my skiing, not just my white hair. They will respect my hiking pace and not pass me up (even though they easily could) in some situations simply to give me some space (and time). That most of them come through several coaching programs here is why they have assimilated a high level of slope etiquette, IMO.

 

There are ways to pass people on a hike that are completely fine, don't get me wrong. Leaving ego out of it is a good start, however. 

 




I strongly disgree I am far from peaking from endurance stand point, for instance the best enduro SS in the country is 45 years old.

 

There are very few people compared to say squaw or snowbird that hike for turns here mostly because most do not know how good it is.

post #20 of 29

All joking aside, I think it's pretty clear based on a lot of the bindings coming out from companies like Atomic and Salomon (same binding, different color?) that touring is about to explode in popularity over the next 5 years.

post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 

"far" is a nice illusion. I think our hormones dictate that we live with it.

post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

"far" is a nice illusion. I think our hormones dictate that we live with it.



There is a reason that the top triathletes are in their 30's, generally their late 30's:  capilarization.  It takes a long time to develop the endurance and physical adaptations (notably the development of capillaries) that support long endurance events.  Josh, while he is in shape for a 20 something, will gain endurance if he continues an active lifestyle.  Interestingly, in "Born to Run" the author identifies the age at which an endurance runner hits their same level of performance as when they were 19.  Know what age that is?

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

63

 

post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

All joking aside, I think it's pretty clear based on a lot of the bindings coming out from companies like Atomic and Salomon (same binding, different color?) that touring is about to explode in popularity over the next 5 years.


Cart <-- Horse

 

If it were going to explode, it would have by now... These are just another nice options to have. But are far less market changing than the duke was when it was released. 

 

The Duke I think of it as a 16 din resort binding with a touring mode. If these new choices are as good as advertised its an incremental improvement over the dukes. These would be more tourable... But people were not touring on their dukes all that much to begin with. I think people who buy bindings in ths segment are those who want minimal touring functionality and will not compromise DH performance period. They are the occasional / short tourers / slack country guys who want something that skis nice in the resort and use lifts (or sleds) as a primary mode of transit even when they are "touring".  I never see dukes in the BC skin track other than my own when I rarely tour on my set. Its just not a popular touring binding for human powered transit in the BC that I have seen. I don't think these new designs will have a big impact on that behaviour.

 

I don't think they will convert too many fritschi owners right away (those who had not first become duke owners) until the weight comes down and their designs are proven in the field for a few years, especially given Salomon's "haunted past" in the touring segment.  I am waiting for the wildsnow review.


Edited by tromano - 10/17/11 at 9:26pm
post #24 of 29

Agreed - my point was, it seems like every company is trying to get a piece of the action now, which must mean something in terms of overall market demand.  Would you not agree that AT is currently (and will continue to) grow rapidly?

post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

Agreed - my point was, it seems like every company is trying to get a piece of the action now, which must mean something in terms of overall market demand.  Would you not agree that AT is currently (and will continue to) grow rapidly?

 

There is alot of money to made selling people stuff they don't need / don't use. Marker had a cozy little niche that is now a bit more crowded. From what I see the gear is alot more popular than the use of it. Its like "mountain bikes". Most people just ride them around the block, if they ride them at all.


I think the bigger market changer in the touring segment is the new burly 120 flex boots that have been coming out in the last couple of years. Hopefully between these and the new binding options, it will drive the prices down to saner levels.

 

Now all we need is some cut rake skin mfg to come in and shake things up. :)

 

The local touring scene here is alot different than what it is down in the central Wasatch (or I am sure in Tahoe). So maybe these are toured on more than I think they are.

 

post #26 of 29

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

Agreed - my point was, it seems like every company is trying to get a piece of the action now, which must mean something in terms of overall market demand.  Would you not agree that AT is currently (and will continue to) grow rapidly?


That theory seems to have some support:

http://www.google.com/search?q=alpine+touring+fastest+growing+market

 

post #27 of 29

That video is hilarious!  Did you make it?

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Altanaut View Post

That video is hilarious!  Did you make it?

No, I can only wish that I was that clever.  Just spreading the luv.

 

JF
 

 

 

post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 

those clips are good for a second viewing, laughed my a$$ off, again.  thx JF, can't let elitism go un-messed-with.

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