New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

"Ken Burns" instruction

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hesitated to post this....seems a bit like going to a Ferrari convention and asking for advise on what tires to put on your Yugo.

 

My daughter had a birthday recently, and at her school the kids are asked to bring some kind of "what I did this year" stuff when it is their birthday, usually pictures on a poster board. Mine wanted to do a slide show so I blew the digital dust off Premier elements and we made a project of it - she picked out the pictures (about 1/3 are of her skiing).  Figured out how to do the Kens Burns type effect to give it a little motion and set it to music.  I think it turned out fair.  Sent copies on thumb drives to the grandparents and they loved it, (grandparents usually aren't too critical when their grandchildren are involved) and now I will be expected to repeat the process next year.  I would like to improve on the results for next years efforts.

 

I'm not asking "which button do I push to achieve xxxx effect", rather I'm looking for more "artistic design" ideas or references regarding animating still shots.  General things such as:

 

-How long should each photo be displayed?  Should they all be displayed approx the same?

-Should zoom in pics be alternated with zoom out?  Pan left balanced with right?  Is there a best ratio for starting and ending size?

-Stick with a few transitions or vary them as much as possible?

-Pan/zoom speed?  Should the pic come to a standstill for a few beats before the next transition or keep moving?

 

I know there won't be any cookie cutter answers to any of these questions but hoping I might find some ideas or pointers to references which might help this complete non-artist improve composition.

post #2 of 6

Is there a link to her project?  Post that and you will get a lot more replies from some very talented folks (unlike me).

 

Happy birthday to your daughter.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

Is there a link to her project?  Post that and you will get a lot more replies from some very talented folks (unlike me).

 

Happy birthday to your daughter.

I was trying to keep the unsuspecting from being ambushed by sappy amateur home movies that are only marginally skiing related. 

 

Here it is....note that the music is not what was on the original, had to replace it with something from youtube due to copyright and couldn't find much on a quick search of audioswap last night.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srje8zGChm8
 



Edited by Alveolus - 10/6/11 at 10:31am
post #4 of 6

You did a nice job with it.  Although I have a good program from Roxio I frequently find myself just going back to Windows Movie Maker.  Their effects are limited but I added a package from Pixelan.

 

You have to get through a lot of other shots before you see the snow sports section but I used Pixelan's effects in this video.

 

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by patmoore View Post

You did a nice job with it.  Although I have a good program from Roxio I frequently find myself just going back to Windows Movie Maker.  Their effects are limited but I added a package from Pixelan.

 I like it, I think yours appears....cleaner, classier (and not just the subject matter).  I really don't have the vocabulary.  The pans/zooms seem to be lower speed, the overall amount of pan/zoom is less, and there is not any preset transition between pics.  I think I may have been guilty of "hey there are all these neat transition effects! Must use them all!"

post #6 of 6

I do tv and video for a living.  Sorry, but nothing screams kid and amateur like a bunch of different transitions.  A major post production facility in NYC used to have a sign on the door, "Cuts Work!"  It was there because all newbie producers go for those wacky wipes.  When you see a tv show with effected footage and transitions it is usually because they have crappy footage and are trying to make something from nothing.  Dissolves are fine but they can sap the energy from a video so I suggest using them sparingly.  Surprisingly, it can be hard, at first to get the timing right so that cuts are not jarring. It's all in the pacing...pacing or timing is everything.

 

Length of time a shot should be up depends on several things: how good is the shot?  How easy or hard is the shot to "read"? What is the overall pacing of the piece?  Are you cutting to a beat? 

 

Cutting to a beat or music phrase generally works the best.  I get bored of the "Ken Burns" style of slowly moving pics and panning and zooming.... perhaps try cutting within a shot.

 

Music should be something appropriate to the age of the subject or the subject matter.

 

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: