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Insulated Resevoir or not?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

 

I recently purchased a backpack for the upcoming season (just as a small resort one, no sidecountry or backcountry) to keep some water and whatnot in, as I tend to get thirsty throughout the day (and to carry lunch, extra lens, etc...). I saw that the backpack is compatible with water resevoirs, so I was wondering if I needed an insulated water resevoir and tube for the hill, or just the tube? My initial impression is that a resevoir would not get cold enough to freeze (being in my backpack), but I am not too sure. If I go this route I will definitely get an insulated tube, but was wondering if an insulated resevoir is necessary (or recommended) as well? How likely is it to freeze? Thanks for any help!

 

EDIT: And if anyone knows of any stores in Canada (specifically Calgary) that sell these please list them!

post #2 of 10

Had a Northface pack with a bladder and an insulated hose with an electric heater,  The mouthpiece froze quickly, making all the insulation and heating worthless.  Insulated heated hose was OK and didn't freeze, but that didn't include the mouthpiece, which froze very quickly even on modestly cold days (e.g. -10 c).  Keeping the mouthpiece under my coat didn't work well.   In the end, it was a PITA!  Now I carry a small bottle in pack or under coat.

 

I use one of these for nordic - works great.  I don't know where is calgary you can buy one, but can purchase at Trail Sports at the Nordic Centre in Canmore.  The capacity for carrying alot of extra stuff is limited in these ( a few bars, keys, money).

 

a1.jpg

 

 


Edited by canadianskier - 9/26/11 at 8:27pm
post #3 of 10

Dakine heli pack has a zippered sleeve in the shoulder strap for your drinking tube. I insulate my tube, sometimes the mouthpiece freezes a little, but the tube, and the bladder in my pack don't freeze.

post #4 of 10


As noted above, you don't need an insulated bladder.   If you really want, you can insulate it yourself by wrapping some bubble wrap around it.   Your bigger problem is the drink valve, as noted above.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rek19 View Post

 

EDIT: And if anyone knows of any stores in Canada (specifically Calgary) that sell these please list them!

 

The first place to go for any of this stuff is the MEC store.    www.mec.ca

 

 

post #5 of 10
Couple of tips that have worked for me over the years

- blow the water out of the mouthpiece tube after drinking (you'll get the hang of not adding air to the bladder pretty quickly)

- tuck the hose + mouthpiece into your jacket (make sure the valve is closed).
post #6 of 10

WARNING: RANT AHEAD

 

This is a pet peeve. It should not be engineering or design rocket surgery to figure out  how to make a bladder/hose/valve that doesn't freeze. I have several Camelback insulated packs and even with the rubber valve cover, the bite-valve freezes on cold days. They both have an insulated sleeve on the shoulder strap that zips, but on one the zipper doesn't cover the bite valve and on the other the pocket for the bite valve is too small to effectively get the dang thing in there inside the lodge, nevermind outside with gloves on...... With all the technical insulating materials out there, they shoudl be able to make something that you can easily put the thing into without sticking it in your jacket and risking getting soaked. (happened to me once when bite valve came off. brrr!) 

 

Grrr.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies guys. From your posts I don't think I will be picking one up now. I guess I will just be stuck with having a couple bottles of water in the pack instead, seems like a lot less work and the cheaper way to go. Thanks for the info!

post #8 of 10

Just get one of these and use your extra layer in your pack to insulate:  http://www.rei.com/product/768123/platypus-plusbottle-1-liter-water-bottle-with-push/pull-cap?cm_mmc=cse_froogle-_-datafeed-_-product-_-768123&mr:trackingCode=CCAD15C2-B849-E011-AFD7-001517384908&mr:referralID=NA

 

Most of the time, I just fill it part way and put it in my pocket. 

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by elskier View Post

Couple of tips that have worked for me over the years

- blow the water out of the mouthpiece tube after drinking (you'll get the hang of not adding air to the bladder pretty quickly)

- tuck the hose + mouthpiece into your jacket (make sure the valve is closed).


 

This is your solution.  Keep the hose empty while skiing.  I also use a backpack hydration system and usually don't have to worry about burying the insulated hose in my jacket, as long as I keep the hose clear of water.  You do have to be careful when sitting back on the chair that you don't force water back up the hose.

 

Ski On!

 

Rick G

 

post #10 of 10

Get in the habit of taking a sip after getting off the lift and blowing out the hose.  Not only does it promote "good sipping technique" (ya, I invented that just now), it'll also solve any problem with water being forced into the hose by sitting against the lift on the way up. 

 

Sip at the top, blow.  Sip at the bottom, blow.  Repeat.

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