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Rossignol 2012 skis and thoughts on 'integrated' bindings

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Alright, it's yet another 'help me choose gear' thread. Go ahead and leave if you're bored to death of these.

 

...

 

..right, still here?

 

Lovely! I'm a dual-cert instructor (CASI 1 and CSIA 1) looking to improve my skiing, hopefully to a CSIA 2/CSCF 1 and higher standard. I'm looking for one pair of skis/bindings that I can both manage now and that I can continue to learn on to the aforementioned skiing standards. Due to airline weight restrictions, I'm really limited to one pair of skis here and thanks to an arrangement through my employer I'm pretty much settled on Rossignol's 2012 skis/bindings unless I see a very, very good deal that will ship to Canada.

 

I ski and teach almost exclusively on well groomed, sometimes icy corduroy with a bit of slush in the spring but I'm looking for a ski that will also cope with New Zealand wind affected ice, bumps/chop and be somewhat competent in light powder. If I decide to move into park skiing then I'll look at a park/jib specific ski. I'm roughly 6' and 150 pounds or 65 kilos. I'm happy skiing any green/blue/mild black in anything but sheet ice conditions on rental skis but am less confident on real steeps, bumps and variable off-piste (Though am looking to improve in all of those areas) I've been taking skiing seriously for only about 2 seasons but have been snowboarding for 8 years so have a fair understanding of edging, gliding etc. Previous skis I've tried and liked were the rossi avenger 74 in 156 (A little skittish at speed) and 166 (Great fun for long carves) I'm currently looking at the experience 83 168cm and 88 162/170cm  as candidates, I don't think I'll need anything wider but by the same token I'm a little reticent to go with a narrower-waisted ski as float in powder is something I'd like to keep available. I notice that some of these rossi skis are offered with an 'integrated' binding - any thoughts on this? Pros vs Cons? and any suggestions as to bindings in terms of reliable and with a reasonable degree of feel? I ski on a DIN around 5.5 so shouldn't need anything too extreme.

 

Any thoughts and opinions welcome, cheers!

post #2 of 19

I think you are looking in the right place. Experience 83 or 88. You could probably flip a coin, but I'd say just get the 88. Probably in a 170. It's cool that you can buy it flat if you want, but unless you know exactly what you want (and you wouldn't be asking here if you did), I think you should just get the system binding.

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

Bit of an update - I had a chance to try some mid-fat (86mm) K2 Aftershocks today in a 174. They felt pretty damn chunky but I'm assuming that's more to do with length than width; edge-to-edge they were pretty mellow, maybe a bit more of a roll in the transition but not noticeably tippy. I guess I'm curious now what people's experience is with adding length - as I said above I'm considering going from a 166 to a 168 or a 170 - barring other characteristics of a ski does a couple of cm make much difference in terms of feel? Might be an impossible question but I figure it's worth a punt!

post #4 of 19

A couple of cm. is absolutely irrelevant. It is the difference in the ski itself that will be the larger difference. The skis that you mention are fine choices for your needs and your stature is certainly enough to consider the 168-170 length. As to the system vs. non system choice.....Some systems can make a difference but on the two Rossi models that you mention, it won't (or....at least not a notable one).

 

 

SJ

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 

I'm definitely starting to lean toward the E83 - I figure 5mm underfoot won't make much difference on the rare powder days I may get, especially when weighed up against hundreds of ski days on groomers! Thanks for the advice guys, always nice to have one's thinking checked over on a big decision.

post #6 of 19

FWIW, my home area is not dissimilar in terms of snow conditions (you have better views, I have better ice wink.gif), and most of the instructors favor a 78-84 mm width for most days, even in light chop. When there's some pow, they'll break out Bridges, S3's, Ones, that width. But also think the difference between the 83 and 88 may be pretty small, perhaps it should be decided on the deal you can get. I haven't skied the new Rossi's but suspect that for your size (I'm about 163 lbs these days), they'll work well. Agree with Jim that "system" will be fairly neutral. IMO the only system that's ever actually added significantly to a ski's performance is the Blizzard IQ. 

post #7 of 19

System binding vs adjustable?  I've had great experiences with Rosi (Axial2) bindings...but never have purchased as a "system" binding and as Jim mentions; does not offer anything really significant in the Rosi line (unless tied to an awesome price point).  But never mind that.  What I'd think you might consider is a binding that would allow you to dial fore/aft giving you some range dealing snow conditions and mount position with respect to an all mountain ski mentioning anything rocker, early rise, powerturn etc.  I also noticed you have some decisions on length of ski along with describing in a subsequent post certain characteristics you attribute to length.  Dunno but perhaps its your mount point which can have a significant play in your ski experience (of course with a bunch of other factors confounding everything which you must sort out).  Anywho...you could consider for a ski like the ex88 (which is a ski I'm considering as well) a binding such as the Griffon Schizo (per your described din spec), giving you a total of 3cm of travel either side boot center helping to dial in that ski to youz.  Oh, and while bindings like these will add a bit of weight, I don't get caught up in that crap.  We're skiing...not running, cycling or dancing ;)  Good luck, ski well this season.   

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 

So just to be clear - with an integrated or system binding, both the toe and heel pieces are on sliders, correct? I'm assuming then that by setting the binding to the correct boot sole length and then clicking the toe and heel back or forward an equal number of notches, I could effectively move the mount point forward or back on the ski? And finally, is there any real difference between rental bindings and integrated? it seems they would both suffer from some amount of 'slop' that a fixed binding would not.

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kendal View Post

So just to be clear - with an integrated or system binding, both the toe and heel pieces are on sliders, correct? I'm assuming then that by setting the binding to the correct boot sole length and then clicking the toe and heel back or forward an equal number of notches, I could effectively move the mount point forward or back on the ski? And finally, is there any real difference between rental bindings and integrated? it seems they would both suffer from some amount of 'slop' that a fixed binding would not.


Quick reply to three q's

No.

Depends on the binding.

Yes.
post #10 of 19

The Rossi system binding as offered on the Exp 83 has independently adjustable toe and heel pieces. If you choose to do so, you can adjust fore and aft of the suggested mount point. FWIW.....the Experience models seem to have a pretty well thought out factory mount point. I am fairly sensitive to sub-optimal mount points and the Rossis do not throw me any red flags in that regard.

 

Donworryaboudit

 

SJ

post #11 of 19

I have just had three days on the E83 with integrated binding. (Hards snow softening a bit in the afternoon, some bumps)

I thought the toe and heal pieces of some previous integrated bindings were a bit sloppy on the track but these are solid.

The ski skis short and is a bit squirly on the flat at speed on hard snow.

The early rise tip hits the snow when the ski is tipped about 30 degrees (guess not measurement) so you roll into a long turn and the ski becomes long and smooth, no speed problem.

If you go for a quick high edge the ski will hook up like a slalom ski and you can feel like Marcel Hirsher.

I am on a176 (5,10 170lbs) and would suggest that if you are in between lenghts go for the longer one.

   

post #12 of 19

Any updates on the E83 vs. E88's. I just went with the 83's but had the same dilemma. I am on east coast so we get few powder days... coming from a 73mm ski. I did not want to jump to a thick of a waist.

post #13 of 19

I had the 2011 Rosi. Ti avenger 82 in 170mm. I just switched to the 2012 ti avenger in 177. I had about 5 days on the 170 with the intergrated bind. and I think they are fine. I love the ski but for my weight I thought the 177 would be better for me (5'11, 200 lbs) I dont know why there is not more love for this ski on epicski, they have great ratings and very nice to ski in your conditions.

post #14 of 19
post #15 of 19

the question about appreciation for Rossignol models?

 

Personally, I've had great experience with Rossignol skis and encourage you to get some.

 

if you can get the ski flat, then when it's worn out you can take off the bindings to put them on another ski. saves about $200, which of course is

 

edit to simplify and delete sarcasm


Edited by davluri - 11/4/11 at 3:24pm
post #16 of 19

im curious about this.

 

I had a chance to ski the 83 in a 168 length and a 88 in a 178 length.  (advanced skier 150lbs 5'11'') 

 

I found the 83 at 168 super playful and fun, not amazingly quick but blown away by the edge grip and how light it was,

 

I hated the 88, in a 178.  I found it too long and chunky and not nearly as playful or fun as the 83, slower edge to edge, heavier and less mobile.  Now I think this has a whole lot to do with two things.  I live out west but was skiing east coast groomers this weekend, and the 88 was too long.  I feel that for me, i would buy the 170 in the 88.  (my pow day ski is a 188cm rossi S7)

 

I didnt get the chance to try the 170 E88 though and wont make my decision until i get that chance. I want something that can do moguls as thats what i spend my time doing when its not a pow day on the S7.  but i want the ability to do mild pow as the S7 is pretty wide for just little dumps.  Light, stable, playful, fun, forgiving ski thats versitle is what i want and i think the 88 may be that ski

 

Im looking for a replacement for my contact 10's that is more forgiving and playful and more versitile for varying conditions.  Western skier - kicking horse, louise, revelstoke etc.

post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirk Singleton View Post

I had the 2011 Rosi. Ti avenger 82 in 170mm. I just switched to the 2012 ti avenger in 177. I had about 5 days on the 170 with the intergrated bind. and I think they are fine. I love the ski but for my weight I thought the 177 would be better for me (5'11, 200 lbs) I dont know why there is not more love for this ski on epicski, they have great ratings and very nice to ski in your conditions.



You're right! I just demoed them and I'm going to buy one pair! I largely prefered them to the blizzard magnum 8.5 (will replace the 8.7 next year) and the others. I tried them at 170 and they were perfect in bumps, steep, trees, carves nicely and stable at speed! So please can someone explain to me why I hesitate between buying them at that lenght or going more toward the 177 ( lenght that is more near what I am use to for my Mustang , kendo and sultan 85!) !!!!th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #18 of 19

I am getting ready to sell my Experience 88's 178 with Axial140's w.in a week. Skis have about 18 days on them and will have a fresh Start Haus tune and stone grind. $475.00 shipped. 

post #19 of 19

As a fellow instructor, I strongly recommend a set of park skis. They are built strong, so they can take the abuse from people skiing over them, into them, etc. As well, the soft flex makes them super easy to ski at lower speeds. Also, having a twin-tip style ski helps a ton, I spend 80% of my lessons skiing switch. Finally, park skis are cheap, so when they get wrecked, it doesn't cost as much as other skis to replace. However, if you choose to go with the E-series, I know a fair number of guys who ski them and love them. It's all personal preference, buy what you like to ski. Just my 2 cents.

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