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Boots throwing me forward

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Boots.JPG

 

Hello there. I bought these boots for a trip to Whistler earlier this year. I finally bit the bullet after years of renting boots which caused me nothing but pain and misery. Unfortunately, these fellas compounded my problems and I ended up going to my local CAN ski store to have the toes punched. Black toe was a real problem but that's a whole other story. My question now relates to the fact that the boots seem to throw me much farther forward than I have experienced with other boots. I got them fitted before I left and they have custom footbeds. I spent most of the trip in a permanently "engaged" stance and my quads were jelly after little time on the mountain. My instructor took out a wedge of plastic in the back, which made things a little better, but apparently, they're incapable of any further adjustment. I need to feel likeI'm standing a bit taller and wonder if there's any other remedy besides buying a new set of boots. Please forgive a newbie if the answer is staring me in the face. Thanks.

post #2 of 11

welcome to the mad house..... we need a bit more detail,  your stats, height, weight, level of skier etc etc also, while we are on the stats thing, measure around your calf at the top of the boot and let us know what the size of the calf muscle is at that point

 

there are loads of things which could be causing the problem, and lots of things that can be done to help resolve things like this...also, when you load a picture onto the forum, best to make it slightly smaller and low res as it slows the whole thread down in loading

post #3 of 11

As CEM stated a bit more info will be helpful but I will tell you in my experience this particular boot does put the skier in a more flexed forward position than most others and consequently will cause a counter balancing affect putting your hips back behind your feet.  This could be compounded by larger calves as CEM elluded to as well as the model binding you are using on your skis which may create a steeper angle too.  The solution could be quite simple and involve plating the toes of your boots to change the angles to a more upright position, but to do it right your boot fitter needs to begin with checking ankle dorsiflexion then building your angles up and out from there to find the optimum solution.

 

Where do you live and perhaps we can suggest a boot fitter to help you?

 

good luck.

bud

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

Bud and CEM, thanks very much for your replies. Thanks for the tip CEM re the picture size. I see what you mean.

 

I'm 44 years of age, six feet in height and I weigh 88 kilos (190 pounds roughly). Intermediate skier who skis at most once a year (living in Queensland, Australia can do that to you). I began skiing late (age 35) and haven't stopped since. Athletic but with bad knees. I like to ski the blue groomers and occasional black. I have very tight hammies and I hadn't done much stretching before the last trip. I suspect that would contribute to the problem.

 

The boots are in storage at the moment but doing the best I can, I estimate calf size about 37 cms around the top of my boots. I don't have massive calves and I wear orthotics to counter reasonably flat feet. I don't wear the orthotics in my ski boots as the fitter told me that would be a bad idea. He said the footbeds would solve my problems in that regard.

 

The boots felt great in the shop and around the back yard but after two hours on snow, I began to suspect it might be a long trip. Incredible fatigue towards the end of the third day...first time I actually haven't enjoyed the snow.

 

The boots were professionally fitted in Brisbane and the guys there seemed to know their stuff. The footbeds etc were all well prepared and they took their time.

 

I look forward to hearing from you guys. Thanks so much for replying.

post #5 of 11

do you want the boots more upright, or the pain in your quads gone?   might not be the same thing....

 

to make teh boots more upright, lowering the rear cuff by a few mm might help, or even try a thin heel lift (puts less calf in the boot, so you can stand a bit more upright)   The lowering permenant, and the heel lift is not.  Try that first.

 

for why the quads, might be the F lean of the boots, might be you sitting too far back and this new, high performance boot forcing you into the correct stance.   If the boot forces your knee forward, your hips might go back to counter this, so your shins are on the front of the boot, but your hips are still back of center?   like you are in a squat all the time.

 

 

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the post mntlion.

 

I want a more upright stance and the pain in my quads gone. I suspect that one might follow the other.

 

I've now had the chance to read some other posts on a variety of subjects (including forward lean threads), and my suspicion is that I've purchased a race/stiffer boot which is above my station. When I bought it, I told the bloke at the shop that I was a casual blue groomer/occasional black sort of guy and he assured me these would work for me. Now I suspect I've parted with my hard earned for no real reward.

 

The feeling I get when I strap these suckers on is that I'm permanently crouching and consequently, my quads are 100% engaged, even when I'm standing on the flat waiting for the lift. While stationary, I find myself continually sticking my poles way out in the snow and pushing on them just to get a bit of relief. The back feels tight too.

 

Think I might have to see someone at a bigger store before the next trip.

post #7 of 11

What size feet? and what brand and model binding?  Could be a combo of excessive forward lean caused by large calves and delta angle created by boot sole length and binding stand height differential.  Shimming under your binding toe piece or gas pedaling your boots will bring the boot cuff more upright and possibly be your solution????

post #8 of 11

 

 

     Your boots should have 70.5mm of forward lean ( with the heel against a wall measure to the back of the liner at the top of the shell).  With your size calves you probably only need about 50mm.

 

      To see the effect of less forward lean, try stacking magazines under your boot toes till your quads just unload.  The height of the magazines will equal the amount of  forward lean you will need taken out of your boots.

 

mike

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the comments Mike. Much appreciated.

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post

What size feet? and what brand and model binding?  Could be a combo of excessive forward lean caused by large calves and delta angle created by boot sole length and binding stand height differential.  Shimming under your binding toe piece or gas pedaling your boots will bring the boot cuff more upright and possibly be your solution????

 

Hi Bud. I have small feet for a bloke...about a size 7 Australian (I think that would be a size 8 US). I rent the skis and bindings....so that obviously could be a contributing factor. My calves aren't massive, but they aren't well-defined. I think years of flat feet have cured that. I continually fluctuate between having my orthotics in my boots and then taking them out and relying on the foot beds. That doesn't seem to change anything.

 

I remember years ago on a trip to Whistler renting some boots that gave me the same problem. I remember complaining to my instructor (Hi Lisa Richardson if you're out there) about it and she sent me back into the boot shop to change. I ended up with boots in which I could stand up straight and the results were instantaneous. I felt immediately more comfortable and confident on my skis. I'm just now coming to the sad realisation that I've purchased the boots that I sent back to the rental shop.
 

 

post #11 of 11

Short boot sole length which creates a steeper angle between your binding heel and toe, and steep forward lean can add up to your problems!?

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