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Going to a more advanced ski

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Looking to get some more advanced skis. I'm an advanced but not expert skier, mostly skiing the groomed eastern slopes, with a trip out west every couple years. I like to ski fast. I'm 5'9" and 165 lb. I was just at a store that had a couple nice looking pairs of skis, one new and one used. New pair - Dynastar Contact Cross 12 that they offered to sell me for $450 Canadian including bindings. Used - Head MPulse 5.70, 170 cm. They have some miles but they look to be in great shape and I could probably get them for a quarter of the price of the new skis.

 

How much has ski technology evolved since 2004? Also, the new skis are a 172, which is 10 cm longer than my current skis and up to about the middle of my forehead. Is that about the right length?

 

One last question. I've had my ski boots for longer than the skis and they've always been hard to get onto my feet. My toes go right to the end of the boot with no extra room and they get cold really easily. The only time my toes ever get cold is when they're in ski boots. I have a feeling that my boots never did fit properly. Any feedback on boot fit would be appreciated.

post #2 of 13

First and foremost, get new boots.  Tell your boot fitter about your issues with cold toes and he will likely find some help for you.

 

There could be some issues with your fit, like a pressure point on some place that's cutting off circulation and/or just cold boots.  Yes some boots/liners are warmer than others. 

 

Then, skis. .....Not familiar with the Head you're looking at but am a little familiar with the Dynastar Contact series, which are a really nice hard snow ski.  If groomers are what you like, then I'm betting the contact 12 is a decent ski for you.  Maybe someone who's spent time on that actual ski will see this and help you out a little more.

 

Other skis on my short list would be the Blizzard 8.1, Kastle, MX78, Rossi Experience 78, Fischer Progressor .......

there are some awesome skis out there!

post #3 of 13

Trekchick nailed it.  Forget skis until you boots that really fit your feet and be sure to get them from someone who knows how to fit them to your feet, which generally means finding an independent bootfitter.  I wasted a lot of money over the years on new hot skis and kept wondering why my skiing didn't improve.  When I finally got boots that actually fit my skiing improved dramatically and almost instantly.

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the responses. New boots will be part of the package. Where would I find a bootfitter? An independent store? Shops at a ski resort?
post #5 of 13

Whereabouts are you in Ontario?

post #6 of 13

Regarding boots, I've heard good things about Cam Powell at Squire John's in Collingwood.  Your old boots might be every bit as good as new boots, but need a little work.  I would just give Cam carte blanche; if he ruins your boots, it was worth the gamble.  A good boot fitter will tell you if it's a lost cause.

 

I'm going to go against the flow and say "Get some skis."; rental lines are a PITA.

 

Regarding the skis you mentioned, the Dynastar Contact Cross at $450. is the better deal.  As I recall Mpulse was a fairly low-level (entry) ski.  Realskiers gives the 2004 Mpulse 7.70 a pretty low rating; I don't imagine the 5.50 is any better.  With regular season full day lift tickets at blue Mountain going for $59 a pop plus tax, you don't want to be skiing on an entry level ski, unless it's your first, second, or third time of course.  Although if you really like to ski fast, you might prefer the Contact 4x4 or groove or maybe even the speed course TI.  If you're going to get a Head ski from 2004, get the WC ixrc.  (or any old head ski with SW in it's name).  You might find a subscription (twenty bucks or so) to realskiers.com worthwhile; their reviews go back a few years.

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Gunnerbob - I live in Markham (Toronto suburb for the rest of you). Ghost - what do you think of the boot fitters at Skiis and Biikes? Their Mississauga store is having a warehouse sale next week I think I'll check out. After trying on some new boots yesterday I'm positive I want new boots now. My old ones are a rigid beginner boot and I was surprised at the difference with the ones I tried on.

Re: Dynastar Contact skis - I'm still a little unsure about the difference between the Contact Cross and the Contact Limited/10/11 line. Based on what I've read on the forum they seem very similar. The Cross is 120-72-104 and the Limited/10/11 is 122-72-102. I take it that the Cross is just a bit faster and more demanding based on those numbers? The Contact 4x4 looks tempting since I like speed, but I think a step down from that would be right for me.
post #8 of 13

Yes, go to Skiis and Biikes in Mississauga!  That's where I live, I went to one of their clearance sales and they had some phenomenal deals on 2011 products, still in the package. I picked up a set of Contact 4x4 (178cm) and was considering the Cross but I wanted something that I could push harder and grow into.

 

They also have a few boot fitters there, one in particular is awesome.  Send me a PM and I can give you detailed contact info if you want.

 

Getting your own gear isn't cheap, but look at it as an investment....in your ability, in your fun, and in your health and safety.  Sounds like you're at the point where you should definitely be investing in your own gear.  Find good deals, look around, and you'll be happier.  It'll make a world of difference from rentals.

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
I already have my own gear, it's just not meeting my needs anymore! I sent you a pm, thanks for the info.
post #10 of 13

I'm not familiar with the contact limited, although you might find some reviews on it as a contact 11; they were reportedly the same except for the top sheet at one point in time some years ago.  Generally speaking the longer turn radius will do better at speed and the shorter turn radius (bigger tip and tail) will do better at making tight turns at slower speeds.

 

Also sorry,  but I don't know enough about the boot fitters at skis and bikes either.

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
I ended up getting a pair of Dynastar Contact Cross in 172. Thanks for the advice. Now I just need to get boots. So can we just skip fall and go straight into winter?
post #12 of 13

I like that idea!  Bring on the snow......

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Regarding boots, I've heard good things about Cam Powell at Squire John's in Collingwood.  Your old boots might be every bit as good as new boots, but need a little work.  I would just give Cam carte blanche; if he ruins your boots, it was worth the gamble.  A good boot fitter will tell you if it's a lost cause.

 

I'm going to go against the flow and say "Get some skis."; rental lines are a PITA.

 

Regarding the skis you mentioned, the Dynastar Contact Cross at $450. is the better deal.  As I recall Mpulse was a fairly low-level (entry) ski.  Realskiers gives the 2004 Mpulse 7.70 a pretty low rating; I don't imagine the 5.50 is any better.  With regular season full day lift tickets at blue Mountain going for $59 a pop plus tax, you don't want to be skiing on an entry level ski, unless it's your first, second, or third time of course.  Although if you really like to ski fast, you might prefer the Contact 4x4 or groove or maybe even the speed course TI.  If you're going to get a Head ski from 2004, get the WC ixrc.  (or any old head ski with SW in it's name).  You might find a subscription (twenty bucks or so) to realskiers.com worthwhile; their reviews go back a few years.



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister F View Post

I ended up getting a pair of Dynastar Contact Cross in 172. Thanks for the advice. Now I just need to get boots. So can we just skip fall and go straight into winter?

Ghost is a pretty solid member with some credibility here.  You may want to contact him and see if he can steer you in the right direction on boots.  As he said, your boots may be fine, just need to be fitted properly.  Try that and see what a good boot fitter says.

 

 

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