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First Twin Tip recommendation

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone, I've been lurking on this site and doing research on what skis I want to get for some time now, and am somwhat overwhelmed and confused by all the terminology and info available.  This will be my 4th season skiing, and I only get to ski about 10 times max each year, but for my area (wisconsin) I am pretty good.  I have been skiing on some crappy used k2 skiis and some used boots for awhile, and they both suck so It's time to get new ones.  I spend a lot of time in the park on the smaller hills, so I want a twin tip that can handle jumps but also be able to do bumps, powder (not as much of a priority,but I will be going to colorado this year) and not suck on the groomers for carving.  Here are the two things that are making it hard for me to figure out what ski I want, I am short and light, 5' 6" and 135ish lbs.  I really love hitting jumps but am not a big fan of jibbing, and can only do a few tricks right now, so I don't want super-expert twin tip skis. 

 

Also, I would like the skis to be fairly low priced, I am fine with previous year's models as long as they don't suck.

 

Thanks in advance! 

post #2 of 4

First, lose the used boots. Boots, not skis, are the most important part of your gear. It won't matter how good of a ski you have if you're stuck with sloppy, poorly fitted boots. Get some new boots and add a decent footbed like Superfeet to fine-tune the fit. Not cheap, but it will pay you back in added performance and comfort. For skis, every year there seem to be more and more good skis available on the market. Maybe that's the cause of your confusion, too many choices! Since you're fairly new to park riding, you don't want a dedicated park ski just yet. An easy-going twin-tip that will do double duty for both park and all-mountain riding is probably your best choice. I would look at the Dynastar Distorter or Atomic Panic. I have the Panic and really enjoy it for all-mountain skiing. Demoing skis before buying is of course the best approach, but it's not convenient for a lot of skiers. If you want to stay with K2, REI's online store is clearing out last season's model of the Silencer for about $174.00. Every ski season, REI seems to pick one or two skis to clear out at super low prices. Last year it was the Panic, this time around it's the Silencer. Check out evogear as well. Again, they are clearing out some of the older models to make way for the new, so you can get into some good entry level skis for not too much money.  

post #3 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by gimmesnow View Post

First, lose the used boots. Boots, not skis, are the most important part of your gear. It won't matter how good of a ski you have if you're stuck with sloppy, poorly fitted boots. Get some new boots and add a decent footbed like Superfeet to fine-tune the fit. Not cheap, but it will pay you back in added performance and comfort. For skis, every year there seem to be more and more good skis available on the market. Maybe that's the cause of your confusion, too many choices! Since you're fairly new to park riding, you don't want a dedicated park ski just yet. An easy-going twin-tip that will do double duty for both park and all-mountain riding is probably your best choice. I would look at the Dynastar Distorter or Atomic Panic. I have the Panic and really enjoy it for all-mountain skiing. Demoing skis before buying is of course the best approach, but it's not convenient for a lot of skiers. If you want to stay with K2, REI's online store is clearing out last season's model of the Silencer for about $174.00. Every ski season, REI seems to pick one or two skis to clear out at super low prices. Last year it was the Panic, this time around it's the Silencer. Check out evogear as well. Again, they are clearing out some of the older models to make way for the new, so you can get into some good entry level skis for not too much money.  


Amen to that, evo has a great sale going on right now and I picked up last season's ugly ass seth morrison pro models for half retail.  A boot makes a world of difference especially if you're gonna be going more this season.

 

post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 

Thanks to both of you, and to elaborate on my original question... What length of ski would you recomend in certain models for my weight and height (135 lb 5'6") and is there a certain type of bindings I should get?

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