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East Coast Skiers - Don't you wish......

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Irene were a snow storm!?

 

Seriously,  What if Irene were a snow storm?

I'm no scientist so I'm hoping someone will give me a good comparison.

 

post #2 of 20

I am a scientist by training, so here goes: Forecasts are predicting 4 inches or more of rain from Irene (see, e.g., http://www.accuweather.com/blogs/news/story/54201/expected-wind-rain-surge-with.asp). Those are mostly in coastal areas rather than inland where the ski areas are, but for the sake of argument let's just use 4 inches as the rainfall (my nearest ski area is expecting 5 inches over the weekend - http://www.wunderground.com/US/PA/065.html#FLO). Roughly speaking, the Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) is that 1 inch of rainfall contains as much water as 1 foot of snow, highly dependent on the nature of the snow, of course (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow#Density). Therefore Irene will be dumping approximately as much water as 4 feet of snow to the area.

 

So yes, we do wish this were a snowstorm!

 

post #3 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Irene were a snow storm!?

 

Seriously,  What if Irene were a snow storm?

I'm no scientist so I'm hoping someone will give me a good comparison.

 


not really 8 feet of snow in august would be quite a mess and unskiable by the next day. :P

 

Let hope for no snow till December, and that when it start it actually keep going so we can get a base. I do not want it to snow untill I can ski.

 

post #4 of 20

We've been keeping a pretty close eye on the Irene situation (sure hope jgiddyup is safe and sound) and for some areas they're expecting to get more than a foot of rain.  Incomprehensible!

post #5 of 20


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




not really 8 feet of snow in august would be quite a mess and unskiable by the next day. :P

 

 

And we wouldn't be able to get to the mountains, since none of the snowplows are ready to use.  Not even in a Subaru.  Talk about frustration!
 

 

post #6 of 20

I have never seen so much water! Tornado warnings too, though so far not near me exactly. It sucks that it is night out because you just can't see what's going on. Like a monster in the dark. We're just West of Philly and well above the Schuylkill so we're getting mostly rain and some wind. East and to the Jersey Shore must be pretty bad but won't know til morning how bad. Going to flood like crazy everywhere tonight and tomorrow. Should be pretty freaky in NYC and Long Island even if the winds don't strengthen. Figuring our power has to go out sometime soon too, which will suck. At least the snow was pretty when we got 4 feet of it. Of course it wasn't too pretty 3 weeks later!

post #7 of 20

Looks like upstate NY (Albany), VT and the rest of New England (especially the inland areas) are going to get a ton of rain before Irene is over with.  http://www.accuweather.com/blogs/news/story/54333/hurricane-irenes-legacy-may-be.asp

 

As I sit here typing, I'm somewhat surprised that I still have power and internet service.  My lilac tree in the front yard is down, I might still be able to prop it back up and save it once the storm has passed. However, the worst is still yet to come.  If no more trees fall, and my basement doesn't flood, I'm going to chalk this one up as a big win from my personal perspective. 

 

I hope the coastal cities/communities, and the folks on inland rivers and lakes (Lake Champlain already experienced historic flooding this year) come out of this one relatively okay.

 

STE

post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 

I saw this link on Facebook and thought that it would be appreciated by you all.....its a Photo blog  of a Bear about surfing the streets of Burlington Vermont.  

Hope Stowe is blessed with this kind of winter precip this coming season.

http://www.famousinternetskiers.com/surfing-the-flood/

post #9 of 20

I think it's safe to assume that TC's OP assumes it's winter....duhhh!

 

This month, Philly recorded the most rain ever in a single month, 13 inches prior to Irene, 19 following yesterday. During a cold January, assume 4 to 6 inches of snow per inch of water, so we would be approaching 120 inches. The track Irene took is the classic track of the winter "noreaster" storms that just dump all the way into No. Vt.

 

After 2 days of prep, listening to the hype and a night getting rid of some basement water, which is something I never had prior to Irene, I'm just tired and can't even think about skiing. Very, very thankful the storm did not live up to it's potential!

 

A time to every season.

 

Quick Edit: I got very lucky and just had a small amount of water in an unfinished section. Removed about 200 gal. using a wet-vac and hauling the water outside. A 4 hour cardio workout.

 

 


Edited by Living Proof - 8/28/11 at 9:46am
post #10 of 20

Living Proof,

 

Sorry about the basement.  Flooded basements suck.  We have a finished basement, and it got flooded three years ago.  Buddy of mine and I had to take all of the carpet/pad to the dump, cut the drywall up to 2 ft off the floor, and get rid of all of the soaked insulation (took me 2 weeks and 5 trips to the dump with a fully loaded pickup truck to get rid of everything).  Even though my buddy and I did the demo ourselves, it cost more to refinish than my homeowner's insurance would pay.  Replaced the carpet with tile, so I won't have to deal with ruined carpet down there again.

 

My wife and I have been considering buying a backup generator to power the sump (and other stuff), but haven't pulled the trigger yet (we also considered getting a battery backup for the sump, but didn't act on that wise notion either).  If we get into trouble today, I've got a bilge pump and a marine battery ready.  Won't be necessary so long as my power doesn't go out (so far, so good).  However, my Mom and Sister have both lost power, if my Mom's basement starts to flood, I'll be headed over there.  My sister has a backup generator, so she should be fine.

 

To all the folks in NY and New England, stay dry and safe.

 

STE

post #11 of 20

Going to be a lot of flooding. That was a ridiculous amount of rain. Really can't stand the media coverage of these things, but that is a whole 'nother thread for another time, since I can't stand media coverage of most things!

post #12 of 20

It would be a hellalotta snow. But thinking so is just beer talk.

 

Midstate VT took a pounding and the Killington access road is sorta gone baby gone.

 

We fared pretty well here in CT, although there is a new feature for the kids to play with

in the pool.

 

0828111523.jpg

 

 

post #13 of 20

It would be a hellalotta snow. But thinking so is just beer talk.

 

Midstate VT took a pounding and the Killington access road is sorta gone baby gone.

 

We fared pretty well here in CT, although there is a new feature for the kids to play with

in the pool.

 

0828111523.jpg

 

 

post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 

Allison that is an awesome bridge you built over your pool! duck.gif

Like skitheEast said....

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ski the East View Post

Looks like upstate NY (Albany), VT and the rest of New England (especially the inland areas) are going to get a ton of rain before Irene is over with.  http://www.accuweather.com/blogs/news/story/54333/hurricane-irenes-legacy-may-be.asp

 

What amazes me with all the media coverage is that Vermont(not a coastal state) took a bigger beating and we aren't seeing much, if any, national media coverage.

 

But here's some significant news about Killington.  I understand that Killington was planning on replacing it anyway, but Yowza, this was probably not in their plans!

News was that the water was 7 ft above the high water mark in parts of Vermont! eek.gif

http://rutlandherald.typepad.com/vermonttoday/2011/08/killington-base-lodge-collapses-photo.html

 

 

Killington Base Lodge collapses - photo

From a reader:

Killington

 

 

post #15 of 20

Hey TC-- great (or equally seriously disturbed) minds think alike. I posted my rant in the Killington lodge thread. I wasn't going to rant but now that all you can find are pictures of small town devastation and flooding I just got so annoyed. The rant really should be here so I copied... forgive me.

 

Wow. Scary stuff. Good thing all those weather people were camped out on the coast so we could see all their jackets blowing, when the real damage of this storm is going to be from the massive amount of rain and inland flooding of every single waterway. One of the weather sites that I seek out when I actually want facts and non-hyperbolic opinion was saying at least two days ahead of time that the likelihood of massive flooding of the NY transit system from the storm surge was 20 percent or less. Substantial and scary, yes, but hardly the certainty that you would thought from watching the weather "news". I live pretty high up above the Schuylkill, so I knew I wouldn't have issues at my property, but there is a lot of flooding around our area.  Not that they shouldn't have prepared the coastline, but they knew for at least a day or two that the MOST LIKELY lasting impact was going to be the size of the storm and the massive rainfall on already saturated ground leading to enormous amounts of inland flooding, and they really buried that lead because it just isn't nearly as dramatic to watch a small tributary slowly rise and overwhelm a small town as it is to stand watch waiting for the New York City subway system to flood, or to stand on an evacuated boardwalk hoping to get a dramatic shot of a reporter running away from a wave that they are telling everyone else that they shouldn't be anywhere near. Of course, now they are all running to find shots of flooded streets, destroyed small bridges, and homes under water. I have spent a lot of time in New England over the years and I feel for all the folks who are in those beautiful iconic towns with lovely rivers who are just getting slammed by the aftermath of this storm. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 

What amazes me with all the media coverage is that Vermont(not a coastal state) took a bigger beating and we aren't seeing much, if any, national media coverage.

 

 

post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 

Ken, check this out!!  Actually every one can watch it but Ken will especially appreciate it.

 

!

post #17 of 20

I got nothing. 

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Living Proof View Post


Quick Edit: I got very lucky and just had a small amount of water in an unfinished section. Removed about 200 gal. using a wet-vac and hauling the water outside. A 4 hour cardio workout.

 

 


I got about the same amount in my basement, but I'm concerned some of it got under a subfloor. 

 

post #19 of 20

Wow, the pictures from VT are something.  The water is so tightly channeled and has so much energy from its downhill descent that it undercuts and collapses roads/pavement/buildings with ease.

 

They're closing some farily large/substantial bridges over the Hudson and Mohawk rivers here in NY.  I've heard that Keene (near Whiteface) and Windham NY are among the hardest hit communities in New York. 

 

I wasn't able to save our lilac tree, but the basement didn't flood and we got off pretty easy.  However it looks like our town's municipal water supply may be compromised if a dam on the Mohawk River fails (they're trying to repair it).  That could make for some fun times.  Fortunately, there are showers at my work.

 

I hope everyone in VT is safe and unharmed.

 

STE

post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by keniski View Post

I got nothing. 


I keep trying to write something that can accurately summarize the simultaneous feelings of sadness and the sense of powerlessness that these events leave me with. A lot of it also has to do with the circumstances of the people affected. People who live along the coasts and along the large midwestern rivers understand the realities of the places they live, just like people who live in California understand the risk of earthquakes. There are plans that chest-thumping politicians can order into effect, and self-congratulatory media can show lots of statistics and storm categories and flood stages and dramatic visuals, and then afterward talk about how effective their plans and responses were so that they can garner ratings and win re-election.

 

The regions that were most affected by this storm are places that do not expect these kinds of events, and do not have these kind of plans. Sure those mountain rivers can rise and occasionally spill over, but widespread, massive, destructive flooding from a storm like this is just not a foreseeable event for these communities. It seems like the troubles of Vermont and upstate New York are barely in the national consciousness now, just days afterward. Already the lead on CNN.com is about the the political ramifications of disaster-relief funding. I shudder to imagine the kind of political and economic issues that will continue for these mostly small communities long after the rest of the country has moved on.

 

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