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The $2300 FS challenge... - Page 3

post #61 of 75
Quote:
Shuttle? 

Yes, using a motor vehicle at one end or the other.  The park at Spooner has a $20 shuttle with reservations or you can set up your own with friends.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
to access "Chimney" we started at the top (high point) of the fire road between Spooner and Marlette, climbed (well, I pushed) up the mountain that is between that point and LT, then took the single track down to Chimney Beach, which is right by Thunder Lodge. 
 

Gotcha, I have not done the single track to Chimney Beach, but would like to.

JF

 


 

 

 

post #62 of 75
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post

Yes, using a motor vehicle at one end or the other.  The park at Spooner has a $20 shuttle with reservations or you can set up your own with friends.
 

Gotcha, I have not done the single track to Chimney Beach, but would like to.

JF

 


 

 

 


I will say, as much fun the ride to that point was..other than the sick climbs, that last part was amazing. A must do. 

post #63 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

I think I saw that picture in a cave. 



 

 Yea. Back in the day it was amazing what folk could do. Ride stuff on rigid or HT bikes that in this day and age that no one would attempt with less than a six inch FS bike. But we reallly were clueless. Had no idea that we couldn't ride said stuff. Yet we did anyway. And yes, some of us did get hurt. Others, not so much.

 

Truth be told I am not a very good MTN  biker. I suck on technical stuff. But IMO the Flume Trial, the long loop as I have described is not all that technical. Cave painting or not, it ain't hard-just long. One does not need a six inch AM bike for that particular loop. For me the climb from spooner to Marlette Lake is the hardest part.

post #64 of 75
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post





 

 Yea. Back in the day it was amazing what folk could do. Ride stuff on rigid or HT bikes that in this day and age that no one would attempt with less than a six inch FS bike. But we reallly were clueless. Had no idea that we couldn't ride said stuff. Yet we did anyway. And yes, some of us did get hurt. Others, not so much.

 

Truth be told I am not a very good MTN  biker. I suck on technical stuff. But IMO the Flume Trial, the long loop as I have described is not all that technical. Cave painting or not, it ain't hard-just long. One does not need a six inch AM bike for that particular loop. For me the climb from spooner to Marlette Lake is the hardest part.



Maybe we should ride together, I am sad to say, I got my ass handed to me by a guy on a single speed...fully rigid..on this ride. I don't know what was worse, the bikes we had to ride back then or the skis we had to ski. 

post #65 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post





Maybe we should ride together, I am sad to say, I got my ass handed to me by a guy on a single speed...fully rigid..on this ride. I don't know what was worse, the bikes we had to ride back then or the skis we had to ski. 


Hey Phil, I suck as a rider. My observation is that, while a good bike helps---really it is about the rider. Gads, been left in the dust by more than one rider on a POS bike.

 

My style of riding has more to do with socializing and enjoying the country. If you ride with me I have to warn you....you might have to stop and smell the roses and worse...maybe engage in conversation eek.gif. Me: I like to do distance.see the land and get to know the folk with whom I ride.

 

The Flume loop is a fabulous ride. A must do. If you're intersted in an "enjoy the view, take your time" sorta ride....25 miles over six hours with stops for pictures-yea..let's hook up. I do not want to do a " let's see how fast we can do this 25 mile loop" sort a ride.
 

 

post #66 of 75

hey, late to the dance,  Congrats Phil! After the seller's email I totally agree this was a solid deal.   Seat posts- not sure if they have been up lately but I picked up a Crank Bro Joplin for 120.00 off of Chainlove last fall and love it. the older models had some serious issues but these seem fine. 

 

Those rides look awesome.  Cant wait to finally make the push out to Steamboat so I can ride Emerald and some of the other great trails.....

post #67 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post




Hey Phil, I suck as a rider. My observation is that, while a good bike helps---really it is about the rider. Gads, been left in the dust by more than one rider on a POS bike.

 

My style of riding has more to do with socializing and enjoying the country. If you ride with me I have to warn you....you might have to stop and smell the roses and worse...maybe engage in conversation eek.gif. Me: I like to do distance.see the land and get to know the folk with whom I ride.

 

The Flume loop is a fabulous ride. A must do. If you're intersted in an "enjoy the view, take your time" sorta ride....25 miles over six hours with stops for pictures-yea..let's hook up. I do not want to do a " let's see how fast we can do this 25 mile loop" sort a ride.
 

 




a rigid SS is not necessarily a piece of shit bike.

 

for the dropper post go to Rockshox Reverb.

post #68 of 75

The Rockshox Reverb is the 'Best in Breed' of the dropper post world... but hold onto your current seatpost. You'll need something to use if you have to ship the Reverb out for warranty, mine is in the mail to SRAM as I type this. I cut down my Thomson post that was on my trail bike to use on a DH bike, I wish I hadn't done that now.

post #69 of 75

What makes it superior to the Joplin (not challenging, just trying to learn) 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

The Rockshox Reverb is the 'Best in Breed' of the dropper post world... but hold onto your current seatpost. You'll need something to use if you have to ship the Reverb out for warranty, mine is in the mail to SRAM as I type this. I cut down my Thomson post that was on my trail bike to use on a DH bike, I wish I hadn't done that now.



 

post #70 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

What makes it superior to the Joplin (not challenging, just trying to learn) 
 


Lighter, better keys (doesn't move so much) and greater range of adjustment. Hydraulic remote is pretty slick too.

post #71 of 75

What Epic is saying by "better keys' is the reverb post moves side-to-side less than the Joplin or the Command Post or the Gravity Dropper. It feels very much like 'just a seat post' until you hit the hydraulic release and the post drops. The hydraulic remote also features an adjustment for return speed.

post #72 of 75
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

What Epic is saying by "better keys' is the reverb post moves side-to-side less than the Joplin or the Command Post or the Gravity Dropper. It feels very much like 'just a seat post' until you hit the hydraulic release and the post drops. The hydraulic remote also features an adjustment for return speed.



That does sound much safer. 

post #73 of 75

interesting, mine has virtually no side to side movement and the return to full is extremely fast, could they have improved them?

post #74 of 75

They certainly (probably) could have. The last one I rode swiveled like a bar stool. On the Rock Shox, return to full is fast if you want it to be, or slow if you want it. On the Specialized Command Post for example, it's like it wants to punch you in the groin!

post #75 of 75

I am thinking they must have. Its very stable and I am extremely happy with it. It is pretty heavy but I don't know the weights of the others. 

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