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Taking toddlers on ski vacations.

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
Hs anyone done this with success? I have a 16month old. I'd like to take the wife out west tis winter, but do not want her to spend the whole time chasing the little one. Wife doesn't ski (yet) by the way and has never been to a ski town.

I do plan on taking just the wife to Deer Valley in February. But wouldn't mind going again, somewhere else, with the baby. Do any areas have really good daycare programs? I dont want to just dump my child in a room with a gazillion other kids and not enough staff.

What about evening baby sitters.

And right now probably our biggest challenge is flying with her. Yeah, it's nice to not have to pay, but if there are no empty seats on the plane, and she has to sit in our laps, it's next to impossible, she is not a lap child.

I may be reaching trying to do this, this year....
post #2 of 32

It'll be *much* easier the following year in terms of day care, etc. when your 16 month old is nearly 2 1/2.  You'll have to buy her a plane ticket, though, but at least you'll be out of hover-near-them-while-they-walk-or-run-because-they're-going-to-fall-and-get-hurt mode... which, personally during that time I wouldn't have trusted many strangers to watch after my kid.  A year later, no big deal as she's so much bigger, more stable and independent.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post

I may be reaching trying to do this, this year....


 

post #3 of 32

 

Quote:

Taking toddlers on ski vacations.

nonono2.gif

 

Toddlers are a royal pain on planes, trains, and automobiles.  It gets even worse when you actually arrive at the resort.  Why not focus your free time on activities that you can actually do with the children for now.  In a couple of years they will be old enough to travel easier and do half day ski lessons while you get your fix.  Then you can actually ski with them in the afternoons.

 

If you need an core ski fix, leave the kid with the grandparents for a short weekend here and there or take turns going solo with friends while spouse stays back with the kids.  Just saying that when the kid totally ruins your thousands dollar ski vacation it can be difficult to smile.

 

I know this sounds harsh, but is is what I would recommend from experience. 

post #4 of 32

My wife and I went through this.  It seems to boil down to your priorities and pocketbook.  At least in Tahoe, there are nanny services and plenty of independent babysitters.  Many ski instructors and coaches are happy to babysit, as the pay is better.  Finding these people may be a bit tricky if you don't have a foot on the ground.

 

Anyway, if you want to free up six hours of adult ski time, and are willing to pay for it, you can do it.  You may feel guilty and the kid may not like it, but you can make the choice.

post #5 of 32

We took our kids everywhere.  Sometimes it's a hassle, sometimes it costs a lot and sometimes the memories will last forever!

post #6 of 32

Nothing to add to the above about the +/- of taking your toddler.  However if you do decide to bring him/her along I would highly recommend springing for the extra seat when traveling with a child of any age (pocketbook allowing).  With the current airline climate, empty seats are the exception rather than the rule.  I have been flying with my daughter since she was an infant (now 6, both sets of grandparents live far away) and she has always been a great traveler - but if she had been forced to sit in Mom/Dad's lap there WOULD have been trouble.  Just remember to bring plenty of crayons/coloring books/picture books - and load the ipod/iphone with her favorite shows.

post #7 of 32

When I have flown with a "lap" child, I don't recall much actual lap time.  Of course, there's takeoff and landing and turbulence, when the kid's not going to be very happy regardless.  The rest of the time, we went up and down the aisles over and over again, getting well acquainted with the flight attendants.  I spent a lot of time standing in the back bouncing little ones to sleep.  Once they're asleep, then they're good on the lap.  That was my experience, anyway.

post #8 of 32

Also, some airlines have a policy where if you buy a seat for a small child and the flight isn't booked full, you'll get a refund or 1/2 off the ticket price, or credit for a future flight.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alveolus View Post

Nothing to add to the above about the +/- of taking your toddler.  However if you do decide to bring him/her along I would highly recommend springing for the extra seat when traveling with a child of any age (pocketbook allowing).  With the current airline climate, empty seats are the exception rather than the rule.  I have been flying with my daughter since she was an infant (now 6, both sets of grandparents live far away) and she has always been a great traveler - but if she had been forced to sit in Mom/Dad's lap there WOULD have been trouble.  Just remember to bring plenty of crayons/coloring books/picture books - and load the ipod/iphone with her favorite shows.



 

post #9 of 32

We did this once a while ago. Not into the whole babysitter thing so we did it with another couple.

Every day one of us skied with the other couple until noon then came back and traded babysitting while the other went skiing.

You can get a lot in in 1/2 day if you know that's all. Plus no wasted time for lunch break.

 

The tag team thing pretty much killed the other folks.

post #10 of 32
Do it! We had good experiences with many ski resort day cares - more specifically, there were none that I would NOT recommend. Unless the kid is screaming through an entire flight or a dinner out (usually hard to predict), most people are helpful knowing that you're travelling with small kids. My favorite was getting to move ahead of a LONG customs/immigration line going to Whistler (sorry and thanks to everyone else in line). And if I'm honest, I'll admit that my young kids were probably much more patient dealing with travel issues/delays than I am/was. You'll have to adjust in some ways - getting up earlier to get them to daycare, if you choose to go that route, earlier dinners, earlier to bed...but that sure beats not skiing.

And the sooner you start them on such trips and adventures, the sooner they'll accept it as normal.
post #11 of 32


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevesmith7 View Post

We did this once a while ago. Not into the whole babysitter thing so we did it with another couple.

Every day one of us skied with the other couple until noon then came back and traded babysitting while the other went skiing.

You can get a lot in in 1/2 day if you know that's all. Plus no wasted time for lunch break.

 

The tag team thing pretty much killed the other folks.



Excellent plan!



Quote:
Originally Posted by SKI-3PO View Post


And the sooner you start them on such trips and adventures, the sooner they'll accept it as normal.


I agree with this after they are are fully potty trained-actually really really potty trained, but not so much for "toddlers".  Before then their little metabolisms really make long trips cumbersome and way more time consuming.  Once they get over that little hurdle they can be quite the little road warriors. But, keep a bucket within reach on car trips for motion sickness.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by jaytierney View Post

Also, some airlines have a policy where if you buy a seat for a small child and the flight isn't booked full, you'll get a refund or 1/2 off the ticket price, or credit for a future flight.
 

 

And some will kick you off the flight if your child isn't quiet enough.mad.gif
 

It is "doable", but keep expectations very low (be prepared for the entire thing to be a washout) if you bring children under age 4.  And, most importantly, don't get angry with them if that happens.

post #12 of 32
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I think in my own enthusiasm I was trying to find a way to make it work. It just won't. She has not done well flying since she could walk. She just can't sit in our lap for a 2nd flight much less a 3 to 4 hr cross country jaunt.

It will just have to wait. One of the main reasons I'm learning to ski, is to be able to have an activity we can all do together. Unfortunately no family in town to watch her, so I have to fly the mil in. Oh well, Good things come to those who wait....

Thanks for the advice. Maybe next year.
post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post


I agree with this after they are are fully potty trained-actually really really potty trained, but not so much for "toddlers".  Before then their little metabolisms really make long trips cumbersome and way more time consuming.  Once they get over that little hurdle they can be quite the little road warriors. But, keep a bucket within reach on car trips for motion sickness.


I'll disagree with this one - especially on car trips. You have far more control of when you're going to stop with a kid wearing a diaper.

Obviously every kid is different and it sounds like WC is making the best decision for his kid/family.
post #14 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SKI-3PO View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post


I agree with this after they are are fully potty trained-actually really really potty trained, but not so much for "toddlers".  Before then their little metabolisms really make long trips cumbersome and way more time consuming.  Once they get over that little hurdle they can be quite the little road warriors. But, keep a bucket within reach on car trips for motion sickness.


I'll disagree with this one - especially on car trips. You have far more control of when you're going to stop with a kid wearing a diaper.

Obviously every kid is different and it sounds like WC is making the best decision for his and everyone else that flys, sanity.
Fixed


Haha
Funny thing is, I have no doubt that in 5 yrs this kid will be skiing better than me, she is hell on wheels.
post #15 of 32

Watch out for rapid altitude changes, though at 16 months that might not be an issue anymore.

post #16 of 32
Thread Starter 
Yeah, thanks prickly.

Gonna wait a bit. It's unfortunate, because I have a friend who's family lives in whitefish and would have a free place to stay but it's the wife's friend so we would all have to go.

Would it be wrong to give a toddler ambien?
post #17 of 32

Probably OK if you're the parent, but...

 

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/11/12/national/main583311.shtml

post #18 of 32

I highly recomend you go. We brought our 4 kids, the youngest being 2, out to Bridger last year. We drove though. Our youngest went to the playcare program half a day, skied half the day, I was pretty leary about it but it was a lot of fun. Our kids have been to alot of places like Disney World, SeaWorld, ect. but they still talk about that trip as being there favorite. As a parent skiing with small kids you just have to remember that you wont have full run of the mountain, you will be at slower pace, but just enjoy being out in a fun enviroment, skiing some of the greens and light blues last year with our kids was the most fun I'd had skiing in a long time. Me and my wife checked out the playcare program at Whitefish last year and looks like fun for little ones to. If you dont go you will never know how it turns out and you wont be able to do it again.

post #19 of 32
Thread Starter 
Again, she was unmanageable on a flight that was 1 1/2 hrs. I can't imagine 2 flights over 2 hours just to get to Montana. Next year she will be close to three in February and probably be easier to fly with.
If she were an infant, no problem.
post #20 of 32

When my daughter was young and we had to lug my daughter, I hit Kaybee toys, loaded up on JUNK that was like a buck a piece or less and every time she was bored, I said, "Hey, look what mom's got!" and pulled out a new toy.  We did the Caribbean from NJ a few times AND flew NJ to CO as well.  By the time she was seven it was just with one parent. 

post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post


Would it be wrong to give a toddler ambien?
 


At that age we called it "benidryl".  Your doc can recommend the correct dose based on the kid's weight..

 

post #22 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post

Probably OK if you're the parent, but...

 

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/11/12/national/main583311.shtml

Excellent! So XANAX is safe.
post #23 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post




At that age we called it "benidryl".  Your doc can recommend the correct dose based on the kid's weight..

 


Yep. I did that for her last flight, buti gave it to her too late. After throwing a fit for an hour, she fell asleep right before we landed..lol.

Hey Cr. Your in NC too. Want to babysit for a week this winter?
post #24 of 32


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post

Hey Cr. Your in NC too. Want to babysit for a week this winter?

I just put WC68 on ignoretongue.gif

ROTF.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

OK not really haha.  I would help good a friend in a real emergency situation, but something of that magnitude better include a reciprocal arrangement.

 

We're in Durham BTW.
 

 

post #25 of 32

My kids fly a lot (not alone, of course).  Basically, we determined that flying 2-3 times per year for 5+ hours each was part of what our family does.  We decided that, happy or not, the kids needed to get used to it.  As difficult as it seems, I believe that the earlier one starts, the better in the long run.  In our family, this logic for flying also applies to skiing.

 

I remember one flight from San Francisco to Seattle.  My younger daughter (who had started flying at 2 months) was around 3.  She spent every minute on the plane yelling "Let me out!"  She's 5 now.  Last week we did a 5 hour flight with no issues at all.

 

Definitely do the sack-o-junky-toys.  Pair it with the sack-o-junky-food.  We've done the Benadryl with my older one.  It makes her drowsy and also reduces the amount of puke on her clothes.

 

My wife has a simple rule for flying with kids: no changing planes if possible.  The long flights can be better in that there's more time you can be up and about.

post #26 of 32

We took our daughter on a 5+ hour flight to Kauai last December.  She was perfectly behaved the entire time.  The key?  Portable DVD player - worth every penny.

post #27 of 32

How easy it will be depends on the kid.

post #28 of 32
Thread Starter 
Hey Cr. Durham to Charlotte and back is only about 5hrs. Very doable for you.


I'm glad everyone h had success flying with their kids, but right now, at the stage she is in it's not good. And she has traveled by plane about 6 times since she was born. But right now, it's hard.

She doesn't watch tv much, so my wife loaded some kids shows on her iPad for their last trip. My daughter threw a fit and flung the iPad across the aisle smashing it. She just cannot sit still right now. When her feet hit the floor she is running. She does fine strolling places where she can see new things, but her attention span is severly limited. Personally, I choose not subject other passengers or ourselves to it unless necessary.

She is not a bad child, but I think this phase is hard. In a year I'm sure it will be better.

The "let me out" thing is hilarious. If ours could talk, Id love to hear what she is saying.
post #29 of 32

If it makes you feel better, the same daughter who was perfectly behaved on the flight to Kauai was a trainwreck a year earlier (around the age of your daughter) on a flight to Denver.  It definitely gets easier once you can really communicate with them.

post #30 of 32
Thread Starter 

Here is a sample of our little defiant one...the wife prayed for a "spirited child".

 

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