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New Photo Toy, (Non-Skiing)

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

 

We caught a lucky break around here when Hurricane Irene gave us nothing more than a brush pass on her way north, before subjecting our neighbors up that way to some serious trouble. Trust that the Bears in the northeast escaped with a minimum of distress and damage. We’ve been through many hurricanes and know that they are nothing to be trifled with or underestimated.

 

Posting this TR may seem a bit frivolous at this time, but I figure that it might bring someone a smile or two, so here goes:

 

Seas have been pretty rough around here, so the poor visibility underwater has had me spend much of my time shooting close-up photography. I recently picked up a close-up diopter for my housed camera, and saw fit to do some experimenting with the new tool. Not to get too involved technically, but all of the images here were made with my Nikon D2X camera, a Micro Nikkor 105mm lens, (and unless otherwise noted, the lens was used in conjunction with the aforementioned diopter,) and a pair of Inon strobes. The Micro-Nikkor is what is generally referred to as a “macro lens”, and is ideally suited for making images of small subjects at close range. The added magnification of the diopter increases the reproduction size of the subject and enters the realm of “super-macro.”

 

There are some very specific parameters that you’ve got to accept before trying to use such a rig to make images. First off, the depth of field is exceedingly shallow, so focus must be spot on. Secondly, you must get extremely close, (within 6 inches,) of your subject, so attempting to photograph skittish subjects is an exercise in futility. So essentially you’ve got to find subjects that are stationary or completely fearless. Trying to photograph a small critter that is swimming is supremely difficult. (Think dropping Corbet’s Couloir and skiing it smoothly in white-out conditions. Switch.) That’s why I’m so pleased with the pair of images that I’m including of the Glass Goby.

 

Just to illustrate the magnifying power of the diopter, this first image of Fleshy Stony Coral was made with the 105mm lens alone, and the second was made with my new toy attached.

Kulick-11-08-01-121.jpg

 

Kulick-11-08-01-119.jpg

The first mobile critter that I attempted to shoot was this Yellowline Arrow Crab.

Kulick-11-08-01-045.jpg

 

Next up is this Pederson Cleaner Shrimp.

Kulick-11-08-01-053.jpg

 

Banded Coral Shrimp.

Kulick-11-08-02-129.jpg

 

Next, something a bit more mobile, a Roughhead Blenny peering out of a small worm-hole.

 

Kulick-11-08-02-035.jpg

 

A shot without the diopter of a pair of Neon Gobies.

Kulick-11-08-03-072.jpg

 

Portrait of a Neon Goby in its’ den. Note the small tube-dwelling worms, (those feathery looking things,) just above the fish’s head.

 

Kulick-11-08-03-090.jpg

 

Front end, or “face” of a Flamingo Tongue Cowrie.

 

Kulick-11-08-03-214.jpg

 

A tiny Mantis Shrimp pokes its’ head from within its’ burrow.

 

Kulick-11-08-18-177.jpg

 

Portrait of a female Sailfin Blenny.

 

Kulick-11-08-18-197.jpg

 

The images of a Glass Goby that were the most demanding to make. (Either that or the ones that involved the most luck.)

 

Kulick-11-08-18-200.jpg

 

Kulick-11-08-18-212.jpg

 

In the immortal words of Porky Pig:

"That's all folks."

 

post #2 of 10
Fascinating, as usual!
post #3 of 10

Incredible pictures....as usual.  Were they taken on local waters?

post #4 of 10

Awe inspiring as usual.

 

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

Fascinating, as usual!

Thank you, as usual.
 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by cstreu1026 View Post

Incredible pictures....as usual.  Were they taken on local waters?

Thank you too, as usual. Yes indeed, all of the images were made within two miles of the Miami coast. When the sea is rough, I try not to venture too far, especially when I'm using my own boat, which is pretty small.
 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Awe inspiring as usual.

 

And once again, Thank you. Didn't know it was so much fun to be usual.
 

 

post #6 of 10

I think I need to come visit its been too long since I have been in the water (October 2009) but I really fell in love with macro photography on the last trip to Bonaire.  I finally got a half way decent shot and I am hooked.  This was taken with a Sea Life point and shoot setup.  I would love to have something like your set up I just don't dive enough to justify the huge expense.

 

PICT7178.jpg

post #7 of 10

Gorgeous pictures.  I don't dive as much as I used too, but I spent a lot of time diving around Ft. Lauderdale.  My high point was three months spent touring the Bahamas in a 27ft. Albury.

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazzer View Post


 

 

 

 



And once again, Thank you. Didn't know it was so much fun to be usual.
 

 


With you, usual is a relative term.  Your usual is quite unusual, which is usually quite spectacular!

 

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cstreu1026 View Post

I think I need to come visit its been too long since I have been in the water (October 2009) but I really fell in love with macro photography on the last trip to Bonaire.  I finally got a half way decent shot and I am hooked.  This was taken with a Sea Life point and shoot setup.  I would love to have something like your set up I just don't dive enough to justify the huge expense.

 

PICT7178.jpg


Nice find and photo of the Spotted Cleaner Shrimp and Anemone. U/W photography can indeed get quite pricy very quickly. If you do have a hankering to upgrade your gear, there is a flood of used first and second generation digital cameras and housings available. While not cheap, these items can be had for a small fraction of their original cost. GIf you feel like throwing some money into the ocean, give a yell or drop me a PM and I'll see if I can't find you some kit.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

Gorgeous pictures.  I don't dive as much as I used too, but I spent a lot of time diving around Ft. Lauderdale.  My high point was three months spent touring the Bahamas in a 27ft. Albury.


Glad you like the images. Give a yell if you're unfortunate enough to find yourself around here. We'll see if we can't arrange to jump into the sea.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post




With you, usual is a relative term.  Your usual is quite unusual, which is usually quite spectacular!

 

biggrin.gif
 

 

post #10 of 10

Breathtaking detail!  Might be fun to caption some of these..

 

350x700px-LL-fc3e83b8_Kulick-11-08-01-045.jpeg

 

"Nothing to see here, move right along"...

"Doesn't he know I'm invisible??"

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