EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › I swore I'd never do this....yet, here I am asking about a ski rec.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

I swore I'd never do this....yet, here I am asking about a ski rec.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Greetings.

 

What the hell, input is always good.

 

5'3, 145lbs. Strong legs and core.

 

Started off two seasons ago on the K2 First Luv 142 and outgrew them within a few weeks.

Great ski to learn on. Horrible ski to go fast on hardpack. I'd say I'm a damn decent intermediate.

 

Demoed the mid-line K2 (whatever the blue one was in the 153) Loved it.

 

 

So.......I have a few bucks to spend. Not a ton, but have scraped together a few dimes here and there.

 

What do you hear about the new K2 Super line? I want a ski that miiiiiiight be a bit much for me at the beginning of the season, but that I'll have for a few years.

 

Ski almost exclusively East Coast so read :hardpack. Mostly Sugarbush. I'd like to get good enough to try some

trees this season and I'll be taking lessons. I like lessons. A day with a good instructor is priceless.

 

I can handle any green and can ski down as opposed to "get down" most blues. 

 

Is the 2012 model that much different than the 11? And yes, I do want rocker. I loved it on the version I skied which was "catch free".

The next move up is "speed rocker".

 

See......I like to ski fast.....but I want stability. I'm not good enough to do Castlerock yet, but that's my goal by the end of the year.

 

PS, I love my boots, but they will need adjustments. I've got the Head Edge series, but they need some work around the ankles.

I'm not adverse to a boot call-out if there's something that might work better for me. I do NOT want a cement block on my feet.

 

We do first to last chair, almost every day and we average around 25 days. More this year.

 

Cheers mates! Think snow to keep cool.

 

Alli

post #2 of 17

I would look at the different ladies skis made by Dynastar and Volkl.

http://www.volkl.com/ski/skifinder.php?class=women_front

http://www.dynastar.com/US/US/dynastar-skis-women.html

Both companies make awesome skis, but I am personally more of a Dstar fan.

I would recommend the Exclusive Legend Eden.

 

post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allison Matura View Post

 

See......I like to ski fast.....but I want stability. I'm not good enough to do Castlerock yet, but that's my goal by the end of the year.

 

My personal advice is to buy an "advanced" ski (which could be a shorter men's "high performance" ski, if you do indeed have a few bucks set aside for this.

 

PS, I love my boots, but they will need adjustments. I've got the Head Edge series, but they need some work around the ankles.

I'm not adverse to a boot call-out if there's something that might work better for me. I do NOT want a cement block on my feet.

 

OK, you boots are nice enough and very comfy, however at 104mm last they are WAY too wide to allow good progression.  I'd highly suggest getting a 100mm boot (or narrower).  Now, it doesn't have to be a stiff "brick," but it should definitely be narrow enough to be responsive to your foot motion.


If you have the money, I'd suggest upgrading both skis AND boots this year.  And do not worry, believe me, you can find top-of-the-line boots super-cheap online if you search well enough (perhaps a prior-year model).

 

post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 

I guess I sorta knew that the boots were a wee too cozy and comfy.

 

And as you describe, this is the exact problem I have...feels like it takes half the hill to get the foot to engage the boot to engage the ski.

 

Can't do new boots and new skis in the same year....unless the bf decides to be really generous on my birthday.........heh.

 

And if I've learned anything as a re-newbie it's Boots First.

 

So I think I'll spend some time looking for boots. The bf does need new boots (he was skiing 15yo Lange's with blown out heel and toe pieces for god's sake...) maybe I'll go shopping. Heading up to Sugarbush next week for summer fun, may as well start looking!

 

I could swing new boots and a new last year ski that would work just fine. I know I need waaaay stiffer and longer.

 

And I think I can find a home for my boots and First Luvs....

 

Cheers all, think snow.

 

@

post #5 of 17

The tighter the boot, the more important it is to get it fitted properly.  An super-cheap internet purchase may not be such a great deal on that kind of product. If you are serious about upgrading boots, find a good bootfitter and work with them to get you into the boots that fit your foot well, perform well, and could last you many years. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueSquare View Post

If you have the money, I'd suggest upgrading both skis AND boots this year.  And do not worry, believe me, you can find top-of-the-line boots super-cheap online if you search well enough (perhaps a prior-year model).

 



 

post #6 of 17

Originally Posted by Allison Matura View Post
 

 

OK, you boots are nice enough and very comfy, however at 104mm last they are WAY too wide to allow good progression.  I'd highly suggest getting a 100mm boot (or narrower).  Now, it doesn't have to be a stiff "brick," but it should definitely be narrow enough to be responsive to your foot motion.

 

Wait - you can say that without knowing ANYTHING about her foot - REALLY. I have a EEE forefoot and need a 102-103 last or else it's complete agony that can't be cured by a bootfitter. So you're saying that I won't be allowed to get "good progression" because my boots are too wide. REALLY?

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by BlueSquare View Post

 

If you have the money, I'd suggest upgrading both skis AND boots this year.  And do not worry, believe me, you can find top-of-the-line boots super-cheap online if you search well enough (perhaps a prior-year model).

 


More bad advice. Go to a shop and get the right boot for your foot, then ensure that modifications will be made as part of the deal. If you feel the need to waste a shop's time then order by the net, beware of bad ju-ju.

 

 

Allison - exactly why do you want rocker for least coast skiing? It's primarily of interest for skiing pow, and you said you're typically on-piste.All rocker will do is minimize the amount of edge surface to deal with that "hardpack" that sounds real scratchy. Hey, whatever, but try some rockered skis on your usual terrain before you buy them. With 40+ least coast seasons, I don't see a need for rocker there particularly if you're typically on "hardpack".

 

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post

 


Wait - you can say that without knowing ANYTHING about her foot - REALLY. uhhh yeah, above she said shes not getting the edge response she needs with her edge boots... ooooo! (I've owned and skied in the Edge boots, and they are very comfy, but not good for someone who wants to progress)

 

I have a EEE forefoot and need a 102-103 last or else it's complete agony that can't be cured by a bootfitter. So you're saying that I won't be allowed to get "good progression" because my boots are too wide. REALLY?

 

Relax, I didn't say anything about you.  You have unusually wide feet (perhaps in the third SD from the mean?).  But what you really want is a tight fit in the ankle area... so if you have that with your boot, then you're good.  If not, you might be well suited to getting a narrower boot and then a major footbox stretch.  I have flipper-feet too, and I'm well aware of the struggles with getting comfort across the toebox, but unfortunately for such people sometimes a little pain is the cost for responsive boot performance.

 

 


More bad advice.    

 

All I wanted to make her aware of is the fact that great boots can be found online for very cheap. She mentioned (and has mentioned) that money is tight... therefore sometimes you have to figure out ways to procure items at a serious markdown. The OP went to Yale, so I think she is smart enough to figure out that she'll need to have an idea in advance of the shell fit, width, etc, before purchasing a boot online.



 

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:

 

Allison - exactly why do you want rocker for least coast skiing? It's primarily of interest for skiing pow, and you said you're typically on-piste.All rocker will do is minimize the amount of edge surface to deal with that "hardpack" that sounds real scratchy. Hey, whatever, but try some rockered skis on your usual terrain before you buy them. With 40+ least coast seasons, I don't see a need for rocker there particularly if you're typically on "hardpack".

 



Sugarbush isn't typically scratch ice and has had some massive dumps over the past two seasons.

What you get in the way north is constantly changing conditions and constantly changing snow.

 

 

Why do I want rocker?

 

I get the stability of a longer ski in the form of a shorter ski that nearly turns itself.

I skied a 163 (which is damn near exactly my height) that was as cheerfully maneuverable as my flat 154s.

I skied some K2 154s that were a blast and even in the mid-range ski tore through crud that my flats bucked me out of.

The maneuverability of the rockers I skied makes the trees seem less daunting.

 

I got better faster once I switched to rocker. I mean, like, really, really, really better. Way, way, way faster.

 

Cheers!

 

@

 

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

Boots online? Me? Agh. Never.

And to think I used to actually believe that all a boot did was keep your foot sorta warm and hold the ski on your foot.

 

Pride goeth before a whole lotta falls and stuffed tips and black nails.

 

Nope.

 

A good shop and better boot-fitter.

 

Who said the "date your skis but marry your boots"?

 

Love that.

 

Cheers,

 

Alli

post #10 of 17


 

Quote:More bad advice.    

 

All I wanted to make her aware of is the fact that great boots can be found online for very cheap. She mentioned (and has mentioned) that money is tight... therefore sometimes you have to figure out ways to procure items at a serious markdown. The OP went to Yale, so I think she is smart enough to figure out that she'll need to have an idea in advance of the shell fit, width, etc, before purchasing a boot online.


OK, you're on a bad advice roll, so enjoy. Right, as she's an Ivy Leaguer she can figure out shell fit, width etc via the web. rolleyes.gif. Funny, many boot fitters can't figure that out over the web, and they do that for a living read the sticky on the boot fitters forum. Or here -  OK, I have a EEE forefoot, a size 8.5 foot, a high instep, narrow ankle - what should I get that'll be super cheap?

 

Allison - read what Alexzn says and take it to heart. Remember - internet advice is worth what you pay for it, and this is a glaring example.

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Allison Matura View Post





Sugarbush isn't typically scratch ice and has had some massive dumps over the past two seasons.

What you get in the way north is constantly changing conditions and constantly changing snow.

 

 

Why do I want rocker?

 

I get the stability of a longer ski in the form of a shorter ski that nearly turns itself.

I skied a 163 (which is damn near exactly my height) that was as cheerfully maneuverable as my flat 154s.

I skied some K2 154s that were a blast and even in the mid-range ski tore through crud that my flats bucked me out of.

The maneuverability of the rockers I skied makes the trees seem less daunting.

 

I got better faster once I switched to rocker. I mean, like, really, really, really better. Way, way, way faster.

 

Cheers!

 

@

 

So you should probably get some 190+ S7's then you'd be REALLY, REALLY good, way, way, way, way faster.
 

 

post #11 of 17

To echo some of the previous sentiments, dont mess with boots! Online is a bad idea, go to a ski specific shop that knows what theyre talking about, try on everything, and buy the one that fits best. Every foot is different, so recommendations from internet randoms isnt really all that useful when selecting a new boot.

 

As to rocker, it seems that the latest thing is a cheeky bit of tip rocker to give a little extra float on an otherwise conventional, turny ski. Im all for that, but id stay away from a fully rockered ski if youre mostly on the east coast. Yes, theyre easy to turn, but to develop your skills from intermediate to a more advanced level you really want some camber underfoot so that you can work the ski and create a bit of energy in your turns.

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamadam View Post
Yes, theyre easy to turn, but to develop your skills from intermediate to a more advanced level you really want some camber underfoot so that you can work the ski and create a bit of energy in your turns.


This is true. I was looking t it as a way to get the stability of a long ski, but I take your point.

 

Thanks!

 

Cheers,

 

Alli

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 

>>The OP went to Yale, so I think she is smart enough to figure out that she'll need to have an idea in advance of the shell fit, width, etc, before purchasing a boot online.<<

 

An Ivy League degree does not in any meaningful way whatsoever correlate to logical thinking and common sense. Trust me.

 

Heh.

 

 

Cheers,

 

Alli

post #14 of 17

You are on the right track with getting a well-fit pair of boots. 

You don't need length for stability in a ski these days, if you get a high-enough level of ski.  Longer will help in cruddy conditions, but if you are on hardpack, you should be fine with a 160 cm ski that is rated for decent speeds.

 

I suggest you spend your money getting a pair of boots that feel like you've stepped into some deep muck while wearing plastic bags around your feet.  You need a very snuck fit around the anlkes and heel pocket, and a snug fit everywhere else except for some wiggle room for your toes, and the boot shouldn't cut off your circulation on the top of your forefoot.

 

I also suggest you get a subscription to the realskiers review site and make a short list of skis that meet the top speed rating category, has top carving marks and is rated suitable for both experts and intermediate carvers.  Then wait for a 2nd hand or left-over ski to come on sale.

post #15 of 17

OK, so now we're getting some where.... now that we have coverd the boots, can I make a ski recomendation?  I really like the Blizz' Black pearl. Yes, it's new and not dirt cheap but it is priced well and really is a super versitle ski that would be ideal for where she's skiing and looking to develop skills with; a ski you can ski now but grow with over a few seasons. Stable, slight rockered (early rise) good width underfoot.  

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

OK, so now we're getting some where.... now that we have coverd the boots, can I make a ski recomendation?  I really like the Blizz' Black pearl. Yes, it's new and not dirt cheap but it is priced well and really is a super versitle ski that would be ideal for where she's skiing and looking to develop skills with; a ski you can ski now but grow with over a few seasons. Stable, slight rockered (early rise) good width underfoot.  



x2 the Black Pearl rips. with out seeing you ski I think the 159 would be the ticket.  If you like rockered for what you were skiing and thought it made it easier, I would not listen to someone who never skis the east coast on what you should buy.

 

I use the men's version in 180cm as my everyday skis after I got it last year. It is truly good on ice, great in bumps, and probably the best non powder tree ski I have ever tried, and still rips in light amounts of powder. its carves great on true hardpack/ice and basically makes skied out bump runs and woods its biatch.

 

the first minute is some footage while skiing the bushwacker's nofun should listen while he watches for sure.

 

 

100 percent of this video in on the Bushwacker's. if your familar with smuggs the entire liftline including some of the bigger drop is on this POV. For the hardpack/scraped/crud/rock drop/untracked in the woods I could not of though of better ski for the day.

 

 

basically you could ski anything in the video on a conventional midfat or SL ski. But me personally can do it easier on something like the bushwacker, because its easier I can go faster, and use less energy than prior to the bushwacker...

 

disclaimer for bluesquare

 

Bushwacker, the only beef I have with you is you posting (and implicitly pimping) POV videos of high-speed tight-tree skiing, and doing so without any safety disclaimers that will affect 95% of human beings that watch those videos you post.

 

Some kid is going to watch your POV of risky skiing through tight glades and they are going to seriously hurt or kill themselves when they try to go out and imitate it.  I bet someone out there already suffered because they felt pressured to ski quickly through the trees like you do in your POV.

 

 

Perhaps post those videos with a disclaimer that that is one kind of skiing that you do, a kind you need to be a pro to do safely, and that there are other kinds of skiing where you can have fun and be a lot safer.

 

It goes along with the attitude you project... "if you are not skiing glades like me, then you are not doing it right..."

 

 

 

Beyond that, I think you confuse some people, as I am yet to see a post of yours that is without grammatical/spelling errors.  I think some people may misinterpret what you say because what you intend to communicate and what you write are two different things.  And further, I think you mean well but often come across as abrasive and scolding when you are trying to help.  Perhaps you can imagine how you'd speak to your pupils at Stowe during lessons when communicating with other users at EpicSki.

 

 

to 95 percent of the skiing population. do not attempt what you see in the video. bluesquare thinks its dangerous.

 

 

 

 

 

post #17 of 17

I think blue square was talking about some high speed tight tree videos, not videos like the above, unless you had that set on slow motion. biggrin.gif

 

That being as it may be, that first video seems to me like a very good video at showing what the ski (male version anyway) is good at doing and how it does it.icon14.gif

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › I swore I'd never do this....yet, here I am asking about a ski rec.