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Where to go for heli or cat skiing?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I am 57 years old and have been skiing for 25 years.  I am a slower skier now due to my Parkinson Disease.  I want to cat or heli ski in some intermediate terrains.  Where should I go?

 

In 2007, I skied Powder Cowboy and did alright.  In 2009, I had difficulty in Bobbie Burns.  That was too much for me.  Your comments are appreciated.

post #2 of 17

Do you want lodge based or a day trip?   If your really slow, cat is probably a better option.  

post #3 of 17

You should take a look at Bob Peters Wiki about his Heli Skiing Experience

http://www.epicski.com/wiki/alaska-heli-skiing-trip-report

post #4 of 17

If he had difficulty at Bobbie Burns, I don't think he would be an ideal client for ARL?  ARL is about as aggro as they get!  

We had an experienced heli skier that wouldn't even get out of the ship on one precarious LZ.

 

Sure, If you book a private ship, Bruce and Theo will find you great terrain for your level.  But the average client is going to be on the aggressive side and a heli can only go as fast as the slowest client in the group. You don't want to be the slow guy, unless your paying for everyone else?

 

Snowcat's on the other had are slow, usually even the slowest client will still beat the cat down.  

post #5 of 17

Shredhead, You're right, sorry, I just get stoked about Bob's TR whenever I hear the question about heli skiing.

 

Since I've never actually done it, and just drool about it..........well.......it just makes me a little crazy.

biggrin.gif

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

Shredhead,

 

I could do either lodge-based or day trip.  I probably lean towards to day trip just in case things don't work out.  On the other hand, if the guides gradually upgrade the terrains with slow clients in mind, I would like to do a lodge-based trip.  

 

The tricks are- how do you find a slow group of skiers?  When I skied at Bobbie Burns, they were skiing as fast as they could (Why shouldn't they? I understood that).  And how do I practice skiing powder in the Northeast?  All powders are skied off within an hour as soon as they fall.

 

post #7 of 17

Not that I have any experience with this, but why not start with a cat skiing trip at some where like Steamboat, Copper or Kirkwood.  That may be a good way to warm up to something bigger and/or deeper.th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #8 of 17

The CatSkiing suggestions are good.  As for finding slow groups, things are relative, but generally you struggle to find fast groups!  Just call the varous operators, they want to help you out, and will know their clientelle etc.

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

Trekchick,

 

That is not a bad idea.  I will keep that in mind.  I skied Kirkwood, Steamboat and Copper.  But I have not done cat skiing in these places.  Do they get crowded?

post #10 of 17

I have not done any of those Cat Skiing adventures, but we have some bears who have.  Philpug, Segbrown, Finndog........  I'll nudge them to pop in here.

 

post #11 of 17

The cat skiing at Copper isn't really "cat skiing"  like you guys are talking about. It's free, but you do sacrifice a bit of skiing time while waiting in the ubiquitous line. Then it's a 10- to 30-min hike to the skiing. It can be really good skiing, but it's often close to an hour of queueing/riding/hiking for a less-than-5-min run. (That's why it's free.) 

 

More traditional is the nearby operation at Ski Cooper/Chicago Ridge. When we went there, the terrain was all intermediate, and the group was not terribly fast. There was a variety of abilities, certainly, but nothing aggro at all. I would not hesitate to recommend it as a less-intense version.

post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

The cat skiing at Copper isn't really "cat skiing"  like you guys are talking about. It's free, but you do sacrifice a bit of skiing time while waiting in the ubiquitous line. Then it's a 10- to 30-min hike to the skiing. It can be really good skiing, but it's often close to an hour of queueing/riding/hiking for a less-than-5-min run. (That's why it's free.) 

 

More traditional is the nearby operation at Ski Cooper/Chicago Ridge. When we went there, the terrain was all intermediate, and the group was not terribly fast. There was a variety of abilities, certainly, but nothing aggro at all. I would not hesitate to recommend it as a less-intense version.


Thats the one I was thinking about!  Thanks for clearing it up

 

 

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thank you Trekchick and SegBrown.  That is exactly what I am looking for.  Believe it or not, I used to live on Elm St in Leadville for a winter.  It was 15 minutes drive to Cooper.  I never skied Cooper because I had to pay.  I was a ski resort employee in Summit County and I skied free everywhere except for Cooper.  It is a small world.  Now, I have to get my lungs in shape.

post #14 of 17
John, the places in Colorado I'd think about are Steamboat Powder Cats, Aspen, Chicago Ridge, and the place out of Winter Part (can't remember the name of it). Of those, the only one I've done is Aspen. I understand they all have intermediate terrain. Steamboat is supposed to have quite a bit of intermediate terran, good snow, and good trees; perhaps FinnDog will weigh in on that.

Aspen was great. The cats depart from the top of Aspen Mountain, and they've got quite a bit of terrain on the back side of the mountain that they ski. It's also where they now hold the US Powder 8 Championships. I had a great experience there.

Mike
post #15 of 17

Have you looked into the Cat Skiing @ Powder Mountain? Same as above regarding Ski Cooper. Nothing hardcore and not as high up either.

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

 the place out of Winter Part (can't remember the name of it).

 

      http://www.powderaddiction.com/

 

Chip just started this up a couple of years ago and I haven't gone yet, but I've heard good things.  

 

I think most of the places mentioned would be fine for a day trip.  Steamboat or Aspen's operation have multiple cats, so finding a compatible group shouldn't be a problem. 

 

A very good dude runs the Aspen operation. Since it's owned by the skico and run as an amenity, he doesn't have to worry about paying bills. His philosophy is if it's not good, we don't go.

 

Powder Mt. you can buy single ride tickets or all day in a separate area and wouldn't be a bad place to get your powder legs.  If your willing to hike, you can get a lot of untracked and you don't even need the cat. 

 

Good Luck, just go out early a lot and you'll figure it out!

 

 

post #17 of 17

I skied with K3 Cats last winter. They don't have a lodge so they pick up days skiers in Revelstoke and Sicamous B.C. at whatever hotel you are staying at. They turn off the highway to rendevous with their cat about 20 min. from Revelstoke and 10 min. in the other direction from Sicamous. They offer a discount if you ski 2 or more days in a week and have no problem with ski a day, take a day off, ski a day.

 

I plan on skiing with K3 again this coming season and will do the day off in between and tourist about in Revelstoke or if it is really dumping, then turn the day off from cat skiing into a day or part day at Revelstoke Mountain Resort.

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