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New Telemark skis and Confusion!

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

I ordered a new pair of Rosignol Telemark 170cm skis online. They are really nice and I just received them in the mail.

Here is the problem. I ordered them not knowing that telemark skiing was different then alpine skiing. I have always just used the regular downhill skiing when I've rented before. My friend told me what telemark skiing was, because I have seen people doing it before while on the mountain. However, They don't have bindings or holes for bindings or anything like that. I love to ski, but I've never owned skis, and don't really know the process of how maintenance or getting them ready works.

My question is can I buy regular alpine bindings for telemark skis? I would much prefer not to have to learn how to telemark ski. So I'm wondering if regular alpine bindings can be fitted onto them since they are only the skis right now. Is there something different with telemark skis that doesn't work with alpine bindings and boots?

If they can be fitted with regular alpine bindings, how do I go about fitting the bindings on the skis or should I have a shop do it?

Any and all help would be amazing! Thanks!

post #2 of 26

Can you post a link to the skis you purchased?

post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
post #4 of 26

The OP sent me a PM to say that he can't reply yet, due to juniority, but the ski in question is the Rossignol Yama (121/72/100).  If I recall correctly, the shape of the ski was similar to the B1, but with weight reduction for touring use.

 

You can mount alpine bindings on these skis.  If I were you, though, and I were able to return these skis to the seller, I probably wouldn't.  And if you can't return them, you might try to sell them, e.g., at telemarktips.com.

 

These are really intended for use by skiers who are earning their own turns, rather than taking lifts.  That means they are more likely to deflect, and may be less durable, than skis intended for resort use.  You probably paid about $250 for them on closeout, and at that price (plus about $125-150 for bindings and mounting), there are better options for you.  

 

You'll get a lot of recommendations for those options with a little more information about yourself -- your age, height, weight, where you ski, what types of terrain you prefer, etc.

post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 

So if you were me, you would sell them?

 

I'm 22, 5'10", weigh 150, I generally ski in the Black Hills at Terry Peak...though I love Colorado but don't get out there much. I prefer skiing of any kind haha, but generally run into either tightly packed groomed runs, or tightly packed groomed runs with some powder on them.

They are brand spanking new and still in plastic.

post #6 of 26

Sell 'em, unless you plan to tour on them (if you plan to go touring you will also need some touring bindings/boots, e.g. dynafit or similar).

Buy something more appropriate to the skiing you plan to do.

post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 

Thanks, I will do that.

post #8 of 26

Mount them with Telemark bindings. Telemarking is better. You will have more fun. Chicks dig it. You can get really good at Terry Peak without getting really bored. Perfect for South Dakota where alpine gear is overkill. Congrats on a most fortuitous purchase. :)

post #9 of 26
Thread Starter 

I honestly don't know much about telemarking. It's more about lots of turns right? What does "earning your turns" mean?
The main problem, is just that I don't know how to do it.


Edited by jpmanson - 10/27/11 at 8:00am
post #10 of 26

"Earning turns" refers to hiking up hills instead o0f using a ski lift.

 

Alpine skiing is mostly about the turns too. You don't need to do "lots of turns" with Telemark gear unless you want to, but you will want to.

 

With Telemark gear you can make the same turns as alpine skiers plus you can make Telemark turns! You don't have to learn anything new, but you will want to.

 

Learning new skills is the best part of skiing, fixed heel or free!

post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 

So telerod, king of Telemarking..

 

...I'm not going to lie it sounds really fun :D

 

Couple questions though:
 

1. Is it similar expense? Or is the gear relatively similar cost, just depends what brand and stuff?

2. Can you do jumps/park/stunts with telemark skis?

3. If you crash hard do the skis still fall off with tele gear?

4. What are some good videos that show me what tele skiing looks like?

post #12 of 26

If you got them on Steep and Cheap, you can return them.  Just select the $6 or $7 return label option.  A small price to pay.

post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

Mount them with Telemark bindings. Telemarking is better. You will have more fun. Chicks dig it. You can get really good at Terry Peak without getting really bored. Perfect for South Dakota where alpine gear is overkill. Congrats on a most fortuitous purchase. :)



LOL!   ... from a 25-year (formerly) telemark skier, who married a 44-year-old telemark skier (very attractive, but hardly a chick!).

post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmanson View Post

So telerod, king of Telemarking..

 

...I'm not going to lie it sounds really fun :D

 

Couple questions though:
 

1. Is it similar expense? Or is the gear relatively similar cost, just depends what brand and stuff?

2. Can you do jumps/park/stunts with telemark skis?

3. If you crash hard do the skis still fall off with tele gear?

4. What are some good videos that show me what tele skiing looks like?


Telemark skiing is, MSRP, probably not much different in expense unless you go for backcountry only gear, like 3-pin bindings, lower-level boots, and lightweight skis.

You can do anything on the appropriate tele gear if you have the skills; everything is easier fixed heel.

You can buy releasable telemark bindings; not all are releasable; none of the releasable work as well as alpine bindings.

The best single video of telemark from the aesthetic point of view is Nils Larson's Beyond the Groomed; I'm sure there are lots of "extreme" telemark videos, but I don't care :-) ...

 

post #15 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDad View Post

If you got them on Steep and Cheap, you can return them.  Just select the $6 or $7 return label option.  A small price to pay.



I am pretty sure I could make at least a little money on them on ebay or craigs list since they are brand spanking new, and only paid 150 for them

post #16 of 26

Here's a video of French alpinists ripping it up near Chamonix. Two telemarkers, a snowboarder and alpine skiers.

 

http://vimeo.com/8550563

 

 

I've been telemarking since the late '70s, though in the last five years I've gone over to the dark side and mostly ski with a fixed heel. I agree with telerod about the beauty and appeal of the telemark turn. There is nothing quite like the feel of ripping huge telemark turns at high speed in good snow. Once you get the hang of the turn you'll be hooked. However telemarking requires more finesse in less than ideal conditions. Alpine skiing is technically easier than telemarking, I would say. At least it is for me.

post #17 of 26
Thread Starter 

So, since I won't be doing a whole lot of "earning my own" runs and such, will it be annoying for me to unbind my gear after constantly going up the lifts?

post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmanson View Post

So, since I won't be doing a whole lot of "earning my own" runs and such, will it be annoying for me to unbind my gear after constantly going up the lifts?

 

If you are asking about transitioning from lift served nordic downhill to hiking for turns, I don't know. Although I have been called the "kIng of Telemarking", I've rarely skied beyond the ski area  boundaries and I only skied uphill on one occasion, at an odd little  ski area in West Virginia that has hills but no lifts.

 

If you are thinking you need to fiddle with bindings before and after using the chairlift like a snowboarder, no you don't have to do that with Telemark bindings. You leave them unbound fort the lift and the descent.

 

Most good Telemark skiers were good alpine skiers first. I don't want to rob you of the fixed heel experience. It's easier, so you progress faster and that's gratifying. But you're young, you can probably pick up Telemark almost as quickly. If you can hook up with a Telemark instructor or other Telemark skiers at you area, they will give you tips. Get some videos and books, it's not rocket science.

 

I was lucky to have the opportunity to ski with the Telemark instructor at Ski Liberty which helped me advance my skills. When a new bigger hill, closer to his home opened, he moved on and I became the Telemark instructor at Ski Liberty for a year or two. :)

post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Carey View Post





LOL!   ... from a 25-year (formerly) telemark skier, who married a 44-year-old telemark skier (very attractive, but hardly a chick!).



Your wife is a hot tele chick. Deal with it. :D Why are you a (formerly) Telemark skier? :(

post #20 of 26

There is nothing wrong or problematic with mounting a 'tele" ski and using it for alpine. K2 completely did away with their "tele" ski line because when it comes down to it they are all just skis that excel in different conditions, regardless of if you are skiing them tele, AT or alpine.  I tele on "alpine" skis and my wife has been skiing a pair of Rossi tele skis alpine for years, and they perform wonderfully in all conditions.

 

The construction difference, if there is any, is that tele skis are usually made lighter and a little softer than their alpine counter parts.  Many companies put a different topsheet on one of their alpine ski models and sell them as tele skis, or eliminate an internal layer of metal to soften them a little and call them "tele skis."  Good skis are good skis, regardless of how they are classified or marketed.

 

If you are concerned about it and can easily return them, then do it. If not, have a shop mount some alpine bindings on them and don't think about it again.  They'll make a good conversation piece on chair rides, but other than that I would not sweat the difference.  Based on the info I saw, they are a well made ski that can handle hard or soft snow. They have the dualtech and VAS damping that comes on Rossi's top line skis.

 

The only concern I would have is that the skis may have factory mounting marks that are specific to tele bindings, so make sure the ski shop tech doing the mounting knows what they are doing and puts your alpine bindings in the correct location.


Edited by mudfoot - 9/27/11 at 5:18pm
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmanson View Post

So telerod, king of Telemarking..

 

...I'm not going to lie it sounds really fun :D

 

Couple questions though:
 

1. Is it similar expense? Or is the gear relatively similar cost, just depends what brand and stuff?

2. Can you do jumps/park/stunts with telemark skis?

3. If you crash hard do the skis still fall off with tele gear?

4. What are some good videos that show me what tele skiing looks like?



1. Yes

2. No I can't, but some people can.

3. Yes, I use Voile releasable bindings.

4.I learned a lot from Dickie Hall's videos. That was a long time ago. There may be more up to date instructional videos available. PSIA has some good instructional videos.

post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

There is nothing wrong or problematic with mounting a 'tele" ski and using it for alpine. K2 completely did away with their "tele" ski line because when it comes down to it they are all just skis that excel in different conditions, regardless of if you are skiing them tele, AT or alpine.  I tele on "alpine" skis and my wife has been skiing a pair of Rossi tele skis alpine for years, and they perform wonderfully in all conditions.

 

The construction difference, if there is any, is that tele skis are usually made lighter and a little softer than their alpine counter parts.  Many companies put a different topsheet on one of their alpine ski models and sell them as tele skis, or eliminate an internal layer of metal to soften them a little and call them "tele skis."  Good skis are good skis, regardless of how they are classified or marketed.

 

If you are concerned about it and can easily return them, then do it. If not, have a shop mount some alpine bindings on them and don't think about it again.  They'll make a good conversation piece on chair rides, but other than that I would not sweat the difference.  Based on the info I saw, they are a well made ski that can handle hard or soft snow. They have the dualtech and VAS damping that comes on Rossi's top line skis.

 

The only concern I would have is that the skis may have factory mounting marks that are specific to tele bindings, so make sure the ski shop tech doing the mounting knows what they are doing and puts your alpine bindings in the correct location.


A ski designed for Telemark might lack a metal plate under the heal binding area to prevent the binding from ripping out.

post #23 of 26

Telerod:

 

You are absolutely correct that some tele skis have a reduced mounting plate in order to save weight, and the Yama is just such a ski!  I contacted a dealer and found out that the Yamas have a narrow mounting plate in back that allows for mounting a tele heel piece or narrow AT binding like a Dynafit, but not many types of alpine bindings.  Thanks for educating me, and saving the OP from my faulty advice.  These days most non-alpine skis are marketed as tele/AT, but it appears some are still actually tele specific.

 

Mudfoot a/k/a Mr. Know It All, Not!

post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post





Your wife is a hot tele chick. Deal with it. :D Why are you a (formerly) Telemark skier? :(


At age 63, on the advice of many friends formerly telemark skiers, I tried AT and found: (1) the equipment was lighter in weight (even compared to my 3-pin/3-pin cables), (2) trail-breaking and climbing up were easier (even compared to the new "tour" telemark bindings) with less stress on the knees so I could go further and higher, (3) skiing down was much less aerobic/anaerobic and, thus, I didn't have to stop every 500 vertical feet, only every 1500-2000 vft, and (4) the safety of the release system for an old man vs. voile pressure releases or 7tm bindings.  I also found that I  skied steeper and faster with less effort and skied problematic snow easier,  That said, (1) telemark skiing on a steeper slope in deeper, lighter powder is an experience unto itself that cannot be beat; (2)  skiing very, very crappy snow, I still feel a little more in control with tele-skiing  , and (3) skiing rolling terrain with Volkl Snowwolfs or Karhu Guides, with brown Scarpa t-3s, and 3-pin bindings can't be beat by AT gear which might prove exasperating.  BTW, I now use Karhu Guides, Dynafit verticals (to be replaced with Speed Radicals), and Dynafit TLT5s even for my nordic ski patrol duties (30 days last winter 6-13 miles per day, usually breaking trail).

 

post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post




A ski designed for Telemark might lack a metal plate under the heal binding area to prevent the binding from ripping out.


I skied tele on Volkl Prestos (and ripped the Voile release plate out 3 times) and on Atomic R:EX with 7tms (no problems whatsoever); also skied a whole slew of BD and Tua AT skis with tele bindings.

 

post #26 of 26

My remark was concerning mounting a telemark ski with alpine bindings. Your reply seems to be about mounting telemark binding on some skis that may or may not be Telemark skis, you didn't specify. I don't think it matters anyway in this context.

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