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Hows Jackson Hole for beginners - Page 2

post #31 of 34

 

Quote:
I know you love your kids, but in this situation lessons might be a good idea.   Your kids will need some time to go at their own pace and JH has a whopping 10% beginner terrain.  If you don't want to spend half a day on Pooh Bear/Eagle's Nest and another half day on the *bottom half* of Apres Vous then I would strongly consider a lesson.

+1.  This is the same advice I would give at Snowbird.  If you ski with your kids (or anyone way below you in ability) on a mountain like this either you, they or more likely all of you will be unhappy.  Quality of instruction (like Snowbird, my expert son Adam will vouch for both) is excellent.  If you can't afford the lessons, go somewhere else or don't take the kids with you.

post #32 of 34

Jackson Hole is known for its more difficult terrain. And the fact that it is a wallet buster. You might want to go to a more family oriented place in order to get more bang for your buck. Save Jackson Hole for when your kids are making fun of how lame you ski...lol.

 

If you want to stay in that general area I would highly recommend Big Sky/Moonlight Basin, Montana. It is the largest ski area in the United States at 5,512 acres and you can choose to buy 1 ticket for all 5,512 acres or you can choose to buy a ticket for just Big Sky or just Moonlight Basin. The ticket for both mountains is like another $12 $13 I think. 

 

Big Sky has 3600 acres of skiable terrain making it the larger of the two. Big Sky has a ton of awesome groomers that are wide open and the snow stays fresh all day unlike here in the east.

You can get to Yellowstone from Big Sky by car in about 45 minutes to an hour. And you can ride snowmobiles through Yellowstone or take a bus with cat-tracks. 

 

Big Sky also has tons of terrain for advanced and expert skiers. Especially from the menacing looking peak. Doesn't matter what level skier you are Big Sky will not disappoint. 

 

Grand Teton National Park is just South of Yellowstone National Park. 

 

You can stay pretty close to the mountain for real cheap as well. I stayed at The Lodge at Big Sky. Prices range from $92-$182 per night. And it was a very nice hotel well run by a friendly staff. They had complimentary shuttles that ran all through the morning for about a 1 minute ride to the base of the mountain. The beds were quite comfortable. 

 

Another bonus with Big Sky is that there are virtually no crowds and no lift-lines. I could ski huge trails top to bottom and only see 2 people sometimes none. Then you get to the bottom and hop right on the lift or what 30 seconds at most. 

 

Buck T4's is probably the best restaurant in the area but they are also quite expensive. There bison is delicious though and they have deer which is flown in from New Zealand. It is casual attire though because of the tourist. 

 

There is also a Thai restaurant called Lotus Pad which serves pretty good Thai food. Although it is unconventional. 

 

All in all I would recommend Big Sky since I can guarantee you will not be disappointed by what it has to offer for anyone from a crazy expert to an intermediate/beginner and all there is in between. It is definitely one of the best places to take your family.

 

I went during the busy travel time of February vacation week for most schools and there were still little to no lift lines and virtually non-existent crowds.

post #33 of 34

Or, even cheaper, go elsewhere in Montana.  Like Whitefish, plenty of area for beginners and a WHOLE LOT cheaper for families.  The only issue is your reaction to fog...  :)

post #34 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Or, even cheaper, go elsewhere in Montana.  Like Whitefish, plenty of area for beginners and a WHOLE LOT cheaper for families.  The only issue is your reaction to fog...  :)



I forgot about Whitefish that place is still huge at 3,000 acres and tons of skiing for all levels. Good point about the fog too some people don't mind it, but I remember skiing as a kid, fog was scary.

 

It is only  31 miles to Glacier National Park one of, if not the most, beautiful parks in the United States. Many of the visitor facilities close during the winter although you can still tour the park on XC skis or snowshoes. Snowmobiles are not allowed as far as I know.  

 

I would definitely say either Big Sky or Whitefish. Both great places to take your family to ski, but like sibhusky said Whitefish is going to be a lot cheaper with the downside being the fog. 

 

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