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Good video series on learning to ski?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

Does anyone know of a series of videos on youtube or something that would be used to learn how to ski?  I'm going to start this winter and I want to have something skiing related to think about while I wait for snow.

post #2 of 26

http://www.yourskicoach.com/YourSkiCoach/Ski_Instruction_DVD_Video.html

 

Rick Schnellmann's Building Blocks is pretty comprehensive. I believe you can buy them individually.

 

Also Harald Harb's Performance Skiing dvd is great -- I watch it once or twice a week. It's not for beginners, but it's good stoke for everyday skiing.

 

 


Edited by MidwestPete - 9/11/11 at 3:14pm
post #3 of 26

LogicX, what kind of skis and gear are you going to get? Where are you going to ski?

post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 

Umm... regular skis for... regular terrain?  I don't know.

post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by LogicX View Post

Umm... regular skis for... regular terrain?  I don't know.


 

ROTF.gif

 

That's the best answer ever!

 

I don't mean to laugh but in this forum, including me, people obsess about the length, turn radius, stiffness and even if the skis were made on a Tuesday or Thursday.

 

Regular terrain!  I know you mean groomed trails but here again, people obsess about that.  Hardpack, icy, powder, deep snow, crud, corn, steeps, blues, blacks, greens, back country, side country, country and western, etc.

 

Don't worry.  Your answer let us know you're a normal person living a normal life.  By the end of this season however, you'll be as hooked as we are and no matter what you ski on this season, you'll be obsessing about what to get for next.

 

Besides, I wouldn't worry about getting gear until you've been out a time or two.  Rentals will be fine your first couple times out. As soon as you're sure you are going to stick with it, buy your gear then.  Start with the boots then the skis.  Just know ahead of time that if you like skiing on rental gear, you'll love it on your own.

 

Everyone wants to get skis first but you will hear a thousand times here, and everywhere - boots first!

 

As far as ski videos, Mr. Google has several if you ask the right way.  As an instructor I'm obligated to say "take lessons!" as I really do think it will fast track you to skiing better, but I watch ski videos all the time too.  The trick is to find videos that compliment what you're trying to do and most teach "how to ski better" and not so much on "how to ski.".

 

Have fun,

Ken

 


Edited by L&AirC - 9/12/11 at 5:27pm
post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by LogicX View Post

Does anyone know of a series of videos on youtube or something that would be used to learn how to ski?  I'm going to start this winter and I want to have something skiing related to think about while I wait for snow.

You might find that the first few videos on this site helpful. If you have any questions about the information I would be happy to try and answer them.
 

http://skiherenow.blogspot.com/
 

 

post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by LogicX View Post

Umm... regular skis for... regular terrain?  I don't know.



This is pritty much the anwere I was hoping to get. So many people nowadays are way ahead of themselves before they hit the slopes and snow. I love when beginners start off by telling the instructor "thats not what they said on the internet....." LOL. Like Ken mentioned here above, dont buy own stuff. Rent the first times. And yes, boots are the most important but do not buy 500 dollar boots with a 500 dollar alignment fit before you get the feel for how it works. And yes, take a lesson the first time you come to the slopes. The very first time.

 

post #8 of 26

You're my favorite new forum poster.  Seriously - that was awesome in its humbleness.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LogicX View Post

Umm... regular skis for... regular terrain?  I don't know.



 

post #9 of 26
Thread Starter 

:D  Thanks guys.

 

A place around me has a deal for renting for the whole season for like $75 (like half price of normal)  so I'm gonna do that the first year.  Their "high performance skis" which are usually even more expensive than "regular" skis are also marked down to $75 right now.  This seems like one of those nitty gritty issues where people are going to have opinions on what I should get as a beginner, so have at it!  Just remember I'm going to be drooling over the shiny "high performance" skis if they are the same price so if you want me to go for the regular ones you better have a good reason smile.gif

 

Also, through my university I can get an unlimited ski pass to every ski resort around here for $150.  So basically I get to avoid that whole big initial investment phase and ski my first season for like $225.  Pretty good deal.

post #10 of 26

One of the best answers I've come across!

 

 

I would defer to an instructor, but doing some research on the Internetz doesn't hurt for the most part.  Here are some links for you:

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/LasseLyck#p/u/1/aofTCdhlyyY

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/sikultura#p/u/19/lQqkjCZeRUg

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/elatemedia#p/u/22/TapM2diK_OY

 

http://www.mechanicsofsport.com/skiing/manoeuvres/skis_on.html

 

They're varying degrees of help, take them for what they are; no substitute for actual lessons with a real person.  You'll not only learn faster but also have more FUN.  Remember not to get too frustrated at first, it will take a bit of time to get the hang of things.  But it will be worth it!

 

post #11 of 26
Hi LogicX, and welcome to EpicSki and to the great sport of skiing!

Frankly, I would not recommend that you try to learn from any of the "learn how to ski" videos that others have suggested. Not that they're all bad--although I suggest that some of them will probably misinform or at least confuse you--but really, the best thing you can do for yourself at this stage of the game is watch images of just plain great skiing, at the highest levels. Watch World Cup racers. Watch freestylers. Watch experts ski powder. Watch the best, performing at the highest levels!

No, you will not look like that on your first day, but the fundamentals of what the best in the world do is what you want to incorporate into your own skiing. When you watch great skiing, avoid the temptation to get too analytical. Just sit back and let the energy, flow, and rhythm sink into your subconscious. Visualize what it would feel like to do what you see--the build-up and release of pressure, the G-forces, the floating, gliding, free-falling sensations those experts clearly show. Feel the exhilaration they feel. Observe the purposefulness of their movements--as well as the purpose. Ask yourself, "WHY are they turning?"--not HOW.

Notice how easy and effortless they make it look. And do not underestimate the significance of that easiness! If you try to make it "hard," if you get too analytical, if it hurts...you are doing it wrong at the most fundamental of levels. Skiing is about gliding, flowing, and playing with gravity, not about "technique," and certainly not about fighting against gravity. Much of what you would see in those "how to learn to ski" videos, well-intentioned though they may be--will be static, linear, technical, and completely the opposite of where I would recommend you focus at first--and especially now, before you even get to the snow. The effortlessness, freedom, joy, and harmony with gravity that expert skiers exude is the goal. Let it be where you start!

Learning is easy. Intent and tactics dictate technique--not the other way around. When you finally get to the slopes, take some lessons from high-level instructors (private lessons if you can afford them). The movements they teach you and the experiences they lead you through will make sense in the context of the images and sensations you've visualized. But without those images, they'll just be "technique" without purpose. Adopt the right state of mind--what I call the "GO! Factor"--that is fundamentally the same as the expert's way of thinking, and the right technique will come naturally. It will be easy. Your instructor will correct errors as needed, but you'll discover great skiing, "from the word GO!" The movements you'll learn will be fundamentally identical to the movements you've watched the experts make, even though they will not look the same at the much lower speeds and gentler terrain you'll start out with.

Consider that when you learned to walk, you did not focus on some sort of "beginner technique." You watched Mom and Dad--experts!--and did your best to imitate what they did. Your first stumbling baby steps may not have looked much like the skillful, refined steps of expert walkers, at least superficially. But fundamentally, they were the same thing, needing only experience, practice, and refinement to evolve to your current level of expertise. Skiing is the same. You didn't learn to make baby steps by analyzing other toddlers making baby steps. Don't make the mistake of trying to learn to ski that way!

Trust me on this! As a long-time instructor and student of this sport, I am as technically curious and fascinated as they come. Skiing is, indeed, a highly technical sport. But beware of getting so caught up in the technique that you lose the purpose, especially at the beginning. Start with the end in mind. Only then will the beginning be easy. Good technique will come!

Give your body the opportunity to explore, experiment, and even make mistakes. Play! If necessary, your instructor will make you sure don't get too far off track, and that you don't start to develop bad habits. But don't be afraid to make a few mistakes. Your body is a remarkable learning machine, if you give it a chance and a clear sense of purpose--if you don't block it with a lot of purposeless technical garbage.

There is little more exhilarating than the lightning speed of learning that you can only experience as a beginner. Savor the learning process itself. Play. Enjoy. Have fun! Visualize the end, and take baby steps.

Best regards,
Bob
post #12 of 26

 

Quote:So basically I get to avoid that whole big initial investment phase and ski my first season for like $225.  Pretty good deal.
 
Great deal: Go for  the season rentals ! Unlikely that the "Performance Ski" will be too much ski for a beginner, considering they re going for only $75 for a season rental (even at 2X that price -it's a good deal). Yeah - Go for the performance ski !

 

post #13 of 26

If you're a university student your university probably has a ski club and they probably have some deal with a local resort for a lesson package ( my public HS does).  This might add a $100  or so to your ski season but 6 weekly group lessons or whatever they offer would be well worth it if they are a  decent ski school. I'd suggest you check it out.  Even  at a total of $325 your entire season is only about 60% of the cost of my season pass alone !

post #14 of 26
Thread Starter 

My ski club does have a deal for 3 lessons for $30.  I will be doing that.  It would be really cool if I could keep buying lessons at that rate but I'm guessing it's a one time deal.

post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILOJ View Post

 

 



I agree that the performance ski will probably not be too much for a beginner, but we don't know for sure. I recommend you stick with the basic beginner setup. If there is a performance difference with the "nicer" ski, it won't help you learn any faster, it will only hurt.

 

Performance skis won't help you ski any better unless you already know how to ski and can recognize how a ski feels.

post #16 of 26

Quote:

Originally Posted by ILOJ View Post

Great deal: Go for  the season rentals ! Unlikely that the "Performance Ski" will be too much ski for a beginner, considering they re going for only $75 for a season rental (even at 2X that price -it's a good deal). Yeah - Go for the performance ski !

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drew Phillips View Post


I agree that the performance ski will probably not be too much for a beginner, but we don't know for sure. I recommend you stick with the basic beginner setup. If there is a performance difference with the "nicer" ski, it won't help you learn any faster, it will only hurt.

 

Performance skis won't help you ski any better unless you already know how to ski and can recognize how a ski feels.



 

But the performance skis are usually in better shape and better wax than regualr rentals.  Ferrari's can still idle through a parking lot.  You don't need a Kia to do that.  A performance ski can do everything a beginner ski can.  A beginner can't do everything and advanced skier can.  At least it won't be the gear holding you back.

 

I wouldn't give the same advice about race stock skis, but a correctly sized, well tuned performance rental ski is a better learning tool than a beat up low performance rental.

 

MO,

Ken

post #17 of 26


Quote:

Originally Posted by LogicX View Post

Umm... regular skis for... regular terrain?  I don't know.


Great answer.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LogicX View Post

:D  Thanks guys.

 

A place around me has a deal for renting for the whole season for like $75 (like half price of normal)  so I'm gonna do that the first year.  Their "high performance skis" which are usually even more expensive than "regular" skis are also marked down to $75 right now.  This seems like one of those nitty gritty issues where people are going to have opinions on what I should get as a beginner, so have at it!  Just remember I'm going to be drooling over the shiny "high performance" skis if they are the same price so if you want me to go for the regular ones you better have a good reason smile.gif

 

Also, through my university I can get an unlimited ski pass to every ski resort around here for $150.  So basically I get to avoid that whole big initial investment phase and ski my first season for like $225.  Pretty good deal.


I'm an optimist and believe that staff should know their product. Especially when I am uninformed, I refer to them for advice. I'd tell them I was a beginner and ask them if THEIR performance skis are too much for you. I have seen 'high performance ski rentals' that are merely new recreational models and not what I would consider high performance skis that are too much for a beginner.

 

As an instructor, I always advice the first few times you ski to be with a professional instructor for many reasons. Safety is a huge one. Simple things like getting on and off lifts, going on appropriate terrain, ski etiquette etc can be shown to you properly. Friends teaching friends can be disastrous in so many ways. I wouldn't learn to drive by jumping into a car by myself or with a mate and getting onto the roads immediately. I got an instructor to teach me in a driving school. But that's my personality and I know of others who have actually learnt skiing by the equivalent of heading straight into a 4 lane highway. Some are still alive :)

 

 

post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwestPete View Post

http://www.yourskicoach.com/YourSkiCoach/Ski_Instruction_DVD_Video.html

 

Rick Schnellmann's Building Blocks is pretty comprehensive. I believe you can buy them individually.

 

Also Harald Harb's Performance Skiing dvd is great -- I watch it once or twice a week. It's not for beginners, but it's good stoke for everyday skiing.

 

 


Thumbs up to both.  Also check out Lito Tejada's videos.  My advice is to get as many as you can and soak them all up, but don't rely on only one and take some real lessons too.

 

 

 

 

post #19 of 26

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwestPete View Post

http://www.yourskicoach.com/YourSkiCoach/Ski_Instruction_DVD_Video.html

 

Rick Schnellmann's Building Blocks is pretty comprehensive. I believe you can buy them individually.

 

Also Harald Harb's Performance Skiing dvd is great -- I watch it once or twice a week. It's not for beginners, but it's good stoke for everyday skiing.

 

 


Thumbs up to both.  Also check out Lito Tejada's videos.  My advice is to get as many as you can and soak them all up, but don't rely on only one and take some real lessons too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by borntoski683 View Post


Thumbs up to both.  Also check out Lito Tejada's videos.  My advice is to get as many as you can and soak them all up, but don't rely on only one and take some real lessons too.

 

 

 

 

 

Yes -- I like Lito's videos too, although my last dvd of his I own is about 10 years old.  Weem's dvd/book is good as well.
 

 

post #20 of 26

i've always wanted to check out harb's PMTS books and videos...love his youtube videos....i have rick's video series....they're good with many useful exercises

also i bought the 'little book about skiing better' ...some great tips for us all to remember and only 10bucks or so.

http://www.google.ca/#hl=en&sugexp=ppwl&cp=31&gs_id=3b&xhr=t&q=little+book+about+skiing+better&pf=p&sclient=psy-ab&source=hp&pbx=1&oq=little+book+about+skiing+better&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&gs_sm=&gs_upl=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&fp=56aef1eff154aa34&biw=1173&bih=579

 

consider, too, joining a local ski club: form some friendships with people with your skill level (or even a bit more advanced to keep gently 'pushing' you  to improve)....also will help with keeping at it consistently: and that's a key with any series of new challenging skills: consistency and feedback, if you want to improve (aside from proper fitting equipment for your skill levels/goals)

 

also, if you find you like skiing, try to set some goals for yourself ie "I want to get out skiing ___ x this season" , esp if you're lucky enough to live near a decent ski hill.  or have some goals such as what hills you wants to master or skills to develop....keeps you motivated and working....if you don't use it you lose it, afterall.

 

have fun icon14.gif

 


Edited by canali - 11/11/11 at 8:50am
post #21 of 26


bob, i love how you've 'reframed' some ideas  to skiing (i snipped it below and bolded parts that 'spoke to me')....refreshing icon14.gif....that is one thing i liked about 'the little book about skiing better' which i just finished and am re=reading ..alot of it is about balance (from core) and feeling how the skis are operating and moving the way you want them to in open, fluid situations (since the terrain etc is always changing)...not about getting so technically hung up on exact textbook technique (which i'm bad for)....in short, getting away from 'over thinking' too much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

 When you watch great skiing, avoid the temptation to get too analytical. Just sit back and let the energy, flow, and rhythm sink into your subconscious. Visualize what it would feel like to do what you see--the build-up and release of pressure, the G-forces, the floating, gliding, free-falling sensations those experts clearly show. Feel the exhilaration they feel. Observe the purposefulness of their movements--as well as the purpose. Ask yourself, "WHY are they turning?"--not HOW.
Notice how easy and effortless they make it look. And do not underestimate the significance of that easiness! If you try to make it "hard," if you get too analytical, if it hurts...you are doing it wrong at the most fundamental of levels. Skiing is about gliding, flowing, and playing with gravity, not about "technique," and certainly not about fighting against gravity. Much of what you would see in those "how to learn to ski" videos, well-intentioned though they may be--will be static, linear, technical, and completely the opposite of where I would recommend you focus at first--and especially now, before you even get to the snow. The effortlessness, freedom, joy, and harmony with gravity that expert skiers exude is the goal. Let it be where you start!
 Skiing is, indeed, a highly technical sport. But beware of getting so caught up in the technique that you lose the purpose, especially at the beginning. Start with the end in mind. Only then will the beginning be easy. Good technique will come!
Give your body the opportunity to explore, experiment, and even make mistakes. Play! If necessary, your instructor will make you sure don't get too far off track, and that you don't start to develop bad habits. But don't be afraid to make a few mistakes. Your body is a remarkable learning machine, if you give it a chance and a clear sense of purpose--if you don't block it with a lot of purposeless technical garbage.
There is little more exhilarating than the lightning speed of learning that you can only experience as a beginner. Savor the learning process itself. Play. Enjoy. Have fun! Visualize the end, and take baby steps.
Best regards,
Bob


 


Edited by canali - 11/12/11 at 9:30am
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

 

http://www.mechanicsofsport.com/skiing/manoeuvres/skis_on.html

 

They're varying degrees of help, take them for what they are; no substitute for actual lessons with a real person.



This link is only good for getting ski on and off the rest is out dated by 20 years IMO

 

post #23 of 26

Consider renting a helmet. Goggles aren't a must, but I wouldn't ski with out them.

 

Have fun.  Take small candy bars for the lift rides. 

 

Wear jeans with a sports team jacket - Dallas Cowboys jackets are always in fashion, America's team and all that.  If not renting a helmet, wear one of those furry rendezvous type caps.

 

Remember pizza, french fries... pizza, french fries... pizza, french fries.

post #24 of 26

uhhh, nix the jeans and team jackets, I suppose that was a joke....wear clothing that allows alot of freedom of movement and are at least fairly windproof and if possible water resistant. Layer your clothes with a wicking layer as your base and stay away from cotton-its not your friend skiing. Good warm insulated gloves or mitts will make you much more comfortable too, again preferably wind and water resistant if not proof. Just so you don't get off on the wrong foot...

post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by bugs View Post

Consider renting a helmet. Goggles aren't a must, but I wouldn't ski with out them.

 

Have fun.  Take small candy bars for the lift rides. 

 

 



Some form of eye protection is a must.   I mean that.  With the reflection off the snow you need to protect the mach one eye ball.

 

post #26 of 26


Thats the best $30 you will ever spend on skiing.  But a solid beginning to burning multiples of $30 dollar increments.  Study hard you'll need a good job with lots of holidays!

 

Performance gear or not to be performance gear,  I reckon you will crash either just as well.   Just be careful of needing to pay for damage on performance skis,  sometimes this can be in the contract,  more so with demos though!

 

enjoy! 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LogicX View Post

My ski club does have a deal for 3 lessons for $30.  I will be doing that.  It would be really cool if I could keep buying lessons at that rate but I'm guessing it's a one time deal.



 

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