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Womens powder skis - Page 3

post #61 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

From the description of your skiing style, it sounds like you would be well suited to a forgiving soft snow oriented everyday ski (around 100m under foot wiht some rocker to it) like the Blizzard Crush, Rossi S3, Atomic Access, etc...  If you are going to have just 2 pair of skis -- then forget about Praxis Powders and anything much wider than a S7 womens or RP112 ... For the resort skier fun shape skis are purely quiver skis and you would want an everyday ski to complement them -- not a carving ski.

 

Also I thought Bannf was in rain shadow and does not get all that much powder on average, perhaps I am wrong. If not its another count against powder specifics...


Tromano, if a person is having issues skiing in powder, what is the easiest ski you ever used in Powder?  For me it was a Praxis Powder, as long as I didn't have to ski hard packed groomers back to the lift.  Knowing she will have to deal with that issue, The RX or the Protest gives her the float and smearability of the Pows, but they are more managable back to the lift with a bit of traditional side cut. If she feel those suggestions are to wide/ full bodied then perhaps the Mountain Jib in a 183 would be a better combo with her Dynastars at 135/112/130, but they will not float like the Pows, RX or Protest.  If she is price conscious, the Praxis while on sale are the best pow ski for the buck IMO.  If she has more cash to spend, than the DPS 112's or Lhasa Pow's would be my suggestion.

Also, if Alberta is in a rain window during winter, the Global Warmingz are on us.wink.gif

 

post #62 of 81


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiincanada View Post

Wow! Thanks for all of the responses everyone.....there is some definite food for thought in your suggestions.

 

To answer a few of the questions that came up:

 

I live in Banff - and normally ski Lake Louise, Sunshine and Fernie.

I'm 5foot 10 and weigh approximately 160 pounds.

I'm a strong skier on piste and love my dynstar carvers that really stick to the snow. However, having very little experience with 'real' powder I seem to lose all ability and just need to find some skis and an attitude that will encourage me to get off those groomers! Thanks again everyone. I'm going to take your advice and try out as many demos as I can to find the right ski for me :-)

 



 

With these stats and location where you ski, if you're looking for a ski to compliment your carvers, I'd go with powder specific and not try to get anything that not powder specific.  That being said, I'd get the DPS Yvette in (at least) 178cm, or the Rossi S7 or S7W in  178.

(from my demo experience)  

Admittedly, my experience with powder skis is mostly Sierra Powder, which can be somewhat different than what you experience.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiincanada View Post

I struggled my way through a season in Canada last year on my New Zealand carving skis. The powder was just everywhere and I would end up falling my way down the slope, sinking deeper and deeper and getting more and more frustrated with every run. So, I'm wanting to invest in some decent powder skis. I'm generally a blue/black run kind of girl. I'm looking at Line Pandora skis....does anyone have any experience with these? Or does anyone have any recommendations for me?

 

Here's hoping for a more stress free season this year!



 


Edited by Trekchick - 9/13/11 at 6:22pm
post #63 of 81

almost anything rockered 100+ under foot will be fun in banff powder.   If you want to talk to my wife (we have been in banff 20 years, she is ex-heli ski guide, and can help point you in the right direction

dave@fatskideals.com

post #64 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post

 

Tromano, if a person is having issues skiing in powder, what is the easiest ski you ever used in Powder?  For me it was a Praxis Powder, as long as I didn't have to ski hard packed groomers back to the lift.  Knowing she will have to deal with that issue, The RX or the Protest gives her the float and smearability of the Pows, but they are more managable back to the lift with a bit of traditional side cut. If she feel those suggestions are to wide/ full bodied then perhaps the Mountain Jib in a 183 would be a better combo with her Dynastars at 135/112/130, but they will not float like the Pows, RX or Protest.  If she is price conscious, the Praxis while on sale are the best pow ski for the buck IMO.  If she has more cash to spend, than the DPS 112's or Lhasa Pow's would be my suggestion.

Also, if Alberta is in a rain window during winter, the Global Warmingz are on us.wink.gif

 

 

Glad to hear about the rain window icon14.gif

 

I certainly would agree, praxis pow are the best powder skis I have used... Still, the difference between a soft flexing rockered ski around 100mm underfoot and a praxis powder for resort powder skiing is really not all that much most of the time IMO. Sometimes (when the snow is crusty or wind effected) the praxis really skis alot better, but most of the time for me the snow is good enough that its just not that different. I think we are talking maybe 10-20% or so. I guess it depends on the local conditions.

 

If she were talking about going in the BC where snow lasts a lot longer and the surface snow has time to age and develop crusts and layers then yea the praxis powder is the pick.

 

But in the context of a resort skier who skis mostly blue and black runs -- I mean yes you want to be on a specialized powder ski-- but you really need a solid every day ski for the resort -- and a nice fat 100mm wide ski will be a great improvement from her carvers when the snow is soft. It also makes sense if she wants to work on technique or whatever -- to do that on a more conventional ski. From the praxis lineup, I would think something like a Praxis BC would be plenty of ski for a resort powder ski that also can do well everyday.

post #65 of 81

I see the conundrum Tromano is addressing. Assuming Kiwi's carvers are around 78mm waist, if she adds a pair of powder specific skis, I would qualify that as anything over 110mm, she still has no daily driver for a place like the Wasatch. It wouldn't be such a terrible problem, 78's and 115's, but the gap is there. If a person had a daily driver in the 95 to 100 range, a designated 115+ powder ski would be a no-brainer as the complement. That's the issue as I see it. smile.gif

post #66 of 81

^^^^Guys, I agree she needs two pairs of new skiswink.gif  One to fill that 95-105 spot and then the deep pow boards.  I had the Back Country's and regretted I didn't buy the slightly fatter Mountain Jib.  Heck at the sale price with another 10% of for EPIC, I am having a really hard time restraining myself and not buying the 183's too.biggrin.gif  For the price and getting something fat enough to make her have fun in pow, while still being easy to ski all the time, the Mtn Jib is my final answer.  Trust me, she could use that ski everyday. Read it's description on the Praxis site.


Edited by liv2 ski - 9/13/11 at 9:00pm
post #67 of 81

OK, the Mountain Jib is just what the name implies, a ski for jibbing around the mountain, which means going switch a high percentage of time and moves. I think Volkl came out with and immediately dumped their all mountain jib ski, the ChopStick, and look around...see any? anywhere? It's a highly specialized tool, and if you don't ride switch, you're giving up performance in areas you do need. Just to crit each model individually. It's not a particular model that needs to be found, it's more a class.

post #68 of 81

I hadn't really looked at the Praxis Mtn Jib too much and not skied them either. But yea, they are softer so could probably work as a forgiving powder / soft snow oriented ski. The flex is a trade off too stiff and the powder performance suffers, too soft and they will feel skitish at speed. I would think the softer flex might suit her given the description of her skiing.

 

My concern with this type of ski is the taper and mount point -- which Dav aluded to. Basically for a newbie powder skier one of the things that they typically seem to have trouble with -- and the thing that fat skis are supposed to provide-- is making it easy to balance over your skis. When you minimize taper on the ski and use a more center mount that makes it means you have to have better dynamic balance to stay over the ski. Which are skills that she may still be developing. Some of this can be mitigated by mounting further aft...

 

 

post #69 of 81



I think Davluri and Ira can relate on this one....... To them, this is gi-normous.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

now if this were carpenters talkin'....



 

post #70 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiincanada View Post

Wow! Thanks for all of the responses everyone.....there is some definite food for thought in your suggestions.

 

To answer a few of the questions that came up:

 

I live in Banff - and normally ski Lake Louise, Sunshine and Fernie.

I'm 5foot 10 and weigh approximately 160 pounds.

I'm a strong skier on piste and love my dynstar carvers that really stick to the snow. However, having very little experience with 'real' powder I seem to lose all ability and just need to find some skis and an attitude that will encourage me to get off those groomers! Thanks again everyone. I'm going to take your advice and try out as many demos as I can to find the right ski for me :-)

 


I'm 5'6" 135 Lbs

This is a picture of me skiing the Line Pandora in a 162cm length at Northstar last winter when we had fluffy thigh deep snow.

It was a very fun day.  If you still want, and can get the Line Pandora in a good length for you.  Do it! 

P1040795.JPG

 

 

post #71 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski-ra View Post

Hmm...last I checked 2mm is...uh...well...precisely 0.0787401 inches.  Since this is just a whisker (which is about 0.1mm in diameter) more than a 1/16th of an inch (which is 6 times bigger than a whisker) then 2mm must be more like a smidge than a whisker, or would it be more like a titch...will have to research further....biggrin.gif



Now wait a minute, where did you get that value for a whisker? 

 

"In my research, I have found the diameter of human hair to range from 17 to 181 µm (or 0.00067 to 0.0071 in)"  http://hypertextbook.com/facts/1999/BrianLey.shtml

 

Or are we talking about the length of a whisker ... which, based on the average beard growth of 0.5 in./month and assuming that the man in question shaves every day, would be 0.017 in.

 
post #72 of 81



WOW! Some one did their home work last night????biggrin.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post





Now wait a minute, where did you get that value for a whisker? 

 

"In my research, I have found the diameter of human hair to range from 17 to 181 µm (or 0.00067 to 0.0071 in)"  http://hypertextbook.com/facts/1999/BrianLey.shtml

 

Or are we talking about the length of a whisker ... which, based on the average beard growth of 0.5 in./month and assuming that the man in question shaves every day, would be 0.017 in.

 


 

post #73 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

I certainly would agree, praxis pow are the best powder skis I have used... Still, the difference between a soft flexing rockered ski around 100mm underfoot and a praxis powder for resort powder skiing is really not all that much most of the time IMO. Sometimes (when the snow is crusty or wind effected) the praxis really skis alot better, but most of the time for me the snow is good enough that its just not that different. I think we are talking maybe 10-20% or so. I guess it depends on the local conditions.


+1.  I just sold my Praxis Powders because, after I got the 112RPs last season, I skied them a total of 4 runs.  They came so close in soft snow that it was nearly a wash, and on the groomed, it wasn't a question.  (Not that they're soft....)

post #74 of 81

Womens powder - is best skiing event in the world

post #75 of 81

I skied my Johnny 94 in the powder all year and loved them.  I'm 5'5" about 140 and female.  I teach at Castle Mountain ski hill.  That said i demo'ed quite a few skis from the ski shop on the hill.  I took the Kiku's one of the days I went cat skiing and really didn't like them for me. My favorite ski was a wider, twin tip Kung Fujas ( women's version is apparently the Miss Behaved) but it was recommended i take the mens and use longer.  I love them.  My advice, really really go try a few pairs.  Everyone loves the Kiku but it didn't feel right for me or how I skied.  The kung fujas floated, took air and landed like I had nothing on my feet and turned instantly in the trees and powder.  I loved them.

 

You have to try some or you are just setting yourself up to be disappointed and don't toss your KIWI skis, there are days you'll use them, and sometimes poor snow years, even in Canada.  That's not going to happen this year though :P.  Not while I'm out there!

post #76 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by lady_Salina View Post

I skied my Johnny 94 in the powder all year and loved them.  I'm 5'5" about 140 and female.  I teach at Castle Mountain ski hill.  That said i demo'ed quite a few skis from the ski shop on the hill.  I took the Kiku's one of the days I went cat skiing and really didn't like them for me. My favorite ski was a wider, twin tip Kung Fujas ( women's version is apparently the Miss Behaved) but it was recommended i take the mens and use longer.  I love them.  My advice, really really go try a few pairs.  Everyone loves the Kiku but it didn't feel right for me or how I skied.  The kung fujas floated, took air and landed like I had nothing on my feet and turned instantly in the trees and powder.  I loved them.

 

You have to try some or you are just setting yourself up to be disappointed and don't toss your KIWI skis, there are days you'll use them, and sometimes poor snow years, even in Canada.  That's not going to happen this year though :P.  Not while I'm out there!


Definitely follow this advice. Lady_Salina knows what's up. And skis like it. biggrin.gif

 

post #77 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSloan View Post




Definitely follow this advice. Lady_Salina knows what's up. And skis like it. biggrin.gif

 


X2

 

The only disclaimer is.......we could go down to Lowes and pick up a couple sheets of plywood  and Lady Salina could ski them like they're high performance skis.

 

 

post #78 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post




X2

 

The only disclaimer is.......we could go down to Lowes and pick up a couple sheets of plywood  and Lady Salina could ski them like they're high performance skis.

 

 



True that . . . we should try her on some of my old school water skis next Gathering. tongue.gif

post #79 of 81

One thing to consider when buying a powder ski is that if you are a resort skier, then the powder ski also needs to perform in the afternoon of a powder day when it is mostly cut up snow that you are skiing. Even if you have a ski quiver, it may not be convenient or even possible to change skis part way through the day. This is one of the reasons why I sold my Line Prophet 115 and got an Elan 888.

post #80 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

One thing to consider when buying a powder ski is that if you are a resort skier, then the powder ski also needs to perform in the afternoon of a powder day when it is mostly cut up snow that you are skiing. Even if you have a ski quiver, it may not be convenient or even possible to change skis part way through the day. This is one of the reasons why I sold my Line Prophet 115 and got an Elan 888.



This is why DPS calls the RP112 the, RP stands for RESORT POWDER. It still handles very well in cut up snow. 

post #81 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

This is why DPS calls the RP112 the, RP stands for RESORT POWDER. It still handles very well in cut up snow. 


And for that matter, on groomers.  At least, if you put it on edge.

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