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Old Giant Slalom = today's (blank) ?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Researching new skis for my uncle.  He rides on really old skis.  When I asked what type of ski he'd be looking for, he said he used to ask for, "giant slalom" style skis.  Google is pulling up limited results of this type of ski.  Is there a new name for that type of ski now?

 

I'm taking suggestions for these type of skis too:

- My uncle is 5' 8" 210 lbs, intermediate skier  

-Stays on the run 

 

Thanks guys!

post #2 of 13

Hi - Welcome to Epic. He's looking for something that carves long radius turns on groomers, although he'd want to skid his finishes, I'd guess. And back in the day, "GS" also meant a touch wider and more stable/forgiving in crud or chop; it was what guys wanted for all mountain. How much do you look to spend? Would suggest something stable but forgiving like last season's Head Peak 78, K2 Charger (or Photon if you have a limited budget), Blizzard Magnum 7.6., Nordica Firearrow 74. 

post #3 of 13

In the 70's and 80's G.S. used to mean metal. More metal. In the 90's, the G.S. skis started to get more shape and be really fun all mountain skis, even in the east. What he is looking for is a ski with less sidecut, skis like the Kastle MX88, Volkl Kendo, Rossi Experience 98, skis with turn radius's of about 20M and above. 

post #4 of 13

No matter which modern ski you choose, it isn't going to ski like what he was used to. Unless you get him some SG skis. Side cut for a GS ski back in his day was in the 50 - 70 m range. He was also likely on a ski over 200 cm long which won't be easy to acheive with a modern, non-race ski.

 

 

post #5 of 13

many skiers who still employ heel thrust and tail slide at the end of a turn often prefer a ski with a narrow-ish tail. check the width dimensions. The larger turn radius skis don't have extreme sidecut to the tip, like 30mm or less and generally 10mm less than the tip at the tail. Dynastar, which is a favorite of lots of old school skiers, like the Legend 8800 model series or its current spawn. Less sidecut at the tail of the ski allows the skier to release it more easily.   Many skis have this property. For example, the Stockli XL is very difficult to release due to a combination of stiffness and sidecut.

post #6 of 13

They still make GS (Giant Slalom) skis, but the radius is a little smaller these days (although FIS seems to be heading back up in terms of radius of GS race skis these days). 

 

If he was a good skier on the old GS skis and skis on piste at speed, he will like a modern GS race ski.   A one-level down from race ski like D2 RACE GS from Atomic or RC4 WC RC from Fischer, or Head I.Speed would probably be a better choice though.

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

many skiers who still employ heel thrust and tail slide at the end of a turn often prefer a ski with a narrow-ish tail. check the width dimensions. The larger turn radius skis don't have extreme sidecut to the tip, like 30mm or less and generally 10mm less than the tip at the tail. Dynastar, which is a favorite of lots of old school skiers, like the Legend 8800 model series or its current spawn. Less sidecut at the tail of the ski allows the skier to release it more easily.   Many skis have this property. For example, the Stockli XL is very difficult to release due to a combination of stiffness and sidecut.


I second this,  I learned to ski in the 70's and now love my 8800's and 8000's too. 

 

royal
 

 

post #8 of 13

Check your PMs.  I have a buddy with a super minty pair of 172 Dynastar 8000s with Look PX ti bindings that might work for your Dad.  Your Dad's 5'8" and an intermediate, so that part works. 172s might work for his weight if he doesn't hit the "fast" button and just cruises around. If he likes to go fast, then he might want 178s.

post #9 of 13

Now Ghost, you often sing this tune, and I just don't buy it.smile.gif A race ski, even a non FIS race ski, is never going to allow the skier to relax. Every turn has to be perfect, the skier on it all the time, a lot of energy has to be put into every turn, the rebound kicks your ass repeatedly. Is that the way many people ski, really? I have skis like that, and at the end of a long day I'm like: ENOUGH ALREADY! YOU'VE WORN ME DOWN.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

They still make GS (Giant Slalom) skis, but the radius is a little smaller these days (although FIS seems to be heading back up in terms of radius of GS race skis these days). 

 

If he was a good skier on the old GS skis and skis on piste at speed, he will like a modern GS race ski.   A one-level down from race ski like D2 RACE GS from Atomic or RC4 WC RC from Fischer, or Head I.Speed would probably be a better choice though.



 

post #10 of 13

I would recommend the Rossignol Avenger line for a "GS" feel ski at an intermediate/advanced level.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Now Ghost, you often sing this tune, and I just don't buy it.smile.gif A race ski, even a non FIS race ski, is never going to allow the skier to relax. Every turn has to be perfect, the skier on it all the time, a lot of energy has to be put into every turn, the rebound kicks your ass repeatedly. Is that the way many people ski, really? I have skis like that, and at the end of a long day I'm like: ENOUGH ALREADY! YOU'VE WORN ME DOWN.
 



 

I'm not sure I agree with that.  While I haven't traditionally skied GS skis, I bought my first pair last year...a Hart Javelin GS (also known as the Vist SuperFront 1), and I thought in many situations they were easier to ski than my other twin tips and fatties.  They do have alot of rebound yes, but they have SOOO much edge grip.  On fatter skis, especially while skidding to a stop, you really gotta balance it all out or they wanna roll flat, which can be frustrating.  The GS skis do it just like you learned it back in the day.  Hockey stop with the quickness.  But the same goes for turning too. If you're skidding turns instead of carving them they are surprisingly quick.  I took mine down some small mine shafts (mogul fields but not world cup style), and they were delightfully quick.  And this is in a 191cm ski.  Maybe it's because it shares DNA with the F17 Mogul ski.

 

At least the gentleman in question is short at 5'8" I believe he said, he'll have lots of options if he wants a longer ski like the old ones.  But given my experience on my Javelins, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend a modern GS ski to someone who skied old ones.  Unless they want to ski powder.
 

 

post #12 of 13

Quick is good, unless you want casual and relaxed, even with some speed. Some skis, one sloppy turn and you're crashed. Some people are laughing and talking and dividing their interest between scenery and conversation all while skiing down the mountain. Or ever look over your shoulder to see where your friend or child is? Not easy on race skis, which are a great tool for focused, intense, precise skiing.

post #13 of 13

I just re-read the original post.  Intermediate Uncle stays on groomers...yeah I guess I retract my comment.  Race Skis are probably not for him.

 

But still I don't consider them difficult to ski...moreso...they are more capable.

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