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Rocker2 vs Shiro vs AKJJ

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Decisions Decisions Decisions, looking for some new skis this year & need some help in deciding. I have been skiing on the Super 7 for the past season & prior to that on a JJ. The JJ at that time felt too short in the 185cm length, The 195 cm Super 7 is a great ski but is a handful in the tighter stuff. This year seems to offer a lot of choices for this type of ski. I ski in Whistler, & get into the cascades a few times a year. The reviews on these skis are far & few, anyone have any first hand experience on either of these or some advice? Thanks in advance

post #2 of 13

It seems to me that since you like your Super 7 except for in the tight spots, the Super 7 in 188 would be a logical answer.

 

IAC....The Rocker2 is softish and playful feeling while the Shiro is a bit more burly and closer to the Super 7.

 

SJ

post #3 of 13

Word is the Rocker 2 is an amazing powder ski but useless on groomers.  Not that it was designed for use on groomers.

post #4 of 13

Is this a one ski quiver, or part of a multi-ski quiver?  I'm looking for something similar for the wider end of a two ski quiver, and in addition to those you mentioned, I keep looking at the 191 ON3P Caylor; 186 ON3P Billy Goat, 184 Moment Bibby Pro, or 189 K2 Obsethed as skis that can handle heavier snow.

 

See: 

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/on3p-caylor-191cm

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/2010-2011-2011-2012-k2-obsethed-189cm

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/update-moment-bibby-pro-184cm

 

FWIW, the 4FRNT CRJ is shaped a bit like the JJ, but with a longer TR.  I've owned it in a few sizes, and it's super fun ski, but not fabulous in chop.  Last year's (or newer) 188 (with a stiffer tail) might be OK on the more playful end of things, depending on your size/weight.

see:

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/2011-2012-4frnt-crj-180cm

 

 

 

post #5 of 13

Three really different designs. Having skied Whistler, would look for something that can handle transitions with scratch or stiff crud, not just bottomless fluff. Skied the straight S7 there (I'm 165 lbs, don't need the Super, let alone 195 cm), liked it mostly except at speed on the glaciers. Very nice in trees and forming bumps. From what I've heard, the Shiro would be the best all around of your three choices, cannot see the Rocker2 as a sole ski anywhere lift served. But like Dino, I'd take a look at ON3P. BG or Caylor would fit various styles, be pretty versatile. Personally have had nice experiences with Prior down at Function Junction, suspect the Husume would be a great all conditions every day ski, the Overlord better than the S7 for everything soft except silly tight trees. And if you have some $$, the Kastle BMX108 seems made for Whistler. I skied the BMX98 there, it handled most conditions superbly, except for stiff whipped cream at speed and sheer ice. The 108 would have taken care of former, and who skis ice if they can wait a day or three? 

post #6 of 13

I am curious why no one is suggesting the DPS 112RP in this context. My cumulative impression from all the reviews I have read is: a much better S7. As a ski that is very much on my radar as an everything but bottomless or packed out conditions ski, the replies here are making me question my conclusion. Will not be able to demo so any additional input would be appreciated.

post #7 of 13

^^^^ I didn't suggest it because (my 184 Pures are still in the aether) from what I've read if they have a weakness, it's getting too springy/reactive in difficult transitions, eg, breakable crust, stiff mank with ice underneath etc. Depending on the model, these are light or crazy light skis, remember. And Whistler has so much vert, but a relatively low top, that it has different climate zones (seriously), can get a very dense snow (or rain), often the snow is total slop in the middle, frozen higher up, heavy chop in the glaciers. I'd want something with more damping for a day in day out. Prior, for instance, being just down the road, seems to get this. Suspect ON3P does too cuz it's located in the NW. I envision my incoming 112's as more truly soft snow oriented sidebounds than big mountain chargers. (And you don't get many bigger mountains.) But the hybrid appears somewhat damper than the pure, and anyway my personalized .02, so...

post #8 of 13

^^^^^ Thanks for valuable input. I guess it just means I need even more skis than I thought!cool.gif

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by allan o'neil View Post

I am curious why no one is suggesting the DPS 112RP in this context. My cumulative impression from all the reviews I have read is: a much better S7. As a ski that is very much on my radar as an everything but bottomless or packed out conditions ski, the replies here are making me question my conclusion. Will not be able to demo so any additional input would be appreciated.



I didn't suggest it b/c the OP asked about specific models all of which are appropriate to his needs and I tend answer the question that was axed. IAC, I owned an S7 (188) for two years and IMO, if there is a weakness in the S7 it is that the ski can get punted around somewhat when the snow gets heavier and/or tracked out, skied out, chopped up etc. Also, the narrow soft tail can cause the ski to sort of "wheelie" out from under you in certain circumstances. Eventually, I found the S7 to be mostly a "morning" ski meaning I usually headed back to the car to get something else, at some point or another.

 

The DPS 112RP answers those weaknesses very well but the Super 7 does so as well and the OP already had experience with the Super (albeit possibly the wrong size). In most cases, when a questioner has a good direction, I won't suggest he go off in another one. It's pretty hard to make a mistake with most of these skis.

 

As far as the 112RP not being adequate for bottomless......heck, I guess you could find something better but if you can't ski the smoke on one of those........th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

As to packed out conditions, I don't even consider that when looking at this category. I guess, if you are considering a 112mm double rise double taper ski as a daily driver then it might be a concern and within that niche, the 112 RP is as good as any and better than most.

 

SJ

post #10 of 13

^^^^^ Hate reposting. As I said I was just curious. When you are in a position where you pretty well have to buy without a demo, you tend to be a bit paranoid of making the right decisions. In any case, they will not be a daily driver and they may never get skied in bottomless pow and heavy wet snow is not on the menu either. So I think we are all good!

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

Thanks for the in put, I should have clarified that this would not be a one ski quiver & am also looking for a ski in the 100-107 range. Maybe a Gotama, or something in that range? Having said that I’m not the kind of guy who will swap skis mid day, so I do want a ski that will get me thru the day once the POW is skied out. Sounds like the Shiro or the 188 Super 7 might fit the bill?

post #12 of 13

FYI - PhilPug reviewed the Shiro here: http://www.epicski.com/t/102709/review-2012-volkl-shiro

 

Based on his take and what everyone else has said about it (including the various ski magazines) it's definitely a beefy ski meant for hard charging and busting up crud when the powder is skied out and sounds like it definitely out-performs the Rocker 2 on groomers / hard snow.

post #13 of 13

I would not hesitate to use a Rocker 2 for this. In fact I'd gladly use it as a OSQ in Whistler. 

 

As the fatter part of a 2 ski Whistler quiver, you might also consider K2 Pon2oons (which ski crud & heavy snow well), ON3P Pillow Fight or C&D, or any of the fatter Praxis models.  I'd personally probably do a Praxis BPS or Protest (especially at current sale prices w/ "EPIC" coupon for 10% additional off). But I'm a Praxis fan. The bottom line is that all of these are great skis in this context. Presumably you are aware of what Prior has to offer.

 

I have not skied the Shiro - but have skied the Kuro and rockered Gotama extensively. Just looking at it and flexing it, the trade offs made on the Shiro were not the ones I'd hoped for. Your opinion could well differ from mine and it should be easy to demo though.

 

Also, the CRJ was mentioned above. I spent a half day on them and found them a challenge in hard or cutup snow. They wanted precision exactly where I was not inclined to try to deliver it (and even in the best of circumstances, I am not Mr. Precision). Swapping for the EHP (of which I have seen many at Whistler) was like a breath of fresh air IMO. The YLE appeared to handle well too, but I did not ski it.

 

 

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