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New Midfat for Tahoe: Wailer 95 vs MX88 vs...?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

 

My active quiver has been thinned to:
  • 190 DPS Wailer 112RP (Tyrolia 13-DIN demos): Soft snow days
  • ______________________:  Midfat for variable or unknown conditions
  • 194 Stockli Stormrider XL (912Ti): Hard snow days
  • 188 PM Gear Bro Blems (Dukes):  Touring
  • 176 Fischer AMC 79 (12-DIN Railflex):  Early season, easy riders
 
The blank slot was formerly occupied by 186 Fischer Big Stix 84s with 17-DIN Tyrolias.  But I done loved 'em 'til I broke 'em.
 
Vital stats:  6'1", 205 pounds, fighting back middle age, prefer longer over shorter turns, faster over slower, power over finesse, whiskey over vodka.
 
What I'm looking for:  Versatility -- in terrain, style, and speed. Something relatively playful, but with very strong edge hold.  Depending on the weight, I might consider moving the Dukes from the Bros and doing some slackcountry.
 
Other skis I've tried in this slot:  The Big Stix, obviously.  The only thing that I really wasn't crazy about with the Big Stix is that they did need a fair amount of speed to make them useable.  But when I demoed the Watea 84, I thought they were really too soft to interest me.  Something in between the two would probably be perfect, which sounds like the Motive.  I've skied a few runs on the Mantra and been a bit bored.  And obviously, I've loved my two pairs of Bros, but for this, I'm thinking about something with a little less waist and a little more sidecut (although if I don't buy anything before the season starts, they might get used in this slot as a placeholder).
 
Current short list:  DPS Wailer 95 (185 or 195?), Kastle MX88, maybe the Fischer Motive 84.  The Wailer and Motive are kind of sentimental favorites, given my love for the 112RP and Big Stix, and the Kastle is on the list because I've never seen an unkind word about them (although the price certainly gives me pause).
 
Any other suggestions?
post #2 of 18

Nowadays a 98 is a mid.

As nice as MX88 skis, it has to be called (today)

a low mid.  Last season at Jackson, they looked like minis

on the tram.

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

I'm not terribly concerned about what's considered a mid.  (The XLs were, in their day.)  I'm looking for a mid in the context of my quiver.

 

As I think about it more, key factors are better edge grip than the 112RPs (which are pretty good, despite the width), but a more versatile and easier ski for daily use than the XLs.

post #4 of 18

IMHO, the MX88 is THE best ski. Period. I have yet to find a ski more versatile with such a huge range of performance. But there is a price for that...$1200. The Wailer95 is a real nice wide hard snow ski but I found that it did get tossed around in mixed snow. I think a MX88 and a RP112 would be a perfect 2 ski quiver for Tahoe.

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

I think a MX88 and a RP112 would be a perfect 2 ski quiver for Tahoe.


I suspect you're correct.  If only the Euro weren't so danged high.

 

On the plus side, I've sold off $575 worth of gear in the past two days, so I actually have some room to play.  But on the minus side, I need new boots this fall too.

post #6 of 18

I'll concur with Phil about the MX88, but if it's too $$, lot to be said for Elan Apex. Unafraid of weird snow, solid grip, substantial build. I've give the nod to the MX88 for most stuff involving speed, grip, or effortless initiation, but IMO the serious taper (21 mm I think) on the Apex gives it a more supple, any kind of turn works quality in bumps and trees. And it's a lot lighter, if you hike. Another approach would be the Blizzard 8.7, which I really like as a great fat carver for lift served; the 2012's have early rise. Not as slithery in tight places as the Apex, or as precise as the MX88, but its edge grip is as good or better than the MX88's, it's got as high a speed limit and better ramming crud than either. 

 

As far as the 98 mm comment, that category presents a conundrum. So many good skis there that you might not get much use out of your 112's or Fischers. Maybe not even your XL's. OTOH, if you see yourself as using the 112's a lot, even in lift-served crud or chop, then not clear why you need a high 90's ski. But modern high 80's skis pretty much negate the need for anything else down to actual race carvers. So when Phil says "two ski quiver," he ain't kidding. It's all about where we call home. Hmmm. 


Edited by beyond - 8/14/11 at 3:58am
post #7 of 18

Not exactly apples and apples but last spring I owned the MX78 and Motive 80.  I sold the Kastle. Don't sell the Motives short, even if they are half the price.

post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks, Steve.  I've got a real soft spot for Fischers, so I'm definitely keeping them in mind.

 

Beyond, thanks for the pointer to the Apex and 8.7.  Very interesting ideas.  It strikes me that the Elan Waveflex 82 might also be an option, but I think it might have a bit too much sidecut for my personal tastes.

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDad View Post

Thanks, Steve.  I've got a real soft spot for Fischers, so I'm definitely keeping them in mind.

 

Beyond, thanks for the pointer to the Apex and 8.7.  Very interesting ideas.  It strikes me that the Elan Waveflex 82 might also be an option, but I think it might have a bit too much sidecut for my personal tastes.



You won't like the Elan 82's. How about a pair of 194 Legend Pro's Jeremy Nobis's race room production prototype?

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

You won't like the Elan 82's. How about a pair of 194 Legend Pro's Jeremy Nobis's race room production prototype?


Too much overlap with my 195 PM Gear SuperBros, I suspect.  (Not listed because, well, I'm not really man enough to ski them.)

post #11 of 18
If you're looking for an 89mm ski, I have Dawg's 178 Stockli XXXL. Easier than your super Ross or 188 Scot Schmidts but still a lot of ski.
post #12 of 18


Now that's a versatile and playful skieek.gifwink.gif; (I keep mentioning that pair to people I see riding the same model with about 300 days on 'em. no takers yet; I assume the birdman's skis)

 

Another to consider, as I don't see much difference between a 88 waist and a 100 waist, the Salomon Shogun, at least for where you call home. 

You can stay with Fischer in the Watea model series, and probably get some of what you liked in the Big Stix.

 

I don't think the Stocklis in this width, Stormrider series models, are much fun at low speeds. They are pretty stiff aft.

 

Do you ride the DPS in cut up fresh and set up crud? That eliminates the need for the 88 to be a major crud basher, and opens up some models that have less metal and dampening.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post





You won't like the Elan 82's. How about a pair of 194 Legend Pro's Jeremy Nobis's race room production prototype?



 

post #13 of 18

Given your quiver and preference for speed and longer skis (you say playful, but none of your current skis are what I consider playful, except DPS112, but that's a special case),  I'd say don't make a decision until you try the new ProRider 105.  It is actually quite versatile, and it will give you the most important quality for Tahoe cruddy days- dampness.   I liked it a lot, it is noticeably better than the old ProRider, and I won't hesitate to ride it everyday in Tahoe.  It is not turn-on-a-dime playful, but it is very agreeable for just about everything you throw at it.  Shogun is also a great suggestion, but maybe not "manly" enough for you.  Old 194 LPR is A LOT of skismile.gif.  

post #14 of 18

Fischer Watea 101's......they do a lot of things fairly well.

 

192cm

 

101.png

 

 

post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Do you ride the DPS in cut up fresh and set up crud? That eliminates the need for the 88 to be a major crud basher, and opens up some models that have less metal and dampening.


Definitely in cut up fresh.  We didn't get that much crud this year, so not sure about that.  And very good point.


Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

Given your quiver and preference for speed and longer skis (you say playful, but none of your current skis are what I consider playful, except DPS112, but that's a special case),  I'd say don't make a decision until you try the new ProRider 105.  It is actually quite versatile, and it will give you the most important quality for Tahoe cruddy days- dampness.   I liked it a lot, it is noticeably better than the old ProRider, and I won't hesitate to ride it everyday in Tahoe.  It is not turn-on-a-dime playful, but it is very agreeable for just about everything you throw at it.  Shogun is also a great suggestion, but maybe not "manly" enough for you.  Old 194 LPR is A LOT of skismile.gif.  


I haven't really loved the Dynastars I've tried.  (Which surprises me, actually, since on paper, they seem like the kind of ski I would love.)  And I think my go-to two-ski-quiver should have more than a centimeter of width variation.  But if I'm not locked in by the time the snow starts to fall again, I may need to take them for a spin.

 

My reticence about the Shogun has nothing to do with manliness and everything to do with my perception that Salomon's quality and reliability is on a serious decline.  I can't picture buying Salomon until I'm convinced that the slide has bottomed and they're on the upswing.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

Fischer Watea 101's......they do a lot of things fairly well.


Tried the pre-boat hull design and was underwhelmed.

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I don't think the Stocklis in this width, Stormrider series models, are much fun at low speeds. They are pretty stiff aft.


I'd have agreed completely until I demoed the new Stormrider 95 (which I didn't recommend in this case because it seemed a bit wide and beefy for OP's needs, but hell of a big mountain stick that can dawdle better than the MX88. Tail seemed fairly progressive to me. And the VXL is a very nice ski at moderate speeds, I'd put it up with the MX88 and the Apex. OTOH, totally agree about the XXXL and such. But seriously, Stocklis have evolved in the last few years. They're not going after Blizzard tech aficionados, but they'l interest Kastle, Elan, Dynastar fans who like a more traditional design. 

 

post #17 of 18

good to know^^^, and glad to hear. I wonder where Stockli will go with design? Their sandwich/sidewall construction is so solid. they must have some interesting meetings with the marketing, design, and engineering people...though as French is to flamboyance Swiss is to conservatism in skiing. 

 

with rocker designs now, a quiver is different, as you could have two skis within 5mm of each other in width, yet if one was traditional camber and the other was banana rocker they would not have much overlap, IMO

post #18 of 18

I ski that should be considered is the new Rossi Experience 98. Real nice ski and powerful. 

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