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Mispronounced ski area names - Page 3

post #61 of 88

For those in the Seattle area, there is The Summit East, pronounced High-ak, Summit Central, pronounced Ski A-kers, and Summit West pronounced Snow-qual-me Some-et.

post #62 of 88

And at Stevens Pass there is Kerr's Chair, pronounced "Big Cheef"


Edited by Posaune - 8/12/11 at 10:41am
post #63 of 88

Quote:
Originally Posted by Squawker View Post


Of course, if using the genitive apostrophe it would be Stevens' (in the case of words ending in s the second s following the apostrophe is left off - and neither is it pronounced, so definitely not Stevens-es, just Stevens)
 


IIRC, it depends on if Stevens is singular or plural.  In other words, are we talking about multiple people named Steven, or one person named Stevens.  The first case would be Stevens'.  The second case would be Stevens's.

 

post #64 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by skibum4ever View Post

In Beverley Hills we have Rodeo Drive.  Ro'-da-o.  There are no horses so one cannot call it Ro'-dee-o.

        


Rodeo is a spanish word.    No one should say Rowdeeoh.   Ever.    It's as silly as Brits saying 'junta' with a 'j' from 'jeep'.   

 

 

/Bushmode

post #65 of 88

I seem to remember reading that there's a geographical difference between the northern and southern western states as to Roadie-O or Row Day Oh, but that's in the past and I may well have passed over it on my way to Steve's.

post #66 of 88

 

Quote:
I always called id Sh-weitzer as well.  But I know plenty of Spokane people that call is SS-weitzer 

Well, it's a German name so I've always used the German pronounciation "Sh-vy-tser".

 

Washingtonians often don't care about correct pronounciations...there is a town south of Seattle named "Des Moines" and they pronounce the last 's' even though the town is named after the capital of Iowa. And then there's Tacoma about 30 miles south of Seattle which was named after an Indian chief who's name was actually pronounced "Tahoma".

 

Back to ski resorts, I've never heard the 'o' in Mammoth pronounced as in "tooth"

post #67 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmaie View Post

 

And then there's Tacoma about 30 miles south of Seattle which was named after an Indian chief who's name was actually pronounced "Tahoma".

 

The local native languages use all kinds of sounds that we don't use in English.  I'll bet that if we heard it pronounced correctly it wouldn't sound like either Tahoma or Tacoma, but maybe kind of close to both.

 

Also, Seattle was named for a chief, Tacoma for a mountain. Tacoma/Tahoma was the identification for what we now call Mt. Rainier, not a chief.

 

 

post #68 of 88

Hunter Mountain is pronounced Hunt-er by the 2nd,  3rd and Nth generation locals.

 

Recent transplants from "THE CITY" , like its the only city on the planet earth, pronounce it wrong as Hunt-ah,

post #69 of 88

How about our volcano here Mt. Ruapehu with the ski field Whakapapa? Fu ck a papa

post #70 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post

Hunter Mountain is pronounced Hunt-er by the 2nd,  3rd and Nth generation locals.

 

Recent transplants from "THE CITY" , like its the only city on the planet earth, pronounce it wrong as Hunt-ah,

Dropping the R is one of the most common accents in the English language.  It's done in New England, parts of the US South, the UK, Australia, the Caribbean and Asia.   "Huntah" is a misspelling, not a mispronunciation.

And the City is still the City, and everyone understands that.  Without it, Greene County would just be a strip-mined hill billy heaven.

 

BK
 

 

post #71 of 88

I can confirm that we locals call it AL-TA like you can call me Al. Aal-ta (Ul-ta)? sounds pretentious. We have Dear Valley for people like that! 

post #72 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmaie View Post

Quote:
I always called id Sh-weitzer as well.  But I know plenty of Spokane people that call is SS-weitzer 
Well, it's a German name so I've always used the German pronounciation "Sh-vy-tser".

Washingtonians often don't care about correct pronounciations...there is a town south of Seattle named "Des Moines" and they pronounce the last 's' even though the town is named after the capital of Iowa. And then there's Tacoma about 30 miles south of Seattle which was named after an Indian chief who's name was actually pronounced "Tahoma".

Back to ski resorts, I've never heard the 'o' in Mammoth pronounced as in "tooth"

There are some small towns in Ohio that do the same. (PS - I know this is a 4 year old thread. I never saw it before. )

Houston ="house ton"
And my favorite
Bellefontaine = "bell fountain"
There were more but it's been 35 years since I lived there.

And I am hearing a lot of people pronounce couloir as cooler, like you put your picnic in.
post #73 of 88

In Massachusetts you can pronounce names any way you want, the locals have been  confusing me for years!  Wooster for Worchester, Vodker for Vodka and they made fun of me for saying Warsh ing ton instead of Wash ing ton.

post #74 of 88

Nice 4 year old thread.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by darent View Post
 

In Massachusetts you can pronounce names any way you want, the locals have been  confusing me for years!  Wooster for Worchester, Vodker for Vodka and they made fun of me for saying Warsh ing ton instead of Wash ing ton.

...except it's spelled Worcester. http://www.worcesterma.gov/

What, it's New England, not Classic England.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post
 

Tignes          see it as Tig-nayz, Tig-ness, but I guess the correct would be Teens,            eh?


Just "Teen" though it has a little sauce with it in French that I couldn't phoneticize.

post #75 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

...except it's spelled Worcester. http://www.worcesterma.gov/

 

for funsies

post #76 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by darent View Post
 

In Massachusetts you can pronounce names any way you want, the locals have been  confusing me for years!  Wooster for Worchester, Vodker for Vodka and they made fun of me for saying Warsh ing ton instead of Wash ing ton.

 

Not only is it spelled Worcester, its pronounced "Wistah". And anything that is further from Boston than Worcester is "West a' Wistah", which means a wicked long way away. 

 

Oh, and can the rest of the country please realized there is a U in the word "aunt" and stop pronouncing it "ant"? An ant is an insect. 

post #77 of 88
Sorry, you're on the short side of the see saw in the Ahnt/Ant pronunciation.
Quote:
The first (ANT) is by far the predominant American pronunciation. The second (AHNT) is common in the Northeast, some Southern dialects, and among African Americans.

British speakers today also prefer the second pronunciation (AHNT), according to the Oxford English Dictionary.

But many phonologists and other scholars have shown that the pronunciation of “aunt” varies widely in Britain, and that “ant” and “aunt” are pronounced the same by many speakers in the northern counties.

In fact, ANT was once the preferred pronunciation in Britain, so the dominant American pronunciation is actually older, a relic of British usage in the late 18th century.

The linguist and lexicographer M. H. Scargill has written: “Acceptable late-18th-century British pronunciation rhymed ‘clerk’ with ‘lurk,’ ‘caught’ with ‘cot’ and ‘aunt’ with ‘ant,’ and those pronunciations are the ones immigrants brought with them.”
http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2009/09/auntie-anxiety.html
post #78 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

 

Not only is it spelled Worcester, its pronounced "Wistah". And anything that is further from Boston than Worcester is "West a' Wistah", which means a wicked long way away. 

 

Oh, and can the rest of the country please realized there is a U in the word "aunt" and stop pronouncing it "ant"? An ant is an insect. 

woops, lived here for 40 years and still can't get it right!! Worcester is way way west, out by 495, Indian country?

post #79 of 88
If Wistah is Indian Country what's Williamstown?
post #80 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

If Wistah is Indian Country what's Williamstown?

 

A French outpost ;)

post #81 of 88

The Alta thing drives me nuts. Do you pronounce alternate Al - ternate or All - ternate. Also  ( Al - so) (All - so) , if the mountain was named for the Spanish word for high then it is definitely pronounced All ta. There are no words in Spanish that have the flat A sound like apple that I can think of. I cannot bring myself to say Al - ta as much as I've tried.

post #82 of 88

Nice bump!

 

So how do we say Blizzard??

 

And people go nuts when Coloradans say Byooona Vista. But it is Byooona Vista, or BV if you can't stomach the other. 

 

www.usends.com/Explore/Colorado/placenames.html

post #83 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by darent View Post

In Massachusetts you can pronounce names any way you want, the locals have been  confusing me for years!  Wooster for Worchester, Vodker for Vodka and they made fun of me for saying Warsh ing ton instead of Wash ing ton.

The strangest town name around here is Watertown. It is pronounced "water town", weird huh?
post #84 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Nice bump!

 

So how do we say Blizzard??

 

 

 

Or Kästle, for that matter.  It's not castle.  Americans in the industry seem to say kes-lee, but when that didn't seem right to me, I took it to an online speech synthesizer, which had it approximately kes-leh, nearly like the French le in Le Massif.

 

Des Moines, incidentally, is almost correctly pronounced by Iowans.  It's not dee moynes or duh moyne or d'moyne (the usual central-Iowa pronunciation), but day moyne -- not too far off for a bunch of midwesterners.  (It means of or from the monks.)

post #85 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Nice bump!

 

So how do we say Blizzard??

 

And people go nuts when Coloradans say Byooona Vista. But it is Byooona Vista, or BV if you can't stomach the other. 

 

www.usends.com/Explore/Colorado/placenames.html

As a Colorado native, I reserve the right to say Byoona Vista, because, like seg said, that's the name of the place, and no one has standing to correct me. :D

post #86 of 88
^^There is no way anyone here (US) is going to pronounce Des Moines the French way. Like "Tete de Moine" which is a really good cheese but smells like a dead animal in the basement only it's on the counter

I confess I've never had it shaved the proper way but ate it barbarian style scooping and slathering it on bread. It's probably the worst smelling yet best tasting food i've ever had.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tête_de_Moine

Now I simply can not get behind your Colo pronunciation of :

MV5BMTgwMzEzNzY0Ml5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMzY1MTYxMQ@@._V1_SX640_SY720_.jpg
Edited by Tog - 3/13/15 at 8:54pm
post #87 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

^^There is no way anyone here (US) is going to pronounce Des Moines the French way. Like "Tete de Moine" which is a really good cheese but smells like a dead animal in the basement only it's on the counter

I confess I've never had it shaved the proper way but ate it barbarian style scooping and slathering it on bread. It's probably the worst smelling yet best tasting food i've ever had.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tête_de_Moine

 

Monk's Head or Of the Monks —  the pronunciation is a bit like moyne, because the i in moines is made long by the e, so rather than mwahn (as it would be sans e), it's more like mo-een, though that's probably a bit strong.  

 

Having grown up in Iowa (with East Coast parents), I find it amazing that Iowans, who aren't typically linguistically sensitive, are so close with a tough foreign word -- no s for instance.  Usually.  

 

On the other hand, they'd likely pronounce ​moins (less in French) as they pronounce moines, so it's not so remarkable in fact.

post #88 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post

The Alta thing drives me nuts. Do you pronounce alternate Al - ternate or All - ternate. Also  ( Al - so) (All - so) , if the mountain was named for the Spanish word for high then it is definitely pronounced All ta. There are no words in Spanish that have the flat A sound like apple that I can think of. I cannot bring myself to say Al - ta as much as I've tried.
I'm pretty good in Spanish, and even though I've been away from CT for 27 years, I still say awnt, awlso, and, strangely enough, wawtuh, but ever since locals in Bluff and Moab pressured me into pronouncing the a's in "Alhambra Rock," "La Sal," and even "Moab" lie the a in "ham", I go with the prevailing pronunciation. Anyway, "Aulta" just sounds too country club for me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

^^There is no way anyone here (US) is going to pronounce Des Moines the French way.
I've always said "deh moyn" with a soft "y" sound. No idea where I got the right pronunciation from. My people aren't particularly sophisticated. rolleyes.gif
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