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Info I got from search and rescue several years ago,

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Back in the 90's while attending a memorial service for a fallen BC rider on Loveland pass (he died in a avalanche on the backside of A basin) a member of search and rescue was there and told us some really good advice to follow.    He told me and some other guys about an avalanche victim that he had dug out who was face down in the doggie position only a few inches from the surface.   He said when they first found him he assumed that he must have been knocked out because it looked like he could of just worked his way out and popped his head up because he wasn't really buried under more than a couple of inches of snow along the length of his back and head.   When they dug deeper they found that his arms were extended down (like in the doggie position) and they couldn't get his hands out.  When they dug down to his hands they found that his poll straps were around his wrists and the ski polls acted like anchors to both his hands.   It was later determined that he did die of suffocation and that he most likely would of survived had he put his straps around his hand in front of the thumb and not behind the thumb and around the wrist (or better yet, rid the polls while in the avalanche but who knows how violent that was).     Since that day I wear my straps around just my hands and not wrists.   While its probably one in a million that he died this way, every advantage is an advantage.   Just thought I would share info as it really doesn't effect anything while you are skiing, except you may drop a poll once in a blue moon when you get lazy skating on a cat walk.    I am sure many people already know and do this but it doesn't seem to ever get talked about so....  

post #2 of 6

Yes, good advice. Rid yourself of the poles immediately in an avalanche. If you know you are going into the backcountry or avalanche prone zones, then yes, remove the straps from your hands.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

There is a lot of info that should and could be shared on this site, like picking lines in the BC and not just relying on digging pits etc.... But I am beginning to realize that this isn't a site full of BC skiers, they seem to be few and far between.   Do you reside in Jackson hole?  

post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdiddy View Post

There is a lot of info that should and could be shared on this site, like picking lines in the BC and not just relying on digging pits etc.... But I am beginning to realize that this isn't a site full of BC skiers, they seem to be few and far between.   Do you reside in Jackson hole?  



What you need to realise, and hopefully quick...ie before you kill yourself....is that your "ideas" are either very rudimentary or full of half truths, hence no-one is listening (thankfully).  And when people who have spent a life time doing this stuff try to tell you what to do, you argue with them. 

 

Hopefully this time will be different...."  Route finding (the proper term for "picking lines") is done in conjunction with your pits....its is not a one or the other scenario....they work together.  How do you know where to dig your pits? vs. the line you are going to ski?  How far can you go before you should dig another?

 

You need to spend more time on the hill with experienced people or take some courses, there is lots to choose from.  There is more to being BC expert then being able to buy a pair of 110 rockered skis and a Pieps.

 

post #5 of 6

Nope, I don't reside in JH. It is my favorite place to ski in the US however.

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post





What you need to realise, and hopefully quick...ie before you kill yourself....is that your "ideas" are either very rudimentary or full of half truths, hence no-one is listening (thankfully).  And when people who have spent a life time doing this stuff try to tell you what to do, you argue with them. 

 

Hopefully this time will be different...."  Route finding (the proper term for "picking lines") is done in conjunction with your pits....its is not a one or the other scenario....they work together.  How do you know where to dig your pits? vs. the line you are going to ski?  How far can you go before you should dig another?

 

You need to spend more time on the hill with experienced people or take some courses, there is lots to choose from.  There is more to being BC expert then being able to buy a pair of 110 rockered skis and a Pieps.

 

 

I'll be nice,    Route finding, picking a line, , same thing.   I never implied not to dig a pit, so you are 0 for 2 now.   I would love to ski with someone of your ability and knowledge,  perhaps one day we will ski together,,, Last i have been skiing for 25 years 15 of which in the BC of Colorado with straight skis and I never said i was a BC Expert, in my opinion no one is, only nature.    Next time I am in Utah or where ever you live I will drop you a line.  

 


Edited by pdiddy - 7/29/11 at 10:03pm
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