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At what sidecut radius does cruising the CAT-tracks become not scary (srs)??? - Page 2

post #31 of 45

Nice pics   -  I'm going to guess The Canyons on the top, with Big Sky in the middle.  I'm probably waay off, right?

 

(EDIT-Nice job telerod  now my post is on another page entirely.)

post #32 of 45

Your post would still be on page two. Haha

post #33 of 45

Another thing you could do is skate.  I tend to do this a bit on the really flat cat track we do have but it is usually because  I always feel like a salmon going upstream on this one and skating is inevitable.  I think the slope goes from the trail I'm trying to get to back to where I came from.   It also tend to get small branches and assorted tree crap on it and I spend a bit of time weaving in and out of stuff.

 

I also agree with being on edge as often as possible for control.  If you're with kids skating might not work.  Being on edge or skating is just beating what the ski is going to do anyway to the punch.   There is still something that needs correcting.

 

Ken

post #34 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post

Nice pics   -  I'm going to guess The Canyons on the top, with Big Sky in the middle.  I'm probably waay off, right?

 

(EDIT-Nice job telerod  now my post is on another page entirely.)



Haha, kinda... both pics are actually the same cat-track at Winter Park, one before the bridge, one right after. ski.gif

post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoredAtBMBW View Post

 



 

For me, 15 and 16 meters do this.  I wondered if 21 or 24 would not do this....  I suppose the question is futile and demoing next time I'm at a cat-track-heavy resort is the best thing to do.

 

Center your weight, less forward pressure
 

 

post #36 of 45
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the suggestions on keeping the ski on edge.  I always do this everywhere, and found I must do this on cattracks to prevent my issues.  However, sometimes on cattracks I want to lean back and take in the sun, and not worry about getting shot into the trees or off a ledge...

 

 

And classic epicski thread... some say lean forward, others say lean back...  well, no matter which way I lean I'm going to get a microjet tune on my skis and then leave the base edge the hell alone this year... that is for sure.  And though inevitably enough hard-carving will  reconvexify them, so perhaps an in-season microjet grind will be in order.  

post #37 of 45

If you're grinding the base, consider a different tune.  one / two maybe.

post #38 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

If you're grinding the base, consider a different tune.  one / two maybe.



I prefer 1/3, so I don't edge out, and so I can hold good bite.  If it is my one crappy pair of skis, however, I run those at 1/2 anyway because their torsional flaccidity negates some of the benefit of a 1/3.

 

If I get a base grind (which is part of the microjet "tune" package at my local shop) why wouldn't I want to run 1/3???

post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

If you're grinding the base, consider a different tune.  one / two maybe.



eh the first number would matter more than the second.....

 

trust me one 2/5 skis are alot less catchy than my 1/3 skis. My 3 degree base bevel skis practically never catch.

 

 

post #40 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post





eh the first number would matter more than the second.....

 

trust me one 2/5 skis are alot less catchy than my 1/3 skis. My 3 degree base bevel skis practically never catch.

 

 


Oh my, I can't imagine that much base bevel... how does it work for all-mountain cruising (including groomers)?

 

post #41 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoredAtBMBW View Post




Oh my, I can't imagine that much base bevel... how does it work for all-mountain cruising (including groomers)?

 


 

quite honestly I think people take their base bevel number way to serious and do not want to experiment with super high base bevels.

 

first you to realize I have optimial setup for skiing off trail and truly can ski off trail all day long. I ditch people when they can not anymore, its way to dangerous to freeski alot of groomers.

 

not a groomer but early morning hard snow off trail. the ski with a 2 degree base/4 degree side hooks up fine on the hardest of 'snow" its also rockered in the tip and tail. I have gold medaled at the stowe Nastar on 98mm skis with 2 degree of base bevel and rocker. It only nastar but i think that speaks volumes on how much fatter ski with lots of base bevel do not suck at what people think they should suck at.

 

225752_10150247620561138_540901137_9324871_8267569_n.jpg

 

IMO its easy to set an edge but being able to feather that edge is MUCH more difficult. I am also quite lazy and when skiing off trail hate when my sksi are sliding sideways on some soft snow and then get caught on hardsnow underneath.

 

post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoredAtBMBW View Post

I am tired of cruising on flat long cattracks and having squirrely teen-radius skis flirting with a hook-up that'll send me into the woods.



Ski on your edges, not your bases, and this problem will go away.

 

The only time my skis are flat are when I'm standing in the lift line or when I'm doing the Nordic thing.

 

post #43 of 45

If the mountain you generally ski is very spread out, causing lots of extensive cross resort skiing to get to various venues, to have to keep a ski on edge, turning, is a PITA.

 

FWIW, I would never have a daily driver that wouldn't track straight, true, and quick. Currently, new condition 08 Legend Pro Rider, like a Super G ski, 26m. So, so much fun.

 

edit for positive content


Edited by davluri - 9/8/11 at 9:57am
post #44 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

If the mountain you generally ski is very spread out, causing lots of extensive cross resort skiing to get to various venues, to have to keep a ski on edge, turning, is a PITA. You put up with it if you are digging on short radius carved turns, but then take the bad with the good, no reason to complain nonono2.gif, you could see that coming.



Your first reply was more inspiring, and I am going to experiment with straighter skis ASAP.

post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post





Ski on your edges, not your bases, and this problem will go away.

 

The only time my skis are flat are when I'm standing in the lift line or when I'm doing the Nordic thing.

 




flat skis are faster

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