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Help! How to put weight on BOTH skis??? - Page 2

post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpskier View Post

Any advice?   I learned to ski with all my weight on the outside ski, and now I can't stop it!

 

I'm going back to Utah again this year, and I know that this is killing me there.  It seems easy--just put some weight on the inside foot.  But it's soooooooo hard to do this for me.  Like impossible.  

 

Anyone ever break the "all your weight on the outside ski" habbit?  It's fine on the groomers, but . . .

 

I've played with skiing on 1 ski for many turns--it still isn't helping.  Not that I'm that good at it.  Blah.

 

THANKS FOR ANY THOUGHTS!

Brett  redface.gif



Simple: narrow your stance and try to make same movements with both legs.

 

post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

We can move onto identifying the important differences between vertical and horizontal bilateral moves and how it relates to outside foot and two footed stances.

 

 

  • outside leg only stances tend to use bilateral movements separated into left and right hemispheres. Left arm and leg moving forward simultaneously / right arm and leg moving forward simultaneously. (IE: counter develops as a function of moving the inside half forward/ pulling the outside half back. Whole body rotary moves are another example where we stay square to the skis but still use left / right half movements.
  • Two footed skiing stances tend to use bilateral movements separated into the upper and lower hemispheres. Legs move together simultaneously, upper body moving together simultaneously. (IE: counter develops as a function of turning the legs beneath the torso)

 

 


Jasp, I am trying to picture in my head what the difference between these two are. If we use the same frame of reference in both cases, aren't the legs moving in unity in both cases?

 

post #33 of 37

Perspectives are somewhat relevent here but the point I was making is the outside arm and leg moving forward or back, or the inside arm and leg moving forward or back, seperates the body into left and right halfs moving as a unit. This doesn't imply that externally rotating the inside leg while moving the inside half forward changes the fact that the leg is moving forward with the rest of the inside half. So the anchor is the outside leg. Javelin turns are a good example of this type of motion.

Contrast that with turning both legs to the left (or right) simultaneously but not turning the torso at all. Now the active motion is limited to the lower half of the body. Of course at some point the skis will turn the entire body as they scribe a turn. Leg steering is the common name for this type of movement and it's the torso that's the anchor. The bar stool drill is a good example of this type of motion.

 

Both produce a countered stance but the latter doesn't introduce as much angular momentum since the mass we are moving is smaller. Hope that helps Jamt.

 

post #34 of 37

OK, I see what you mean. Thanks for the clarification

post #35 of 37

 

Quote:

Any advice?   I learned to ski with all my weight on the outside ski, and now I can't stop it!

Make some turns holding your downhill ski in the air so that you are only 100% on your uphill ski.  Once you can make a turn with all your weight on your uphill AND all you weight on your downhill, you should be able to mix it up. 

 

Also... I don't think this is that much of a problem anyway.  Since the invention of shaped skis people have been talking about having your weight evenly distributed... I think it's mostly BS.  In deep powder you can even it out a little, but other than that, I would suggest keeping most of your weight on your downhill ski, unless you want to ski with a lack of power and precision. 

post #36 of 37

I'm a big fan of evening out the weight some in softer 3D conditions.  I don't know if its 50/50 or not, but closer to 50/50 then to outside dominate.  I can't see any advantage gained at all to being primarily on the outside ski in 3D snow, and many many advantages to evening it out.  My advice is to keep working on that.  

post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blake Saunders View Post

 

Make some turns holding your downhill ski in the air so that you are only 100% on your uphill ski.  Once you can make a turn with all your weight on your uphill AND all you weight on your downhill, you should be able to mix it up. 

 

Also... I don't think this is that much of a problem anyway.  Since the invention of shaped skis people have been talking about having your weight evenly distributed... I think it's mostly BS.  In deep powder you can even it out a little, but other than that, I would suggest keeping most of your weight on your downhill ski, unless you want to ski with a lack of power and precision. 



you mean outside ski. If we weighted only our DH ski we would all be skiing pretty damn efficiently.

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