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Please Take A Look At My Videos and Provide Candid Advice

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

Two years ago at Snowbasin with about 8 inches of soft stuff on top of hardpack.  Buddies tell me I've improved a lot since then (skied about 90 additional days in two years so I hope so!) and I think my hands are further forward and I'm more forward and more balanced but these are the only video clips I've got to share right now (and all I'm thinking of is skiing it seems).  Please let me know what my major areas of focus should be for improvement (btw, I am planning to go to a camp this coming season).  Thanks.

post #2 of 26
Thread Starter 

Anyone, anyone?

post #3 of 26

Hi Bumps,

 

To me you need to focus on movment.  Specifically the ability to flex/extend the ankle, knee, and hip.  Currently you have a static stance that is aft for the conditions in the video.  Ironically the one spot it looks ok is the split second where the second video "still cover pic is". 

 

Focus on extending the the joints together, this will bring your weight forward.  Generally, for now think of extending through the transition to the fall line.  Then focus on flexing the joints together throught to turn completion.  Likley you will reach maximum extension in the top third of the turn, that is ok, be patient, hold it, dont start flexing until you hit the fall line. 

 

When flexing think of keeping the shoulders level, and push the knees into the hill. 

 

Repeat.

 

As a step 1, that is what I would do with you.


Edited by Skidude72 - 8/24/11 at 8:02pm
post #4 of 26

It's a short clip and you're skiing nicely but it looks to me like you're using your lightness on the crests of the bumps to generate an unweighted transition, rather than driving your center of mass forward and pressuring your tips down the downhill faces of the bumps - which will become more helpful on larger bumps. Start with a pole plant that's further forward towards your tips and then continue to reach forward after plant, rather than planting out to the side leaving the door open so wide.

post #5 of 26
Ski more with the tips, less with the tails
post #6 of 26

I wouldn't think that video of my skiing from 2009 would really be all that useful to providing feedback for what I should be working on now today. I think you need to get something current.

post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 

Yes, you are probably right, tromano.

 

And I know that after seeing those videos myself I was taken by the fact that my weight was back too far and my arms too wide, with hands not kept forward enough -- you all have observed the same things.  I've really worked on these aspects after taking quite a few lessons.  Part of my problem also was that the boots I was using then had quite a bit of forward lean which made it more difficult to assume a more upright stance.  I'm using different boots now with less forward lean (I forget the technical term for that).  So I do think that I have progressed quite a bit over the past two years and I know that I'm much more comfortable on both steeper terrain and the ungroomed so something good must be happening.

 

So why post the old videos?  'Cause here it is towards the end of summer and I find myself thinking about skiing very often and I'm eager to progress further and these are the only ones I have, unfortunately.  I'll post new ones when available.  Thanks for looking in the meantime.


Edited by bumpsrfun - 8/25/11 at 8:47am
post #8 of 26

I think your hands are back only by way of your other joints, ie fix them and hands will be fine.

 

Another thought before we have snow is a mental switch from defensive-ish skiing to more 

skiing on offense, getting down your chosen line with more offensive movements.

 

ie the pole plant:

  is it defensive, adding extra stability as your skis slid into the face of the mogul?

  (this also triggers you to "hold on" to that turn a bit longer, often includes upper body rotation)

 

 

 is it offensive, reaching for the backside of mogul and triggering you to:

     start the next turn

     extend as soon as you 'clear' that mogul

     get tip pressure down the backside

 

mogul specific pole plants

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRW0875eZGA

 

 

Its hard to tell from the heads on / close in view,

but a LOT of extension happens very quickly

in this video.  That extension keeps the skis on the snow.

post #9 of 26

The old video is relevent to a point but offering up to date advice based on that video seems a bit unwise. BTW, the feet close and aft stance made the wide hands for balance appropriate for the situation. Since you say things have changed perhaps the most interesting questions would be, 1. What gives you trouble nowdays? 2. What do you feel you do well? 3. How is that different from when the video was taken? Think a bit about those questions before responding though. Yes you said you feel your hands are further forward and you are more balanced on the skis but what did you change to make that occur? Did you simply move the hands forward, or did you move something else? Do you still push to an edge after a strong pivot?  How and how much do you use your ankles? Knees? Hips? Torso to absorb terrain?

I know that seems like a lot of information to ask of you but without snow all we can work on is your understanding of your own skiing. Once we establish your level of understanding, we may be able to expand on that but the movments used to express those differences require being on the snow to be truly understood.  

 

 


Edited by justanotherskipro - 8/25/11 at 10:51am
post #10 of 26

An updated video would be useful but based on the video, definitely stance for starters. In an effort to keep it simple; to progress, you should learn how to move your ankles in your boots. It's not that simple or easy a lesson to go through via a forum. But learning how ski with ankle movements will correct a lot of your stance. 

post #11 of 26

I agree with Ski Dude, but I would also like to see you seperate your feet into a wider stance, but particularly I want to see foot independence.  But clearly you should work on you fore-aft balance, and I don't think it has anything to do with your arms or poles.  Get your pelvis forward.  And you need to learn how to actively use flexion and extension in the right coordinated way, from start to finish of the turn.  

post #12 of 26

Hello,

 

I see three major things to work on. 

 

1)  You're leaning back too much.  Bring your hips higher and forward to correct that.

 

2)  You're skiing too "two skied".  Try for more independant leg action.  Lean to shift your weight more from ski to ski more and seperate your feet some.  Part of this problem is that your feet are too glued together. 

 

3)  You could skid less.  Concentrate on making your tracks as narrow as possible.  If you wash out your turns your tracks will be wider. 

post #13 of 26

Bring your hips and butt up or forward to start the new turn.

 

Work on the pole flick to help get forward. Block more with the pole plant. After planting your pole to turn. Turn your hand slightly inward downhill where you want to go.

 

More downhill ski at the end of the turn as it all happens in the previous turn.

post #14 of 26

Bumpsufrn - I will comment without looking at previous postings. So Im unbiassed. Lots of good things happening but also room for improvement. To me it looks like you are self thaught. You dont start your turns with any particular technique but rather with whatever works. Its kind of faking. Your back seat problem is not something you can easily get rid of. The reason is that without being in the back seat you will not be able to turn. The result of getting rid of the back seat in your case would result in not being able to turn anymore. Not a very good outcome is it? So my advice would be to explore different proper techniques for turning. Do your reading here on epic and other sites but promise me you will take some skiing lessons from good reputed instructor. Good flow, good speed, good athletisism, good spirit, now take your skiing to the next level. Thanks for posting the video.

 

tdk

post #15 of 26

 

Quote:  From bumpsrfun
Part of my problem also was that the boots I was using then had quite a bit of forward lean which made it more difficult to assume a more upright stance. 

That doesn't make any sense by the way.  More forward lean should put you in a more forward position.  Instead of letting yourself settle into a more forward position, you counteracted and sat back extra to be  absolutely sure the boots couldn't do their job, and weren't going to help you find a better position.  The boots that I use have the most forward lean on the market.  See my videos in my signature if you like, the link's there so people I give ideas to can see where the opinions come from.  I'm in those boots in 'em. 


Edited by Ronin - 11/4/11 at 9:31pm
post #16 of 26

too much forward lean can be a problem for some skiers.  In order to have an upright stance it requires that your hips are well ahead of your feet, which is difficult to do for certain kinds of skiing situations.  I don't think forward lean is the OP's problem.  

 

TDK is right, he needs to go back to the drawing board and have someone show him step by step, with an open mind how to construct a ski turn.  I don't think forward lean can explain his currently far far far aft stance.

post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blake Saunders View Post

 

That doesn't make any sense by the way.  More forward lean should put you in a more forward position.  Instead of letting yourself settle into a more forward position, you counteracted and sat back extra to be  absolutely sure the boots couldn't do their job, and weren't going to help you find a better position.  The boots that I use have the most forward lean on the market.  See my videos in my signature if you like, the link's there so people I give ideas to can see where the opinions come from.  I'm in those boots in 'em. 



Actually a boot with too much forward lean often does put people in the back seat because it limits their range of motion in the ankle so they often compensate with with their upper body... a classic symptom of too much forward lean is a big extension with the hips at the start of the turn putting the skier in the back seat (they may be flexed in the ankle but their centre of mass ends up back)... of course then they flex in the hips and often end up too far forward at the end of the turn...

 

Don't get me wrong I'm not convinced that's the issue here... just wanted to clarify that that can be a problem.

 

There is clearly an issue here with lack of mobility, being stuck in the back seat and an inability to turn with the lower body... which of in turn does not allow for strong edging.

 

Bumpsrfun... what I love about your skiing is the fact that you go for it and you attack. But tactically I would suggest slowing it down for a few runs and work on pulling your feet back underneath your upper body at the start of each turn then initiating with the legs.

post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntoski683 View Post

too much forward lean can be a problem for some skiers.  In order to have an upright stance it requires that your hips are well ahead of your feet, which is difficult to do for certain kinds of skiing situations.  I don't think forward lean is the OP's problem.  

 

TDK is right, he needs to go back to the drawing board and have someone show him step by step, with an open mind how to construct a ski turn.  I don't think forward lean can explain his currently far far far aft stance.



You took the words right out of my mouth mid type...

post #19 of 26

Forward lean is most important when skiing moguls. The Nordica Doberman has 6 degrees of lean the most of any ski boots today.  I tried on many boots then put on the Nordica and said ahha this is my spot. The position I ski in I want these. A lot of time we take the kids boots and give them a heel lift so they get more forward lean.

 

To me you have the end of the turn but not the start. Work on tip pressure to start b y bringing your hips and butt up to the tip of the ski where it is the softest and then rock back to the tail to end the turn.

 

Commit to the fall line more also.


Edited by cvj - 11/5/11 at 6:46am
post #20 of 26

cvj,

 

To be technical, adding a heel lift doesn't change forward lean it effectively changes the ramp angle of the boot. Doing this results in some stance and movement changes that are similar to changing forward lean but also some that are different.

 

I also get the feeling from your statements that you are using the heel lift/forward lean thing as a way to force someone who is in the back seat forward. THIS WON'T WORK!!

Humans have an instinct to keep their heads over their base of support. When you mess with the angle of that base (add a heel lift) or change the angle of the first supporting truss (change the forward lean of the lower leg) your body responds by adjusting the various joints of the body until the head is again centered over the BOS. The idea I use in doing fore/aft alignment is to put the skier into a neutral stance. From this neither forward nor back stance the skier has the choice to pressure the tips or the tail of the skis easily.

 

fom

post #21 of 26
I'm with borntoski and others, forward lean is not the problem. It's also not a problem of engaging the tips early on. No. The problem is in the fundamentals. By the way guys, how do you apply that much forward lean?
post #22 of 26

I stand by what I said. 

 

Also, it doesn't seem like a lot of us are even disagreeing that much.  With forward lean, he could be forward, but has managed to not be. 

 

Quote: From borntoski683

 In order to have an upright stance it requires that your hips are well ahead of your feet, ...

"Ahead of"?  I don't know man, that sounds kind of hard to do.  Ahead of the whole foot?  I guess it might depend on what you call an "upright stance".  Anyway, with more farward lean, your knee moves out towards your toes.  That would increase the degree to which you could put your hips forward as it is hard to move your hips past your knees. 

 

Quote:  From fatoldman

I also get the feeling from your statements that you are using the heel lift/forward lean thing as a way to force someone who is in the back seat forward. THIS WON'T WORK!!

I wasn't sure if you were talking to me here or not.  I don't use a heel lift.  I never have. 

 

      Quote: From tdk6

By the way guys, how do you apply that much forward lean?

Custom fit Dalbellos.  Look at this link here:  http://www.dalbello.it/us/rdp    Look at the picture of the boot under where it says 'DYNAMIC PERSONALIZATION".  Look at the third red arrow down.  See that thin white stripe?  That's a plastic wedge that you put into a space on the outside of the shell.  The wedges come in different sizes.  A wider one increases forward lean.  It works great.  The older models of dalbello did it with a dial over a really wide range, but the dial could move on it's own a tiny bit, so you had to check it at the end of the ski day.  The wedges work better.  I was a little worried at first that they could fall out, but they never do.

 

Quote:  From cvj

Forward lean is most important when skiing moguls.

I agree that forward lean is most important in moguls.  I like it everywhere else too though. 

 

 

 

 

post #23 of 26

Blake,

 

To clarify, the comment was directed to cvj but it applies to anyone who thinks that they can use the equipment to force someone forward, as I said above it won't work and trying to do it can create problems for the skier. Find fore/aft neutral for a particular skier and set their equipment up to encourage this stance, this allows the skier to have the finest, quickest and most precise control of pressure distribution along the length of the ski.

 

To respond to your advocacy of forward lean. Don't make the mistake of thinking that what is good for your particular body structure is good for everyone. We are all different. You or I benefit from a lot of forward lean but the fact is that most skiers out there have too much forward lean and that excessive forward lean can be one main reason they can't effectively pressure the fore body of the ski. Alignment is a very complicated subject and one where the facts often conflict with what we instinctually expect to happen.

 

fom

 

post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatoldman View Post

To respond to your advocacy of forward lean. Don't make the mistake of thinking that what is good for your particular body structure is good for everyone. We are all different. You or I benefit from a lot of forward lean but the fact is that most skiers out there have too much forward lean and that excessive forward lean can be one main reason they can't effectively pressure the fore body of the ski. Alignment is a very complicated subject and one where the facts often conflict with what we instinctually expect to happen.

 

fom

 



Exactly! And don't forget the binding in the mix.

More forward lean does not work for me. I have added 5mm under the toe of my boot and use bindings with minimal delta and/or shim them as such.

What is good for one is not automatically good for all. Best to work together with a good boot fitter to sort it out.
post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 

Wow, thanks for the new posts.

 

I'll measure the fwd lean on these boots of mine and report back.  I know they have quite a lot -- easily into the double digits and much more so than today's Langes for example (I compared them next to each other) and I have muscular legs and calfs which tend to push my lower legs even more forward.  I also feel that these boots are too stiff for me especially given my avg 5' 9" height and short leg length (inseam 30").  I'd really like to get a new pair of boots that are softer, with less lean and able to hold my medium to narrow width feet tight -- any suggestions?

 

I also take the point that these videos are old.  I think I've improved and will take new video this season.  I'm also set up to attend one of Harb's camps early this season so hopefully this instruction will help too.

 

Thanks again.

post #26 of 26

Ok. 

 

I'm going to have to make sure my wife doesn't feel like she has too much forward lean.  I dialed her all the way forward her first year and left it there ever since.  LOL  smile.gif

 

It seems to be working well for her though.  She's learned a lot in her first 3 years. 

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