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First Tune On New Skis Question.

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

So the hill I primarily ski at is touting they have purchased a Montana International Challenge tuning machine.  I have never heard of the machine.  Can someone tell me if it is worth running my skis through it for the first tune?

 

 

Thanks

post #2 of 21

Well I googled it and that is one awesome piece of hi tech machinery. I would say to give em a try.

post #3 of 21

Do your skis need to be machine tuned?  If yes give this machine a try.  If no wax them and be ready for the snow.

post #4 of 21

Do they have somebody who knows how to operate it?

post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 

I sure hope so.  Maybe I will give them some time on the machine to work out the kinks.  

post #6 of 21

The all in one machines like that are good, IF the techs maintain the settings.

 

I personally would only do base bevel by hand-  I have seen too many come off

machine beveling with too much or too little- or one edge only!

 

In those cases it is clear the techs are just trusting the machine to always be perfectly calibrated

and are not checking the final product.

 

SVST base bevel guide is the only way, and trust me, base bevel changes are

something you would feel immediately.

 

We use Montana machines in my shop and they are great.  We also hand finish

base bevel, and hand shape and sharpen side edges if it is a race tune.

 

I use the side edge machine on my own skis and they are fine for out west, if was

back east I would probably polish them more, but then again, if I was back east, I

probably wouldn't ski!

post #7 of 21

I wouldn't machine any brand new skis.  The pre tune should be done by hand and very lightly then waxed and scraped.  In the old days they shipped skis stacked and intentionally left extra p-tex on the bases to seperate them and keep then from scratching eachother up.  These days they come pretty ready to go from what I hear. Try them out they way they came before trying anything major.

post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I wouldn't machine any brand new skis.  The pre tune should be done by hand and very lightly then waxed and scraped.  In the old days they shipped skis stacked and intentionally left extra p-tex on the bases to seperate them and keep then from scratching eachother up.  These days they come pretty ready to go from what I hear. Try them out they way they came before trying anything major.


He didn't say his skis were new.  I once asked Pat at PM Gear why I would feel like one ski was taking off (out and away) on me.  He replied although a new ski, perhaps the new tune wasn't so good, so to have them tuned.  Others have also mentioned Dynastars coming in with less than optimal base tunes right out of the plastic. I am very reluctant to machine tune a new pair of skis, but others have suggested sometimes it is needednonono2.gif

 

post #9 of 21

Another Cascade Mountain Skier here!  Looks like they've completed a lot of work over the summer.  I can't wait to start skiing.

post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 

Yea, I have the bug already as well.  Hoping for lots of snow in the Portage area.

post #11 of 21

Here you go.


Here is how NOT to do it.

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post


He didn't say his skis were new.  I once asked Pat at PM Gear why I would feel like one ski was taking off (out and away) on me.  He replied although a new ski, perhaps the new tune wasn't so good, so to have them tuned.  Others have also mentioned Dynastars coming in with less than optimal base tunes right out of the plastic. I am very reluctant to machine tune a new pair of skis, but others have suggested sometimes it is needednonono2.gif

 

 

Title of thread is "First tune on new skis"

post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by handhdad View Post

 

Title of thread is "First tune on new skis"


And it's also a year old thread, hopefully he's tuned the skis by now.

post #14 of 21

if you're not a racer and money is something that has value to you, 

 

Go ski your skis for a bit on the factory tune, then decide where you want to get a tune if you're not skiing well and it's a good time to blame the equipment..

 

It also depends how much they are charging for the tune compared to your other options.

 

For the video playlist above on "how not to tune", I watched, and there's a bit of tune snobbery there.

On one hand the first videos in the playlist show a bunch of operator noobs just trashing their skis by hand.   But on the other hand, the playlist goes on to trash on  automated machines where the purpose is taking the skis out of an operator's hand.  You can't have it both ways,  where you say don't tune by hand like these guys, but then don't tune by machine.

 

If you don't want to be paying $75 each time to get a tune, the machine tune maybe a good option at  $25-$45 (cost of snowell tune at northstar) which is comparable to a tune at most shops.  Especially if you seen the typical tune monkeys who work in the back, and are getting paid minimum wage and potentially just getting back from a "medicinal" break. 

 

So yea, maybe you should not expect the machine to get you a 100% perfectionist tune as if you've paid $75 to a wise veteran ski technician or even a hand tune; but it "should" be a consistent job and you minimize the chance that you end up with a complete disaster.

post #15 of 21

Here is the way I see it.

Then here is a good way to ruin a sports car, and put crappy tires on it.

post #16 of 21

Dynastar bad factory tune? Check...worst burr I've ever seen and tried to ski on.

 

Bottom line is get to know who's tuning your skis.  I've known the guy that does mine for 52 years.

 

Technology is only as good as the operator...so what's the diff?

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson View Post

Dynastar bad factory tune? Check...worst burr I've ever seen and tried to ski on.

 

Bottom line is get to know who's tuning your skis.  I've known the guy that does mine for 52 years.

 

Technology is only as good as the operator...so what's the diff?

It's from the factory.  How you gonna' control that.  You can't tell Luigi in wherever to do a certain thing to your stuff.  Dynastar is killer as any.  Most of us have to pick what is for sale where we buy.  If I could get a pair with untouched edges, I would do that.  Not everyone can buy race stock etc.

Be good!

post #18 of 21

A ski fresh from the factory should not have a burr so bad that the ski is basically un-skiable.  That's what happened to me.  And I' not the only one and Dynastar seems to be a repeat offender.

 

The question was whether or not to have a tune done on new skis.  The answer is yes. See above. 

 

You do not trust or distrust a machine, rather the operator...just like having a hand-tune done.

post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson View Post

A ski fresh from the factory should not have a burr so bad that the ski is basically un-skiable.  That's what happened to me.  And I' not the only one and Dynastar seems to be a repeat offender.

 

The question was whether or not to have a tune done on new skis.  The answer is yes. See above. 

 

You do not trust or distrust a machine, rather the operator...just like having a hand-tune done.

Do I like to party....The answer is YES!  Be good man!

post #20 of 21

Old thread.... but I know a shop with this machine. Good machine but you also need a good tech. 

post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScourgeSkier View Post

Old thread.... but I know a shop with this machine. Good machine but you also need a good tech. 

Threads never die.  They are all still here.

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