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Where are these bumps?

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 

Anyone else have a remarkable lack of them where they ski? I'm not really looking for them, but there is no real bump scene in the NW. Contrary to what a few delusional fools try to say.

 

I suppose there are areas that get a little bumpy, but rarely do I see true moguls. There is only one run at Mt. Hood Meadows that is consistently moguled, and it's ridiculously short.

post #2 of 37

When I first went to Las Lenas there were absolutely none!

 

 

Aspen Mountain has really nice ones.  Highlands has a few nice bump runs, but the runs down to Deep T get nasty.

 

 

post #3 of 37

Squaw has lots of challenging bump lines spread all around the mountain. Hopefully the new grooming machines won't change that. Alpine has some nice bump lines as does Sugar bowl. Even Northstar left a few bumps. I haven't personally skied Heavenly's Gun Barrel recently but it is still supposed to be one of the best bump runs. Tahoe bump skiing is not dead!

 

Socal has no bumps. We need to develop a grooming machine that leaves a zipper line at the side of the run for those overgroomed mountains!

 

Eric

post #4 of 37

I'm not sure what you mean by a "real bump scene," but there are plenty of bumps to be found where I ski.  Sometimes Mt. Baker has huge dumps of snow that bury them for a while but as soon as it lets up a bit they re-form within a few hours.

post #5 of 37

Gunbarrel @ Heavenly is still a great bump run as per its reputation, but I highly recommend not doing it on your last run of the day (with it being located on the face right down to the CA lodge parking lot, I made that mistake more than once last year).  ;-)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by eleeski View PostI haven't personally skied Heavenly's Gun Barrel recently but it is still supposed to be one of the best bump runs. Tahoe bump skiing is not dead!


 

post #6 of 37

There are a good amount of bumps at the areas where I ski.  A few of the better ones typically include

     Beaver Creek off the 3 lifts that converge on the WC finish line

     Vail off 10

     Copper off A lift and Super Bee

     Breckenridge- SE facing stuff off Peak 10

     Keystone off the Outback

     Loveland under Chair 1

     A-Basin under Pali

post #7 of 37

Breck actually has quite a few good bump runs on the other peaks as well.  There's a trail on peak 9 called Shock I liked a lot last time I was out there.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MEfree30 View Post

There are a good amount of bumps at the areas where I ski.  A few of the better ones typically include

     Beaver Creek off the 3 lifts that converge on the WC finish line

     Vail off 10

     Copper off A lift and Super Bee

     Breckenridge- SE facing stuff off Peak 10

     Keystone off the Outback

     Loveland under Chair 1

     A-Basin under Pali



 

post #8 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEfree30 View Post
 

     A-Basin under Pali

 

Agreed. Looking at the trail map, I went to go check that area out, but on the lift ride up, I decided that I couldn't hang. Narrow, steep, and crazy bumpy. Looked like a LOT of fun, but required a bit too much skill for my level. On my ride up, I remember seeing a woman with what appeared to be a broken leg being rescued by ski patrol. Thus, I took the "easy" down.

 

Another great bump run is "Al's Run" at Taos, NM. Fun stuff.

 

post #9 of 37

We have two bump runs here.  They are basically steep trails on the back that are left ungroomed all season, so eventually bumps develop.  Then there is one run, Mully's, that is flatter and bumps develop over time, but when they get to be a total mess, they level them...comes to about three times a season.  Other than that, nothing.  Even the bumps on Black Bear and Marmot aren't the horrid things I've seen in the Poconos. 

post #10 of 37

At Breck: E Chair is nice & usually bumpy, Peak 10 Check out Spitfire & Peak 8 Southern Cross & Tiger.

 

Vail, I always liked the Prima & Pronto bumps.

The 2 longest thigh burners I  know are Outhouse @ Mary Jane & Al's Run @ Taos. If you can top to bottom those, you are da Man/Woman beercheer.gif

post #11 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinFromSA View Post

 

Agreed. Looking at the trail map, I went to go check that area out, but on the lift ride up, I decided that I couldn't hang. Narrow, steep, and crazy bumpy. Looked like a LOT of fun, but required a bit too much skill for my level. On my ride up, I remember seeing a woman with what appeared to be a broken leg being rescued by ski patrol. Thus, I took the "easy" down.

 

Another great bump run is "Al's Run" at Taos, NM. Fun stuff.

 

Next time head skiers right of the chair to the International/13 Cornices area. Still plenty steep but more open with options under the chair doesn't have.
 

 

post #12 of 37

MRG. take a trip its truly does rock for bump skiing.

 

.........I want to say stowe, but the upper management grooms bump runs to make the corporate elite feel better about their skiing ability on runs like chinclip, national, liftline, and centerline. They then leave them ungroomed after they have been pushpiled into 15 foot slabs of ice with bumps. If your the corporate elite and offended by this post, take a lesson, and realize this piece of truth.....

 

"its not that you can not ski the bumps, its that you can not ski and the bumps prove it!"

 

 

 

 

 

post #13 of 37

There are these two brothers who are pretty hardcore bump skiers at beaver. All they do it build and ski this single bump line all day long. Its deep and tight and pretty damn straight. They clear that line out within a day or two after it snows. But its pretty gnar and I tend to stay out of there.

 

Other than that, it takes like 2-3 weeks with no snow for moguls to develop on the rest of the hill. So we have moguls for maybe 3-4 weeks a year.

post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by eleeski View Post

Socal has no bumps. We need to develop a grooming machine that leaves a zipper line at the side of the run for those overgroomed mountains!

 

Eric


Actually, there is such a beast, and it was in use at Bear Mountain last season.  Initially, the zipper line was built for a snowboard competition, but skiers had so much fun that I hear rumors that this season it will be a permanent feature.  

 

post #15 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

We have two bump runs here.  They are basically steep trails on the back that are left ungroomed all season, so eventually bumps develop.  Then there is one run, Mully's, that is flatter and bumps develop over time, but when they get to be a total mess, they level them...comes to about three times a season.  Other than that, nothing.  Even the bumps on Black Bear and Marmot aren't the horrid things I've seen in the Poconos. 


I just went sightseeing at your mountain today. Looking forward coming back this winter when it is covered in snow. Looks like a hell of a fun place.

 

post #16 of 37

Hmmm, this is a funny thread!...... but I'll add to it =)

 

Where I ski there are two runs that are nice and long with decent pitch.  They are called Sleeper and Mary Jane Trail.  I rarely ski them because they are the only ones without bumps.

post #17 of 37

Not my favorite, but one of the longest bump trails I've been on is The Rapids on the backside at Northstar... over a mile long, bumps the whole way.  That will definitely get your legs burning.

post #18 of 37

Garrett Gulch, Snowmass.  It kicked my tail two years in a row -- not that that's saying much.

post #19 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

 

Highlands has a few nice bump runs, but the runs down to Deep T get nasty.

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post

Garrett Gulch, Snowmass.  It kicked my tail two years in a row -- not that that's saying much.



These were both pretty spiny last Jan at ESA! I believe we skied Sodbuster after our Highland Bowl run. 

 

 

Anyone actually skied Lookout Below at Whiteface? I've peered over the edge and seen a few people slide down...

There's usually a competition bump course set up at WF just above the Boules Bistro midlodge, off the Mountain Run/Little Whiteface Chairs. 

 


Edited by keniski - 8/26/11 at 8:17pm
post #20 of 37

If you are Northwestern, visit Alpental for a day. Upper International qualifies as a bump run.  Lower International is no slouch either.  At Crystal think that some of the best are down some of the little chutes off of Powder Pass (don't know if they even have names).

 

Or visit Sun Valley, what they lack in off piste they make up for in bump runs.  

post #21 of 37

One thing Mt Spokane has going for it, is the bump scene. There's a few guys that go up and hit the bumps everyday.

 

They usually have 4 great bump runs and often more in dry spells. I think Glen Plake's favorite run was Geronimo, under chair 4, when he stopped by last winter. Two face and Exterminator are also good ones that consistently have bumps.

post #22 of 37

Silver Mt also used to be good for bumps, but years lately we've been getting too much snow.  :D

 

Local guy that got his start at Silver: http://skiing.teamusa.org/athletes/patrick-deneen

post #23 of 37

Beaver Creek is great for bumps. 

 

As others have said Breck has quite a few options. The two big ones being E-chair and peak 10. Mach 1(i think) off of peak 8 sometimes gets bumps built for freestyle and if you can hit right when they open it it's a lot of fun 

post #24 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHoback View Post

At Breck: E Chair is nice & usually bumpy, Peak 10 Check out Spitfire & Peak 8 Southern Cross & Tiger.

 

Vail, I always liked the Prima & Pronto bumps.

The 2 longest thigh burners I  know are Outhouse @ Mary Jane & Al's Run @ Taos. If you can top to bottom those, you are da Man/Woman beercheer.gif

I second that, Winterpark Maryjane has some of the best bump runs anywhere and a lot of them.  The whole front of Maryjane is all top to bottom bumps with great shape and awesome tight trees on each side.  
 

 

post #25 of 37
Incognito, which Bear mountain? I'd love to check out both the line and the machine that creates bumps.
If it's the Bear mountain near Sonora CA, I haven't been there in years and a visit might be fun.
Eric
post #26 of 37

I don't ski real bumps much anymore - knees too old.  But good bumps need to be made by good skiers, with skis of a certain length.  Snowboarders trash bump lines.  Not trashing boarders, snowboards are the superior tool for many conditions.  Hack skiers trash 'em too.  Good bump lines are made by skilled skiers.  Usta be some runs had minimum ski lengths for certain runs.

post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by eleeski View Post

Incognito, which Bear mountain? I'd love to check out both the line and the machine that creates bumps.
If it's the Bear mountain near Sonora CA, I haven't been there in years and a visit might be fun.
Eric


It's the Bear Mountain resort in Big Bear Lake - sister resort to Snow Summit.  Used to be called Goldmine years ago.

 

post #28 of 37

Anybody have more tips for eastern bumps?  The only places I know that consistently let a lot of bumps exist are Sugarbush and Mad River Glen.  Sunapee has a few short decent pitches they let bump up.  The last time I was at Killington they had seeded bumps on the the bottom (least steep) section of Outer Limits.  Okemo was unique in that they actually had some bumps on blue runs (bravo -- how else will people learn?)

 

I'm not expecting anything to compare with a classic western bump run -- I just want to know if there are other places I should think of going within easy driving distance of me.

post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

Anybody have more tips for eastern bumps?

 

Skidder at Sugarloaf. It's their mogul comp hill and is usually very bumped up. Great for the hard core. Personally I like my bump runs a with a bit less pitch. In that category, Peachy's Peril and Parmachenee Belle at Saddleback are hard to beat.

post #30 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

Anyone else have a remarkable lack of them where they ski? I'm not really looking for them, but there is no real bump scene in the NW. Contrary to what a few delusional fools try to say.

 

I suppose there are areas that get a little bumpy, but rarely do I see true moguls. There is only one run at Mt. Hood Meadows that is consistently moguled, and it's ridiculously short.

 

For clarification, please define what you believe a "true mogul" is?   Height of bump, spacing, how vast/wide/long a mogul run is, whether or not snowboards typically shred there, what? 

 

Speaking as a NW native skier, there are several areas in WA that always have bumps on them (moguls as I understand them).   Alpental was mentioned, Crystal usually has bumps on several runs, I'm thinking Middle Ferk's and Sunnyside on the Rainier Express chair.  Northway is almost always moguled where all the chutes and bowls drop into Ottobahn, so it can be a pretty long mogul run.  At Steven's Pass, 7th Heaven is all moguls on the Rock Garden side, as well as the runs off the Double Diamond chair, all of this is pretty steep.  Roller coaster off the Tye Mill chair is nice single black mogul run. 

 


I agree with you about Mt Hood Meadows.  Most of the bumps are under the Mt Hood Express chair or sometimes in 1 Bowl, 2 Bowl, 3 Bowl etc.  That said, I loved skiing Meadows, nice long undulating groomers, lots of options for steeper lines off Shooting Star and HRM, not to mention Heather Canyon.   Good stuff all around- just not super moguled.  
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