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Requesting a lot of info, answers needed quick.

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I know the information which I’m requesting in this thread is probably findable using google and this site – which I just found out by the way, and it’s great! – but I just like to be certain of myself when I make decisions like this.

 

Ok so here is the deal:

I’m 19 years old, just graduated and 2 months into my gap-year at the moment.

I love skiing and you can take my word when I say I’m pretty good at it, even though I’m from the Netherlands.

In this gap year my plan is to become a skiing instructor so that I can ski for a long time, instead of just 2 weeks a year, which I usually do..

The instructor course is already set out, if all goes well I will have my “Anwärter” on the 24th of December.

This allows me to teach in Austria.

 

Now I had a few questions which I would like answers to. You can click to open them and few the full information. You don’t need to answer each question of course.

 

1. What ski’s should I get?

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 I broke the tip of one of my old ski’s last holiday so I need new ski’s. I love freeriding but also tend to carve a lot. And especially as I will be teaching a lot I think I need some good carving ski’s but I don’t really want them to hold down on my free-ride/freestyle time when I don’t have to teach.. 

 

2. Shoes?

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I already got a nice pair of shoes that fit me well, and they don’t really feel uncomfortable. Although taking them off after an intensive day of skiing is always a relief.. So any reason why I should get a new pair anyway? 

 

3. Helmet?

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 So my old helmet is broken a bit, the right ear flap thingy keeps letting go. So I need a new one, anything I should pay attention to?

 

 4. Helmet cam?

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I was planning on recording some of my leisure time on the slopes. I am planning on buying a gopro with a helmet and chesty mount and maybe even a ski mount. Any other products I should might take a look at? 

 

5. So where in Austria should I apply for a job?

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I would like a big resort, high altitude as I would like to have a good change of good snow conditions for my time being. And especially being able to free-ride off-piste without having to worrying about rocks, cliffs and holes and such that much. Other than that cheap lodging and being and nice night-life are optional. 

 

 

6. Free-ride trip?

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 I will be in Austria from 17th December ti’ll about 18th of February. I imagine there is one or 2 weeks where I won’t be needed as an instructor. I am planning on going on some free-ride trip then. The only problem is that a lot of sites offer this but I don’t know which ones to take. I would really like some challenging stuff, any personal experiences/recommendations on this?

 

 I’m guessing this is all. I had a much longer thread set-up with much more info but I forgot to save it so now I lost it.

If you still feel like you need more information to answer my question don’t hesitate to ask though.

Apart from that I would like to thank you all for reading and many, many thanks in advanced for answering just one question(Answering more isn't forbidden...:P).

 

Greetings,

Diethert

post #2 of 10

For the skis, I'd recommend going with a wider freestyle ski with a reasonably short turn radius (90mm or more and 20-m sidecut or less). Something like the Line Chronic, K2 Recoil, Atomic Theory, Rossignol S3, Line Blend or K2 Kung Fujas, depending on how wide you want to go. It just depends on your preferences.

 

For the boots, you might just need them adjusted a bit. A bootfitter might be able to work some magic for you without you having to buy a new pair. I'd try that first.

 

Helmet: comfort and fit are most important. Take your goggles with you when trying on new ones so you can make sure they fit comfortably with the shape of the helmet.

 

Where to work and where to ski: there are so many options. You could apply at the big resorts like St. Anton and Ischgl, just in case you get lucky. But most likely, one of the smaller resorts will be where you end up. You might want to browse a bunch of ski resort guides to get an idea of what's available. You can check out the guides here, on the Ski Club of GB site, Where to Ski and Snowboard, and Skiinfo.com.

 

 


Edited by CerebralVortex - 10/13/11 at 2:26am
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the quick reply.

Those ski's look and sound good, but do they also carve good enough so that I can properly show my students how to carve?

 

A bootfitter? I'm hoping every regular sportshop in the alps has such a guy? If so, thanks for the tip:)

 

hm I'll just look around on where to work then. Also, why am I lucky if I get a job in st. anton or ischl? Just because it are big resorts?

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diethert View Post

Thanks for the quick reply.

Those ski's look and sound good, but do they also carve good enough so that I can properly show my students how to carve?

 

A bootfitter? I'm hoping every regular sportshop in the alps has such a guy? If so, thanks for the tip:)

 

hm I'll just look around on where to work then. Also, why am I lucky if I get a job in st. anton or ischl? Just because it are big resorts?


As long as you don't go too long on those skis, the turn radius should be short enough for you to do demonstrations while teaching. The skinnier ones like the Chronic and Recoil would be best for that, while the wider ones will be better for your freeriding time.

 

Most big resorts will have a couple of shops with professional bootfitters. Just ask around and you should find one.

 

St. Anton and Ischgl are big, popular resorts, so I would imagine they get a lot of applications at the ski schools. But, there are tons of resorts in Austria to choose from, so you should be able to find a job somewhere.

 

post #5 of 10

If you're going out there to work, get you skis and equipment at a discount from the instructor friendly shop. Also often there are good deals on rentals so you don't need to buy and can pick up a pair to suit the conditions and what terrain you are skiing that day, that week. 

 

The shops just ask that you point your client their way.

 

 

 

post #6 of 10

Instead of a helmet camera, a friend who is a ski instructor bought a hand held camera with a lot of zoom and decent size viewer screen. He uses it to take vids of his students and then shows them the replay on the chair or on slope. I'm guessing that the video record of a students lesson just might earn my friend an extra tip or two.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

 

Sorry for the late reply, I've been very busy lately.
 
Your replies were very usefull though, especially the on from Dano, it's probably very usefull to show my students their own skiing.
 
As for the ski's my parents seemed to be generous because they felt like rewarding my initiative of doing this ski-ing thing:). As we have pretty good contacts at our local sport shop (regulary intersport) they insisted we bought a pair of ski's overthere.
It ended up with a pair of Salomon Lord's. I couldn't figure out if they were 2011 or 2012 though.. but any thoughts on those ski's?
 
I also have applied at a couple of places and I pretty much immediately got a reply from a ski school in Ischgl which seems to be a great resort too. Almost similair to St. Anton. As I haven't heard anything of St. Anton for a week I accepted the job over there.
 
I will be working in Ischgl from 18 december ti'll 12 january.
Then I will have a monnth break after wich I will continue from 13th of february ti'll 29th of february.
 
During this month break I am planning on staying in Ischl, the ski school offered me a room over there for just 15 dollars a day including a ski-pass if I decided to stay during that month of not working.
 
In this time I will probably go a lot on solo ski-ing. 
I want to work on my off-piste technique and I was wondering if ischl offers good offpiste? Is it safe to ski there solo, do you think there will be enough snow (at high altitude), I'm aiming at snow about 60cm at least.
 
So, how is the off-piste in general in Ischgl?
 
If it's not that good I might move somewhere else in the alps for 1 or 2 weeks, can you recommend a good resort for off-piste in that case?
 
Thanks in advanced
post #8 of 10

I think you'll be more than happy in Ischgl, they have 230+ km inbounds and a friend who goes there often says there's plenty of runs off piste. I wouldn't go out of bounds alone, though - securitywise it's not really smart, if you have a fall and brake a leg, who's gonna call for help?

 

Good luck in the Alps!


Edited by madMads - 10/22/11 at 11:17am
post #9 of 10

You need two pairs of skis. 

 

As a new instructor you will have a lot of beginners who constantly ski over your skis and crash into your bindings.  The instructor skis will get trashed in a hurry - buy used ( cheap! ) and do not get too attached to them  Also, shorter is better as you will be very close to your students most of the time. Short skis allow better manueverability around the students while you are assisting them.

 

For your personal skiing days  get a decent all mountain or carving ski.  Europeans are more sensible in their ski choices and tend to get narrower skis.  European snow conditions are different than American and American conditions vary widely.  Buy skis that meet the conditions that are usually encountered ( 90% groomed and/or hard), not the conditions you rarely encounter ( powder).

 

Good luck, instructing can be a lot of fun.  If it isn't fun you picked the wrong thing to do.

 

 

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgrezmer View Post

Buy skis that meet the conditions that are usually encountered ( 90% groomed and/or hard), not the conditions you rarely encounter ( powder).

 

 

 


That's strange, I've been on 8 trips in the Alps and have only had one where I didn't run into whiteout conditions at some point during the week. The first time I went to Val d'Isere, the entire mountain was shut the first day because of the avalanche danger from the recent dumps (avalanches reaching street level in some parts of town). Even last winter, which wasn't all that great for snow, about 4 or 5 of my 12 days in the Alps were snow days; not huge dumps, but enough snow to cut visibility down dramatically and keep off-piste conditions nice for another couple of days. I've never had much difficulty in finding powder somewhere on the mountain.

 

That's not to say Ischgl will get constant dumps every week. But, it's not going to be sunny skies every day. In fact, the biggest challenge I found in skiing the Alps is learning to ski blind because so much of the terrain is above tree level and so many days have low clouds or snow storms.

 

I'd suggest getting a pair of skis that can run over/through unseen bumps and unexpected patches of soft snow you might encounter on a whiteout day, something you'd feel comfortable on when skiing blind.


Edited by CerebralVortex - 10/24/11 at 4:10am
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