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Best Smith goggle frame?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

After seeing how many people here love the Smith sensor lens for flat light, I decided I want to get a pair of goggles with sensor lens. Any suggestions on what frame to go with? (price isn't an issue) I want something that won't fog and will fit well with my helmets (Giro Fuse, soon to be replaced by Giro Omen, and Giro Remedy S CF).

post #2 of 28

I am partial to the I/O since it is so easy to swap out lenses. I carry the Sensor and Ignitor as my two lenses and have yet to find a condition that one or the other lens won't work. That lens combination is also a common "package" that comes with the I/O frame. 

post #3 of 28

I'm with Philpug on the I/O, and its a good fit with most helmets.  I also have the Smith Turbo Fan  Phenom frame which is also great for not fogging, but its not easy to change the lens' when you want to.

 

post #4 of 28

Does anyone know if there's any difference in frame size between the I/O and I/Os?  I recently picked up the I/Os and I think the lens swap option is great.  It feels a little small on my face, but maybe I'm just not used to it.

post #5 of 28

yes, there is definitely a difference.  before buying the I/Os, i tried the I/O on and it was too big.  I share the sensation of the I/Os feeling a wee small on my face but, for me, it was by far and away the better fit.

 

i never had much trouble swapping lenses on my regulators.  it's taken me a little while to get used to switching out the I/O, but now that i am it works pretty slick.

 

dave

post #6 of 28

I love the Smith Fuse. 

 

It is available with the same lens tints that the IO/IOs has, but is much cheaper.  For the same price as a pair of I/O's, I can buy two pairs of the Fuse.  That means I never have to change lenses, I just change goggles.

post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdave69 View Post

yes, there is definitely a difference.  before buying the I/Os, i tried the I/O on and it was too big.  I share the sensation of the I/Os feeling a wee small on my face but, for me, it was by far and away the better fit.

 

i never had much trouble swapping lenses on my regulators.  it's taken me a little while to get used to switching out the I/O, but now that i am it works pretty slick.

 

dave



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by RootDKJ View Post

Does anyone know if there's any difference in frame size between the I/O and I/Os?  I recently picked up the I/Os and I think the lens swap option is great.  It feels a little small on my face, but maybe I'm just not used to it.

 

I ended up getting the I/O instead of the I/Os, because I liked the added peripheral vision it gave me.  

I know some people who prefer the I/Os for fit, and don't seem to lose the peripheral that I felt I lost.
 

 

post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the replies. Sounds like I/O or I/Os is the winner. I'll try to find a ski shop with both to try on and see which I prefer.

 

I have a Giro Manifest with a black lens and a gold lens, but the gold lens has been fogging recently and anti-fog treatment is not working, but the black lens is fine, and I'll probably get a clear lens for the I/O for night skiing. Anyone have any input as to whether or not Sensor+Clear+Black will cover all conditions? Should I have something else for average days, or will the sensor be good whenever black is too dark? Is the Ignitor that Philpug mentioned still worth having? I also read in another thread that the RC36 is good?

post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeganFreeskier View Post

Thanks for all the replies. Sounds like I/O or I/Os is the winner. I'll try to find a ski shop with both to try on and see which I prefer.

 

I have a Giro Manifest with a black lens and a gold lens, but the gold lens has been fogging recently and anti-fog treatment is not working, but the black lens is fine, and I'll probably get a clear lens for the I/O for night skiing. Anyone have any input as to whether or not Sensor+Clear+Black will cover all conditions? Should I have something else for average days, or will the sensor be good whenever black is too dark? Is the Ignitor that Philpug mentioned still worth having? I also read in another thread that the RC36 is good?


I like the Ignitor but I tend to err on the "lighter" end of a lens. As far as the I/O vs. the I/OS, make sure you try the I/OS before buying, even smaller faces have had issues with peripheral visibility. Bring your helmet with you when you go to try goggles too. 

 

Oh, Smith has something called the Helmet HElper which is a band that expands the strap. It is a big help if you are wearing a helmet with the goggles. 

 

post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 

I'm definitely going to try to try on the I/O and I/OS with both of my helmets, but if I can't I'll probably go with the I/O.

 

According to the Smith website, the Ignitor is 35% and the RC36 is 36% (I assume the numbers mean light allowed through), so is there any advantage to one over the other?

post #11 of 28

The Ignitor is mirrored. I will say I have never tried the RC36 though. IWith the I/O coming with two lenses, I don't think the RC36 is one of the lenses used in the packaging. 

post #12 of 28

I have used both the Ignitor and the RC36 and see little difference between them.  I may be the only person to 'fog up' with I/O and ended up selling mine last year.  For visibility, I found the I/O compared great with the Prodigy/Prophecy, but I fog up less with the Prodigy/Prophecy.  I have no idea why, except that the Prodigy/Prophecy is supposed to have enough room to wear over glasses, so there may be more space between my face and the lens.  If swapping lenses is the way you want to go, then I agree that the I/O much easier for this, and the two lenses that come with the I/O should cover you for all conditions.  I find that I tend to put a lens in, leave it and adjust my skiing for the various conditions.  I used the Sensor mirror for 2 years in everything from storms to bright sunlight -- in bright sunlight, I had to squint occasionally, b/c it doesn't block much light.  I accidentally left my goggles on a heating vent and the Sensor lens warped, so I am back to using the RC36 -- as far as I am concerned, it is good enough...  The I/Os is for a smaller face -- if you tend to cause goggles to fog up, then I would certainly hope that the I/O will fit your face.

post #13 of 28

For fatheads like me it's the Prodigy, pinheads go Phenom, one Sensor and one Igniter, done and done.  These are really wonderful goggles.

post #14 of 28

The Clear/Sensor/Black is a waste in my opinion.  With the Sensor, you won't need the Clear.  I have the Sensor, Ignitor, and Red Sol-X to cover all conditions, they're a better range I think.  Using the Ignitor as an all-purpose for brighter conditions is certainly debatable, but the Clear/Sensor combo is unnecessary.  Go with the I/O, hands down, and grab the Sensor/Ignitor combo.  If you are sensitive to bright light (like I am) then grab a Sol-X lens and you've got all conditions covered.  Swapping lenses is simple, can even be done on the lift.  Seriously.

post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the suggestions. I'll probably go with the I/O with Sensor and Ignitor, and keep my black Manifest for the really bright days.

post #16 of 28

Top shelf choice!

post #17 of 28

I think that the ignitor has slightly better contrast than the RC36.

post #18 of 28
Tangentially, I've been using the Zeal optics goggles with polarized/photochromic lenses and I've found then to be very good in just about all conditions. They are pricey, but I've been happy with them
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by elskier View Post

Tangentially, I've been using the Zeal optics goggles with polarized/photochromic lenses and I've found then to be very good in just about all conditions. They are pricey, but I've been happy with them


I have those too and for bright days they are great. The Sensor Mirror is much better in flat light in my opinion.

 

post #20 of 28

Not to derail this (apologies in advance), but do the photochromatic lenses really work?  How well?  Wouldn't the polarized version be too dark if the lens can adjust to low light anyways?

 

I gotta say the Sensor is better than the Oakley persimmon by far for flat/low light.

post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

Not to derail this (apologies in advance), but do the photochromatic lenses really work?  How well?  Wouldn't the polarized version be too dark if the lens can adjust to low light anyways?

 

I gotta say the Sensor is better than the Oakley persimmon by far for flat/low light.



Bob,

 

I have found the PC lenses to be like "all mountain skis", they perform equally poor in a multitude of conditions. I prefer a quiver a of lenses including the awesome Sensor which is also better than my previously favorite Oakley Hi Intensity YEllow. 

post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

Not to derail this (apologies in advance), but do the photochromatic lenses really work?  How well?  Wouldn't the polarized version be too dark if the lens can adjust to low light anyways?

 

I gotta say the Sensor is better than the Oakley persimmon by far for flat/low light.



I love mine, and I know others whom have converted happily as well. That said, I've never used Sensors for low light -- the photochromatic ones work as well as my old yellow lenses, whatever they were.

 

I think it depends on the importance placed on convenience: I really hate worrying about which goggles, or which lenses, to use on a particular day. And then you have days where it's partly sunny and then it snows, and then it's sunny again ... I don't carry around extra goggles with me, so these work great for that. 

 

It also possibly depends on where you ski ... I am usually in Colorado, so we are not socked in with flat light all that much. I might have a different opinion if that were the case.

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post





Bob,

 

I have found the PC lenses to be like "all mountain skis", they perform equally poor in a multitude of conditions. I prefer a quiver a of lenses including the awesome Sensor which is also better than my previously favorite Oakley Hi Intensity YEllow. 


I totally agree with Phil.  I think you are better off having a pair of the PC lenses for a sunny day, that will lighten up a tad once the sun goes behind the mountain and your skiing in the shade.  However, on low light days I will just stick with the Sensor Lense.  I use to use the yellow lenses on a powder day and have found my vision works much better with the Sensor Lense in low light conditions.  Likely depends on your eyes.  My vision is 20/30 and sometimes I feel like it isn't the best in low light, so the right goggles can make a big difference to me.

post #24 of 28
The Zeals I use actually turn to yellow in low light (the SPPX lens). I've found very versatile, and they beat the hassle of carrying multiple lenses - especially in variable conditions.

Having said that I'm sure they're not as good as dedicated lenses for specific conditions.

A friend of mine has the transcend goggles with the built-in GPS & display, and for the geeky they are uber cool!!
post #25 of 28

I have a set of Prodigy's, Phenom's and Scope Graphics.  My Prodigy's have a tendancy to fog at the top fo the lens, the Phenoms fog at the bottom of the lens, and the first set of Scope Graphics I had froze on a cold clear day at Jackson Hole while riding up the gondola with them on my head.  Iced the lens over until it was useless.  Then I used them on a sloppy wet day and they filled up with water.  I sent them back to Backcountry.com for another pair and haven't had either problem with them since.  So I guess aside from looks, the Scope is better than Phenom and Prodigy.

post #26 of 28

SPAM ALERT! 

 

I'm selling some brand new I/OS goggles right now, with two lenses for $80. 

 

Linkypooh:

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/104389/fs-smith-i-os-smaller-frame-io-with-extra-lens-80-ship 

post #27 of 28
post #28 of 28

I use the IO with the Sensor Mirror, Ignitor, and Platinum Mirror lenses.  I used to use the SM for all conditions and it will work, but I find my eyes don't appreciate it as much on bright days.  I have used the SM for night skiing, but it blocks more light than I would like and I would reccomend using a clear lens if money isn't an issue.  I've been too lazy to order one and use a crappy pair of Scott clears that fog or safety glasses.  Then I bitch about it as I night ski while patrolling about once a week.  As Phil said, the Ignitor is a decent all purpose lens.  I tend to use it the least as I really like the Platinum Mirror on bright days.  I like the IO overall because it really is easy to change lenses and I carry an extra in my jacket every day.  I have always flailed trying to change lenses on any other goggle I've ever used.

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