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Whats the best way to stay warm under a GS suit? - Page 2

post #31 of 48

Sibhusky ..... the old Japanese soldiers wore a .... similar .... er ... ball warmer into battle.  It was made from the skin of a badger and worn fur side in.

 

It was said that it gave courage.  Actually there is a martial arts technique that works quite well and has something to do with this.  Very effective! smile.gif

post #32 of 48


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post


 

If you are going to be training and racing at Ski Cooper, know that the new start building has radiant heat in the ceiling over the start as well as a heated room for racers to wait in.

 


The who and the what now???

 

post #33 of 48
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

SF,  I think you will find that it is less cold than you are expecting for your run.  I typically use an Underarmour top and bottom and for the really cold days, maybe another very thin pullover fleece or similar top underneath.  Even  when I raced in the frigid North East rather than the West i don't recall wearing any additional layers.   The issue is not so much for your race run, it is hanging around waiting to start.  If it is cold I will try to keep my pants or shorts on till about 7-8 minutes before my start time, then at 5 minutes, tighten the top buckles,  take my coat off and drape it over my shoulders while lining up, then drop it off at about 2 minutes to go. Because the Dobies are pretty cold I typically do the final  latch down on the bottom 2 buckles before getting into (or even in) the start gate and do a final cinch on the Booster strap.   That routine is the best I have found (for me) for keeping the muscles warm as much as possible prior to the start.  I am not a fan of multiple layers under my suit as, while it may just be psychological, I prefer to have as much flexibility as possible and don't like too much bulk under the suit.  Similarly wearing an oversize suit kinda defeats the object IMHO .

Of course this approach can still get screwed up if you get a start hold when you are in the line up or in the gate.....frown.gif.  You them need to try to keep moving a bit to keep the muscles warm

 

My normal MO is to also have another coat stashed at the finish.  That way you do not need to strip down earlier at the start to get someone to take it down and get cold while waiting to run.  Pretty much SOP for most of the people I race with.

 

Also I have found that the newer Spyder suits tend to be warmer than the older ones.  They also (and not before time!) have a slightly longer zipper which makes the other pre-start ritual a little bit easier...

 

Hope that helps.  Ski fast!

 

Oh, and I am with Richie on strengthening the core muscles.  I ended up with a compressed disk a few years back, some of the worst pain i have experienced. 

 

EDIT:  Forgot about the back protector - I use the POC one, works well for me and i like the support from the torso wrap (helps reduce the gut bulge in the suit as well!). I use it in GS as well as Speed events.  The Slytech looks good but also seems a little bulky to me.  Any thoughts from those using it?

Nice to hear confirmation that during the run cold is not felt much.  I plan to wear coveralls and stash a jacket at the bottom. Thanks for sharing your routine. I'll get it figured out after a few days I'm sure. POC back protector, check.  Looks like its between Slytech, Atomic, Head and POC.

Thanks ScottsSkier...Can barely wait to get on those skis you sent me.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BoredAtBMBW View Post

Slytech 2nd skin give nice warmth and protection.

Keep in mind the tighter the suit the more the fabric will stretch, and let air through.

I went to the Slytech site and liked what I saw, thanks.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

Snowfan,

 

I wear a normal base layer under my speed suit. I add a wind stopper vest, only because I have it. Adding too many layers under a suit will be restrictive. You will only need to take your jacket and pants off a few minutes before you start and during that time you should be exercising and moving about (running in place, for example) to keep your body limber and warm. If there is a delay, through a coat over your shoulders. I take any coat I find in a pinch. You won't notice the cold once you leave the start.

 

If you are going to be training and racing at Ski Cooper, know that the new start building has radiant heat in the ceiling over the start as well as a heated room for racers to wait in. Coats are shuttled from the top to bottom although the smart racers bring a bag full of coats to leave at the finish so that each run they can put on a coat, not having to wait for the shuttle. Other venues aren't quite so convenient but the bag of coats at the finish works everywhere.

 

Be happy they replaced the old Tiehack lift (15 minutes minumum) with a detach lift this year, so the Aspen Speed weekend will be much more bearable. smile.gif

 

MR

Baselayer and windstopper, that sounds perfect. Radiant heat...nice. No more Tiehack...sounds like I'm getting into this at the right time!  The bag of coats sounds great for training.  Thanks MastersRacer.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

Sibhusky ..... the old Japanese soldiers wore a .... similar .... er ... ball warmer into battle.  It was made from the skin of a badger and worn fur side in.

 

It was said that it gave courage.  Actually there is a martial arts technique that works quite well and has something to do with this.  Very effective! smile.gif

NOW you tell me.  I had a clan of badgers in my backyard all winter, now I have to BUY something.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

Hi Snowfan.   Yes I did.   I do use back protection and yes it also helps keep me warm.   As far as protection, the armor or the back protector, mine which is made by Head, works primarily against force put directly on the back, hitting an object with your back, landing squarely on your back etc. (both unlikely scenarios in skiing, but every bit helps I guess).   It also has what I would call a compression belt, or kidney belt, that helps give you a bit more thoracic support via containing internal pressure similar to how a weightlifter belt works, but its efficacy is very limited, because you see, I was wearing this protection when I suffered the compression fracture to my vertebrae.   There is really no practical way to protect against compression fractures, disk compression, and ruptures other than to avoid letting your butt hitting the snow at all cost, since your spine cannot absorb the impact it just starts to crush, that harder the fall the more damage.   I have a few bulges, I think two herniation's and busted the vertebrae....strengthening the back has made these issues a non.

 

 

Thanks Rich. The back protectors I've seen have a pad that extends over the tailbone but I'll try to remember not to land that way.  Easier to fix a hip than a back...I guess.  10-4 on the strengthening of the back.

 

 

post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

 

For extra cold weather, I often thought of putting a glove warmer (with sticky stuff), onto the merino or other undershirt and right over the kidneys.  They actually used to sell kits for hunters to do this and it has something to do with the blood and circulation near the core and kidney area.

 



30573301003_220x220_a.jpg

 

These work wonders on those really cold days. 

post #35 of 48
Thread Starter 

That looks excellent Susan...not too bulky in a critical spot.  Way better than a badger skin and much easier to acquire.

post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowfan View Post

Rich,

 

I recall you mentioning back protection sometime ago.  I broke my back and neck fifteen years ago and am looking for some real good back protection. What do you use now and do you recommend anything?



If you are racing stay away from the plastic back protectors and go with the Slytech, Dainese, POC, Ortema or Energiapura padded models. Plastic is only used these days for freeriding or big mountain skiing where you want to minimize puncture or penetration. Not real issues on the race course where shock absorption and impact distribution are more critical. They are also lower in profile for a more comfortable fit.

post #37 of 48
Thread Starter 

srd,

 

I've been looking over your site and have found a few items I need.  Thanks for the info regarding plastic v padded.

post #38 of 48

I race in Wisconsin and some of those January Night races get frigid, like -25 frigid. The only way I can stay warm is to get pumped up. Run around in your ski boots, box with someone, jump around. Anything to get the blood flowing. Keep your coat on as long as you possibly can, and I guess wearing a nice base layer underneath helps keep you warm. I have this Nike Compression top and the inside is a fleecy material - that helps, but basically I just freeze my ass of before every race, really there is no other option in Wisconsin, it's just cold. Hell sometimes we don't have school because of the cold.

 

Edit - I'm also a deer hunter and truly believe there is no way to stay warm sitting 30 feet up in a tree. The cold will get to you, the real question is how long can you deal with the cold before you have to walk back to camp.

post #39 of 48
At leaast at Sunburst it's only about 30 seconds until you're in the lodge. I hope you're not deer hunting in Jan. (Just some good natured kidding from a fellow "Badger")
post #40 of 48

One more thing. Where in Wisconsin do they call off school when it's too cold?

Never heard of that.rolleyes.gif

post #41 of 48

It adds bulk but on very cold days I wear a fleece vest under my speedsuit.

post #42 of 48

It's actually less than that, they built a food place about 25 feet from the bottom of the race run, I deer hunt in Hurley, Wi and it gets damned cold. They called off school three times last year due to the cold, i dunno whats up with that, but it doesn't bother me. We actually had an exam day last year where I thought the conditions were to shitty to drive in so I just snowmobiled to school. Ended up a friend who was in the ditch.

post #43 of 48

Marmot drycline wind shirt helps keep the wind out when worn under speed suit

 

 
DriClime Windshirt
post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Then get a coaches' coat:  https://www.skiracingdevelopment.com/product/ST-162

 

And some zipoff pants.  Shed right before you go down. 

 

And these: 

ballwarmer.img_assist_custom.jpg

 

LOL!


Oct 18, 2011

 

Hi Bears:

 

Been awhile since I've raced.  I didn't realize that racers had to pack a .44 magnum now.  What's it for?  Additional weight to get down faster?

 

Think snow,

 

CP

 

post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieP View Post

Oct 18, 2011

 

Hi Bears:

 

Been awhile since I've raced.  I didn't realize that racers had to pack a .44 magnum now.  What's it for?  Additional weight to get down faster?

 

Think snow,

 

CP

 

  The XL size is required for Speed events......ski.gif
 

 

post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

  The XL size is required for Speed events......ski.gif

 


Oct 18, 2011

 

Hi ScotsSkier:

 

Thanks for setting me straight on that.  I must really be behind the times.  So XL for Speed events, with the largest going to the DH event.

 

Think snow,

 

CP

 

post #47 of 48

Or of course there is also the combined internal warming /nerves calmer approach....good scotch!

 

 

 


 


Edited by ScotsSkier - 10/19/11 at 10:58am
post #48 of 48

I use something similar to canadianskiers wind shell. I find a sleeveless cycling windvest fits well under a racesuit and some of them have a longer tail which can give a little more lower back and kidney coverage. Of course down here in the land of Oz we can only dream of consistenly cold temps with the consequently firm and grippy race surface! Anyone have any ideas on rainproof under racesuit attire? Oh dear, I hope I haven't just jinxed next season!

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