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Atomic RT TI R 160

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

I got a the RT TI R 160 boot for the upcoming race season. The sole needs to be planted apparantly as it is thicker (+5mm) than normal. Footloose in Mammoth (if any of you guys know them) said that it costs about 80 bucks to cut it down and 80 to plant a new sole to it. Has anyone here done this. Is the price OK and also is it recommended to add a new sole at the bottom or just plant it down?

 

thanks,

Kaveh

post #2 of 7



If it is a current year boot, it should meet standheight requirements.

 

Good lord, that thing will be beastly, how much do you weigh and how tall are you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by kavehdr View Post

Hi,

 

I got a the RT TI R 160 boot for the upcoming race season. The sole needs to be planted apparantly as it is thicker (+5mm) than normal. Footloose in Mammoth (if any of you guys know them) said that it costs about 80 bucks to cut it down and 80 to plant a new sole to it. Has anyone here done this. Is the price OK and also is it recommended to add a new sole at the bottom or just plant it down?

 

thanks,

Kaveh



 

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

Its not an all day ski boot for sure. I need it for my race days mostly. But I will see how I can flex it. I was flexing my previous 130 boot to mush that's why I wanted to get something super hard. I am not too big 5'10, 165 lbs but I do hit the gym every day for 2 hours hard dryland training so I should be in solid shape to power the boot. It's not set to FIS standards. In the catalog it also says it has to be cut down. This is a 2010 RT TI R with 95 last :)

 

Any ideas on the numbers $ I ran by you guys and whether to use a new sole and screw it down there once it is cut to FIS height standards?

post #4 of 7


$$ sounds reasonable. After planing I assume they are installing toe and heel lugs that provide some traction and are replaceable when worn down.

 

One note, when my son was racing he had the original RT 150 in a Medium Flex and they were absolute bricks. He is and was a hell of lot bigger then you!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kavehdr View Post

Its not an all day ski boot for sure. I need it for my race days mostly. But I will see how I can flex it. I was flexing my previous 130 boot to mush that's why I wanted to get something super hard. I am not too big 5'10, 165 lbs but I do hit the gym every day for 2 hours hard dryland training so I should be in solid shape to power the boot. It's not set to FIS standards. In the catalog it also says it has to be cut down. This is a 2010 RT TI R with 95 last :)

 

Any ideas on the numbers $ I ran by you guys and whether to use a new sole and screw it down there once it is cut to FIS height standards?



 


Edited by Atomicman - 10/15/11 at 10:27am
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

Haha I know they are made to be super hard. This one is even made of different material; it is HI/B. I have a week long race camp first week of December in Mammoth. I will update this thread of what I think of them for SL/GS. But again this is not an all day boot so its supposed to be uncomfortable and close to the skin. Also weight and height are not the only factors as you probably know that could affect how well you could handle a boot; ski level, agressiveness, etc. also matter as much. I think you are right the toe and heel piece are probably for durability reasons and if worn out I could replace them although I do use cattracks when out of the bindings. I think they take materials off of the heel actually and not from the inside shell, that's I think what the manual said if I remember correctly anyways. I actually have a pair of Booster straps that I used with my other boot. After trying this one out I dont think I will be putting those on this :)

post #6 of 7



Hi/B is the Flex not the material.

 

Good luck, let us know how the modify the boot and how it skis!

 

I am skiing in the Head Raptor 150 Wc (se to 140) with a Booster

Quote:
Originally Posted by kavehdr View Post

Haha I know they are made to be super hard. This one is even made of different material; it is HI/B. I have a week long race camp first week of December in Mammoth. I will update this thread of what I think of them for SL/GS. But again this is not an all day boot so its supposed to be uncomfortable and close to the skin. Also weight and height are not the only factors as you probably know that could affect how well you could handle a boot; ski level, agressiveness, etc. also matter as much. I think you are right the toe and heel piece are probably for durability reasons and if worn out I could replace them although I do use cattracks when out of the bindings. I think they take materials off of the heel actually and not from the inside shell, that's I think what the manual said if I remember correctly anyways. I actually have a pair of Booster straps that I used with my other boot. After trying this one out I dont think I will be putting those on this :)



 

post #7 of 7

"Hi" is the plastic code used in the lower shell, "b" is the plastic code used in the cuff. Hi/B is the stiffest boot available from the Rennstall Catalog, and is (based on the same scale as rest of the numbered scale) a 200 flex. It is a common flex for the World Cup racers. I used this model for a few seasons and had to soften it. I'm 6'3 and 245.

 

H/a is the next softer flex and is closer to 180.

 

The extra 5mm on the sole is to raise the boot so higher edge angles can be achieved. The boot board might need to be lowered to meet the 43mm max height FIS has regulated. Additional riser plates are available, but the boot board needs to come down even lower. Only the toe and heel lugs need to be routered to DIN height so they work in the bindings. Look for a shop that uses Keyser Tools for their fitting. The Keyser router is almost idiot proof.

 

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