EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Mockumentary:The Lost People of Mountain Village
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mockumentary:The Lost People of Mountain Village

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

 

Ski Town Evolution: The Lost People of Mountain Village

This is a two part, 14 minute sarcastic look at what has happened in some mountain communities.

post #2 of 17

This is very funny!

post #3 of 17

Love it!

 

post #4 of 17

frown.gifbiggrin.gifmad.gif

post #5 of 17

Thanks for that link. Great stuff and I added another book to my reading list...

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

I'm glad people enjoyed this mockumentary. I think it's important to see what is happening in some mountain communities. 

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulskier View Post

happening in some mountain communities. 


Happening?  I think you mean happened, at least in mountain communities that have a ski area.

 

It is very, very, very, very, very difficult to find any authentic mountain communities left.  By authentic, I mean where primary residences outnumber second home owners, where the streets haven't been manufactured by a corporation, and there are people left in the community that remember a distant past before the ski area existed.  Where can you find that in Colorado?  Silverton?  Maybe Leadville?  Utah?  Nowhere?  Montana has a few places left.

 

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinn View Post




Happening?  I think you mean happened, at least in mountain communities that have a ski area.

 

It is very, very, very, very, very difficult to find any authentic mountain communities left.  By authentic, I mean where primary residences outnumber second home owners, where the streets haven't been manufactured by a corporation, and there are people left in the community that remember a distant past before the ski area existed.  Where can you find that in Colorado?  Silverton?  Maybe Leadville?  Utah?  Nowhere?  Montana has a few places left.

 

 

Bridger Bowl, MT and Mad River Glen, VT are the two that have retained their soul and not been corporatized. 
 

 

post #9 of 17

I don't think they are the ONLY two, just two examples.  Red Lodge?  Blacktail?  Turner?  Snowbowl?   I don't even think Whitefish is that bad, but then I wasn't born here.  I think the only MT ski area that has clearly become "corporate", in fact, is Big Sky.  Move on to Idaho..  I'm not familiar with any of them, but I think it would be safe to say that only a couple/three are "corporatized". 

 

It's probably a good bet that, aside from maybe three (?), ALL the resorts on the SKI magazine top 30 are the "corporatized" ones, but there are close to 427 ski areas just in the US listed on Wikipedia.  Even if you toss out 100 of them for being so inconsequential they shouldn't be listed (or maybe they are closed), you're left with plenty of non-corporate areas.  And they've all got dedicated followers.  People need to widen their vision of where they want to vacation beyond those lists in the magazines.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by soulskier View Post



 

Bridger Bowl, MT and Mad River Glen, VT are the two that have retained their soul and not been corporatized. 
 

 



 

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 

I don't think it's a coincidence that the corporations have purchased most of the ski resorts located in reliable snowbelts, with exciting terrain. 

 

Here's a link to Resorting to Madness, Taking Back Our Mountain Communities. It is 50 minutes long and was filmed in 2007.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I don't think they are the ONLY two, just two examples.  Red Lodge?  Blacktail?  Turner?  Snowbowl?   I don't even think Whitefish is that bad, but then I wasn't born here.  I think the only MT ski area that has clearly become "corporate", in fact, is Big Sky.  Move on to Idaho..  I'm not familiar with any of them, but I think it would be safe to say that only a couple/three are "corporatized". 

 

It's probably a good bet that, aside from maybe three (?), ALL the resorts on the SKI magazine top 30 are the "corporatized" ones, but there are close to 427 ski areas just in the US listed on Wikipedia.  Even if you toss out 100 of them for being so inconsequential they shouldn't be listed (or maybe they are closed), you're left with plenty of non-corporate areas.  And they've all got dedicated followers.  People need to widen their vision of where they want to vacation beyond those lists in the magazines.
 



 



 

post #11 of 17

Be prepared for a LONG movie here, folks, it's 50 minutes.  If you've read Powder Burn and Downhill Slide, I don't think there's much new here.  It concentrates on the "big players". 

 

The point I was trying to make is there is lots of great skiing at smaller resorts like Red Lodge, Bridger, Snowbowl, Turner, etc. here in Montana.  The terrain is here, the crowds and Disney feel are not.  Yes, there are pressures, no argument here, to develop.  But, fortunately, along came the recession.  Housing prices have tumbled.  At least in Whitefish, there are extremely dedicated people keeping an eye on development and clean water issues.  In fact, it's probably the biggest issue in our political arena.  Of course, the fog is on our side.  roflmao.gifWhen Hines had their big plans, I kept asking if God was on their board of directors and planned to change our weather.  Fortunately, they are gone and the current management is making sure that their profits going forward will be based on operations, not real estate.  I wouldn't be surprised if a bunch of other places have had the importance of this brought home to them in the last three years. 

 

And I think the biggest factor affecting a move to the mountains (as to a vacation) is the availability of broadband in these communities.  Without it, that move would be far more difficult. So, the sprawl is due as much to resort developers as to the ability for an iPhone to work or availability of high speed data access.  Think of how much more "remote" a house is when there's no interstate, iffy flight access, PLUS bad cell phone coverage and ...DIAL-UP internet access.  The number of people wanting a house in such an area is vastly reduced.  Broadband has made it much easier to earn an income in these areas.  That, to me, is a bigger driver for the real estate than anything else.  With no broadband, you fill hotels, you don't build houses to the extent we're talking about.  For there to be  vast swaths of subdivisions, you need the ability to be connected to revenue sources outside the mountain community.  Personally, I don't mind these trophy homes out in the outskirts.  They get heavily taxed and contribute to the local infrastructure without using much of it.  It's the McMansions on 1/4 acre lots that impact the environment the most, not the single house surrounded by 100 acres and only lived in for three weeks a year.  Now, there are problems with people whose great granddaddy lived here and now they can't afford the taxes on the house, but that is more a "how do you tax" issue than a development and environmental issue. 

 

Anyway, the "fake" feel of Colorado is not as prevalent in Washington, Idaho, and Montana. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by soulskier View Post

I don't think it's a coincidence that the corporations have purchased most of the ski resorts located in reliable snowbelts, with exciting terrain. 

 

Here's a link to Resorting to Madness, Taking Back Our Mountain Communities. It is 50 minutes long and was filmed in 2007.
 



 



 

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 

I am currently in the Kootenays, BC and am happy to report that both Nelson and Rossland have retained their charm and mountain community vibe.

post #13 of 17

Probably because they aren't normally listed in SKI magazine. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by soulskier View Post

I am currently in the Kootenays, BC and am happy to report that both Nelson and Rossland have retained their charm and mountain community vibe.



 

post #14 of 17

There are plenty of ski towns in Washington and none are corporatized, simply because they are not located at the ski area base.  You have to drive or bus to get to the hill.  It also helps in some cases that large urban areas are fairly close at hand.  Not ideal, but it keeps the riffraff out for the most part.

post #15 of 17

I am a lost person of Mountain Village. 

 

I owned a condo in MV from 2001 - 2007.  When we first went to Telluride we stayed in town.  Decided to buy a place there and the property in my price range was much nicer in MV than in Telluride.  Plus we had ski in ski out.  A tremendous benefit that one doesn't fully appreciate, until it is no more.  I loved the time I spent there even though it was only 4 weeks a year (let the flames start).

 

Even as a part time resident, I would marvel at the huge homes that were on the mountain where in the 10 years of skiing Telluride that  I never saw anyone use except the snow removal guys.

 

We still go back twice a year and stay in town (insert plug) and stay at the Hotel Columbia.  Not ski in ski out, but it is only 50 feet from the gondola and after a night in Telluride I don't have to take the long gondola ride home in sub zero temperatures.  But I miss the view out of my living room window of the south facing of the San Sophia ridge.

 

 

 

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I don't think they are the ONLY two, just two examples.  Red Lodge?  Blacktail?  Turner?  Snowbowl?   I don't even think Whitefish is that bad, but then I wasn't born here.  I think the only MT ski area that has clearly become "corporate", in fact, is Big Sky.  Move on to Idaho..  I'm not familiar with any of them, but I think it would be safe to say that only a couple/three are "corporatized". 

 

It's probably a good bet that, aside from maybe three (?), ALL the resorts on the SKI magazine top 30 are the "corporatized" ones, but there are close to 427 ski areas just in the US listed on Wikipedia.  Even if you toss out 100 of them for being so inconsequential they shouldn't be listed (or maybe they are closed), you're left with plenty of non-corporate areas.  And they've all got dedicated followers.  People need to widen their vision of where they want to vacation beyond those lists in the magazines.
 



 


Maybe it's just me, but I think Alta seems to retain its non-corporate feel despite being large and having some modern amenities.
post #17 of 17

I'd agree with that.  Like I said, I think there are maybe three in the top 20.  On the other hand, not sure I'd characterize Alta as a ski town, more like a string of lodges...  Whitefish is a TOWN. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post



Maybe it's just me, but I think Alta seems to retain its non-corporate feel despite being large and having some modern amenities.


 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Mockumentary:The Lost People of Mountain Village