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Need help finding the right skis for me.

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hello! This is my first post on EpicSki, I am hoping I will soon become an active member of your community.

 

Right now I need some help finding the right skis for this season - Currently the only pair of skis I have are 07' Line Invaders. I am I lvl 1 Ski instructor and this year I am working on (and hopefully attaining) my lvl 2.  This year I am also hoping to work at Big Sky.

 

So I need skis that will work at Big Sky, and help with my lvl 2 - a good turn radius, and not twin tips (unless the examiners don't care about them). 

 

Any suggestions will help me! 

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 22

If you buy the left ski, they tend to make the right ski part of the package. duck.gif

post #3 of 22

Twin tips won't harm you as far as getting certified in NRM so long as you can ski them to the L2 standard. 

post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by nolo View Post

Twin tips won't harm you as far as getting certified in NRM so long as you can ski them to the L2 standard. 


Well its good to hear someone say that. I think everyone I talked to last year said the examiners would fail me right away if I went to a exam with twin tips. 

 

post #5 of 22

Not to take this thread off track, but: I need to give you a disclaimer -- I haven't been active as an examiner in NRM for a decade, so I'm not in the loop, but in my day it was given, if a candidate can do the maneuvers and ski the terrain to the standard, that no one cared what ski they were using. Just to make sure, I checked the NRM website for the National Standards to which they subscribe and found this description of the skiing skills at L2:

 

Quote:

Level II­ certified teachers have the skills to make short­, medium­, and long ­radius turns on blue and groomed black terrain with minimal skidding. Skis make two separate, relatively defined arcs in the snow from before the fall line to completion. Skill application and accuracy may vary with terrain and snow conditions. Demonstrations should illustrate accurate movement patterns and reflect turn dynamics relative to the speeds and forces common to Intermediate zone skiers.

You need to decide if your source is credible or not, and how much you want a twin -- there are a lot of great twintips in the market today. 

 

 

post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 

The main people that told me this were my lvl 1 examiner and a co worker who was a lvl 3. My examiner was fine with it but just told me for lvl 2 some of the older examiners wont take you seriously if you have twin tips. But like I said I'm not sure how the examiners are in Colorado or Montana.

 

I don't really need twin tips, I will probably still use my Line Invaders for teaching kids. So I just need skis for training for my lvl 2 and free skiing. 

 

 

post #7 of 22

The most important thing is to get a versatile ski with a bias to soft snow conditions that makes you feel confident. Personally, that would be a ski with a 78-88 mm waist. 

post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 

ok great, so just an all mountain ski? Any suggestions on brands and models?

 

 

post #9 of 22
Your going to adapt to whatever all mountain ski u decide to get...so pick a good ski that fits your needs and go with it...i would imagine skiing a twintip will have a positive effect with the younger crowd youll be teaching...but it may have a bit of negative effect on the older generation...well the closed minded old schoolers anyways...prolly not enough to matter either way though id imagine...just a thought.
post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 

Went to the ski store and found a pair of 2010 Volkl Unlimited AC30. Would this be a good choice? 

post #11 of 22

Here's a good starting point: Crazy 88's revisited by SierraJim.

 

Some more good stuff: 2011 Mid-fat Reviews by Dawgcatching

 

 

post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by QuintinAdam View Post

Went to the ski store and found a pair of 2010 Volkl Unlimited AC30. Would this be a good choice? 



If you're going for your L2, you'll out ski the AC30.

 

EpicSki has some great ski shops represented that have some great selections for you.

Try Bud Heishman. He still has some 2011 leftover Blizzard Magnums (7.6 and 8.7) that he could help you out with.

Also, Start Haus has some awesome deals on some Nordicas.  

Send Philpug or Bud Heishman a PM and see what they can do for you.

 

post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the links Nolo! Very helpful.


Edited by QuintinAdam - 8/21/11 at 2:33pm
post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post





If you're going for your L2, you'll out ski the AC30.

 

EpicSki has some great ski shops represented that have some great selections for you.

Try Bud Heishman. He still has some 2011 leftover Blizzard Magnums (7.6 and 8.7) that he could help you out with.

Also, Start Haus has some awesome deals on some Nordicas.  

Send Philpug or Bud Heishman a PM and see what they can do for you.

 


I will send them a PM. the Magnums look nice. I am thinking the 8.7 would be to stiff for me to get used to based on reviews. I have been skiing on a really soft ski for like 3-4 years. 

 

post #15 of 22

Hi Quintin!  So good to see you here at Epicski!  Welcome  You'll get a lot of good info here to help you with your Level II next season!!!

 

I think you'd love the Magnum Quintin!!!  I'd love to see you carve some turns on it!  It was such a pleasure working with you this past season at Mt. Brighton!  You made a lot of progress this season and are on your way to Level II.  Getting you on some sharp edges would be nice to see!

 

The twin tips are fun to play with and to teach the kiddies on, but you have such perfect posture and with the twin tips mounted the way they are, it makes you look like you're totally in the back seat even though you're not.  I had a friend that had to buy tighter ski pants when he was training for Level II because his pants were so baggy that you couldn't see the angle of his legs and he always appeared to be in the back seat.  Once he changed his pants, you could see that his stance was fine.

 

Enjoy the rest of your summer, and please keep in touch from Big Sky or Vail.  Follow your dreams!!!!

 

~Anne~

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by QuintinAdam View Post




I will send them a PM. the Magnums look nice. I am thinking the 8.7 would be to stiff for me to get used to based on reviews. I have been skiing on a really soft ski for like 3-4 years. 

 


Don't rule it out.  Talk to Philpug and let him know what you're looking for.  He will steer you in the right direction.

FWIW, I came from Michigan and am familiar with the hills.  The Mag 8.7 isn't too much ski for the area, but it may be too stiff for you(though I'd be surprised if it is).  Snowmeiser is a great source of info too!

What are you stats: Height and weight? 

Or did I miss it in an earlier post?

 

 

 

post #17 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks Anne! A better fitting pant might be a good Idea as well. I also think new boots might help as well. and I'll be sure to keep in touch.

 

@Trekchick I am about 5'11 and 170. Also I would be using these at Big Sky. Still considering the 8.7's I'll be sure to message Philpug.

 

 

post #18 of 22

I know two patrollers that ski elan magfires and absolutley love them. I havn't  had the chance to demo any yet but they may be worth your time to look into them.

post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by QuintinAdam View Post

Thanks Anne! A better fitting pant might be a good Idea as well. I also think new boots might help as well. and I'll be sure to keep in touch.

 

@Trekchick I am about 5'11 and 170. Also I would be using these at Big Sky. Still considering the 8.7's I'll be sure to message Philpug.

 

 


Check your PM.

 

post #20 of 22

I'm kinda in the same boat (just got level1 w/ eye on level2) in the PNW. I'm 5' 8" 140# & teach mostly beginner kids on simple, plain, inexpensive, used Salomon Verse 7? in 150's.

 

I've gotten mixed suggestions for skis from level 2 & 3 people.

 

Originally I planned on clinic-ing on normal camber 2008 K2's, 78 waist. Some L2/3 people seem to think it's good to get the fundamentals down on a normal camber ski that has maximal edge contact.

 

However, I was eyeing early rise tipped skis b/c clinics where I am are frequently on ungroomed snow. The 2011 (not 2010) Dynastar Sultan 85's (mild early rise) were mentioned to me by multiple L2/3 people. The one-ski/uphill ski traverse (read: weight on outer edge) seems to be a real dinger for lots of candidates in my region, so I hear, so maximal (edge) contact weighs heavily on my mind (perhaps b/c I sucked at it this weekend).

 

So now I am thoroughly ambivalent to early rise vs trad camber. Completely not interested in twin tips as I'm not seeing freestyle/park stuff in the near future for me.

 

I kinda see myself starting PSIA stuff on trad camber early this season & progressing to the early rise ski. If anyone has other ideas or comments, please pipe up : )

 

 

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddirt View Post

The one-ski/uphill ski traverse (read: weight on outer edge) 

 


Am I understanding this correctly, tipping the ski downhill while traversing?eek.gif  How does that work?  I'd like to see a video of that.

 

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddirt View Post

I'm kinda in the same boat (just got level1 w/ eye on level2) in the PNW. I'm 5' 8" 140# & teach mostly beginner kids on simple, plain, inexpensive, used Salomon Verse 7? in 150's.

 

I've gotten mixed suggestions for skis from level 2 & 3 people.

 

Originally I planned on clinic-ing on normal camber 2008 K2's, 78 waist. Some L2/3 people seem to think it's good to get the fundamentals down on a normal camber ski that has maximal edge contact.

 

However, I was eyeing early rise tipped skis b/c clinics where I am are frequently on ungroomed snow. The 2011 (not 2010) Dynastar Sultan 85's (mild early rise) were mentioned to me by multiple L2/3 people. The one-ski/uphill ski traverse (read: weight on outer edge) seems to be a real dinger for lots of candidates in my region, so I hear, so maximal (edge) contact weighs heavily on my mind (perhaps b/c I sucked at it this weekend).

 

So now I am thoroughly ambivalent to early rise vs trad camber. Completely not interested in twin tips as I'm not seeing freestyle/park stuff in the near future for me.

 

I kinda see myself starting PSIA stuff on trad camber early this season & progressing to the early rise ski. If anyone has other ideas or comments, please pipe up : )

 

 


A good exam ski for L2 is something that you feel comfortable skiing some off piste crud and hold well enough to deal with re-frozen groomers. They need to be manuverable enough to function at low speeds when you do your  'compulsories'. IMHO there are some spectacular early rise all mountain skis (Rossi, Blizzard, Volkl, Dynastar, 78 - 98 underfoot) that I wouldn't hesitate to both teach on and use for exams. Boots though shouldn't be overlooked and will do more than any ski to help you meet the level two standards. Went through an L2 exam with someone who's boots were clearly very poorly fitted and buckled that you could see there was a huge gap between the rear of the boot cuff and calf. Tough to ski well when you're slopping around in your shoes. Talk to your trainers and make sure you've got your boots/fit/ and even buckling sorted out, then think about early rise skis.

 

 


Edited by markojp - 12/5/11 at 2:51pm
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