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Leg Length Discrepancy correction

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hey everyone. Always loved this forum. After years of Greg Hoffman doing my boots at Vail, I am going to get my new, duplicate pair of Tecnica The Agent 120's set up locally this year. the current pair as 175 days on them. They were canted, etc. by Greg when I bought them including footbeds.

I have a short left leg. Standing in front of a mirror I have to stand on 3/4" of something to have my hips and shoulders level. I also have some scoliosis which curves me more to that left side. Thus left turns are better. Left ski one-footed skiing is better.

I have put 12mm heel lifts in my sneakers and shoes and it almost brings my hips and shoulders even, but not quite. No issues with my back, had this for months now.

Greg did 1/4" heel lift and 3mm riser plates on the left boot. I'd like to correct even more this year as something still is holding me back and I believe I big part of it is this body alignment issue.

What do you think of breaking the "we only adjust for 1/2 of the LLD with risers" rule and really going for leveling my hips and shoulders out?

What do you think of doing most of this on the bottom of the boot, and of course routing back to DIN spec?
post #2 of 12

Hey Mango!

 

While the general rule of thumb is make up 1/2 the difference, if you feel no strain trying a bit more would probably not be a problem.

 

I would make up as much as possible under the boot sole with a 7mm lifter plate then look at possibly lifting a binding 3mm or possibly slipping a 3mm bontex insole shim under your boot liner if there is room.  I am not a fan of using heel lifts to make up the difference for skiing because you are changing your ramp angle from one side to the other side which can cause some fore/aft balance issues.  This does not present a problem in a street shoe and is the remedy many podiatrist use.  Note: lifting more than 7mm could be risky when routering the lugs as they could become too weak and sacrifice durability.

 

best wishes,

bud

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hey Bud! Thanks for the reply. I hadn't thought of the maximum lift. Problem with binding lifts is one of my pairs of skis have integrated bindings.

How about grinding the right boot down a few millimeters?
post #4 of 12

remember the boot has to still fit in the binding, so unless you can add a 3mm stainless steel skeg to the top of the lugs (as used on some world cup boots) then you can't do that, i did one yesterday and as it was a head raptor we were able to use a lower base board (from the RD range) and fill the volume difference with a foam liner

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
CEM, I'm confused. When greg did the 3mm plate on the bottom of the boot he said all he had to do was to router the boots back to DIN spec.

I appreciate your post, but don't understand the skeg and RD range terms.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

CEM, I'm confused. When greg did the 3mm plate on the bottom of the boot he said all he had to do was to router the boots back to DIN spec.
I appreciate your post, but don't understand the skeg and RD range terms.


sorry to cause confusion, you suggested taking material off the boot (grinding down the right boot a few mm), if you grind the boot down you need to add a plate to the base of it then rout it back to fit in the binding, thus eliminating the effect of grinding it down

 

in the RD (Race department) of many companies they have 3mm stainless steel shims which they screw to the top of the heel and toe lugs (they use these to stop damage to the boot from the high spring tensions on the bindings, but they can effect release) so effectively you could grind down the sole of the boot by 3mm then instead of adding a plate to the bottom of the boot (eliminating the grinding) you could add the 3mm to the top of the toe and heel lugs 

 

this would make the boot fit in the binding but be 3mm lower than the other boot

 

hope that makes more sense 

post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Aha, now I understand! I didn't realize you were talking about the possibility of the right boot grinding, thought you were talking about the left book raising. Makes sense. Thanks for the explanation!

Do you agree with Bud about the 7mm maximum for a lifter plate under the boot?

I'd really like to go as much as 12mm or more total between all things done.
post #8 of 12

100% agree with Bud

 

7mm is your max for a couple of reasons

 

1 you need something left of the boot so you don't rip the sole off it when you turn,

2 no one makes a bigger lift than  7mm any more, i have a couple of salomon 10mm ones but they are very old school and i wouldn't suggest using them

post #9 of 12

Agree with CEM and Bud about boots but wonder about lifting skis.  Integrated system alone does not make it impossible.  What binding are you using?

 

Lou

post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hey Lou,

Problem is 2-3 different pairs of skis, and then the need to remove the plates when I sell the skis.

The Fischer Progressor 8+ are the ones with an integrated binding. I'll definitely consider raising the bindings though when I see Nick in November.
post #11 of 12

Understand, more than a one ski quiver always complicates things. but don't forget that with each different binding comes different ramp angles and heights.  IMO a goal should be to standardize each binding so that as much as possible they are identical then do the boot work.

 

 

Lou

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
OK, so I think I'll stick mostly to one pair of skis this year. That said - can I lift the bindings on my Fischer Railflxex FX-12 bindings?

If so - how? Something I could do myself possibly? Any decent shop capable of doing this?
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