EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › What's the advantage of a ski specific vise?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What's the advantage of a ski specific vise?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I'm sick of tuning my skis on a creatively placed pile of cardboard boxes, but I don't particularly want to spend $100 to upgrade.  I have been trying to determine what would be a better fit for my needs:

 

1.  A set of normal clamp vises like one of these:

http://www.amazon.com/3-Universal-Aluminium-Table-Vise/dp/B0013E2AQY/ref=sr_1_53?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1310670340&sr=1-53

 

http://www.amazon.com/Adjustable-Clamp-13025-Light-Duty-Clamp-/dp/B00004S9KO/ref=sr_1_56?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1310670340&sr=1-56

 

http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-MaxSteel-83-069-Multi-Angle-Vise/dp/B000UOJF66/ref=sr_1_84?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1310670501&sr=1-84

 

or

 

2.  A cheaper ski vise that doesn't have a clamping vise:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Swix-Performance-Vise-2011-T2121/dp/B001H69ZQ6/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1310670568&sr=1-1

 

The swix vise at $60 is about the cheapest I've seen on that type of vise, but still would cost nearly double of the first two non-ski vise options without an actual way to clamp down the ski.

 

I'd like to do edge work and basic base work (flat filing, repairing small gouges, waxing, etc).  I should point out that I don't really "enjoy" tuning skis.  It's a means to an end, but I've been spending too much time with my ghetto setup, and/or too much money dropping off at shops.  That said, I don't want to spend $100+ for a vise setup.

 

The questions I have are:

1.  Does the swix vise actually hold the skis well enough vertically so that I can effectively debur and sharpen skis?  It looks like they just sit there via friction.

2.  Will the normal vises be strong enough to hold the skis vertically for edge work? 

3.  With the normal vises, will it be difficult to mount a center clamp with ties to my bindings in such a way that I can basically recreate the horizontal setup of the swix vise for base work?

 

Basically it seems to me that the normal vises (especially the first cheap one with rotating ball joint) would be a much better option, regardless of cost, but everyone always seem to talk about "upgrading from normal vises".  Is the level of swix vise I'm looking at really an upgrade from the cheaper clamp vises?

 

I'd love to hear from anyone who has experience with either of the setups I'm proposing.  Thanks so much for any wisdom you can provide!

post #2 of 14

1. Yes.   The hold-down is a variant of a 'lasso clamp'

 

The ski vise is also extremely useful for non-ski work on round stock like pipes, dowels, closet rods, kayak/canoe paddles

 

2. Maybe.   But the metal jaws will bite into ptex and all the jaws are going to be useless for edge-up work if you have uneven topsheets on your skis.

 

 

post #3 of 14

I advise to spend the extra money. It's always more up front but a year or two from now you will wish you had the nicer one. There is a Russian proverb - 'I am not wealthy enough to afford cheap tools'.

 

 

 

 

post #4 of 14

Cheap, easy and effective?

 

Take an old ski boot that fits your bindings, mount it upside down some how, bolt it, what ever, then when you go to tune, just click the bindings into the upside down boot, and your ski is locked base up.  I used to use hockey pucks to then support the tip and tail.  Works great, and uses the skis own bindgings as your vice.

post #5 of 14

I found a killer ski vice for cheap on ebay and grabbed it.  It makes tuning much easier.   Yes, they hold the skis just fine both ways.

 

During my single days I took a thick hard plastic cutting board and traced out my ski boot on it.  I cut out the pattern and belt sanded it to the height of my ski boot toe and heel.  Then I attached a couple stacked pieces of  2" x 4" to it.  I then click the device into my bindings, turned it upside down and fastened it into my workshop vice.  It worked just fine, but a ski specific vice is much better because it fastens the tip and tails in two different ways. 

post #6 of 14

That's the rub, my binidngs are set at at least 10 or 11, either Tyrolia FF 17+ or Atomic race 10.18 or Neox TL12.

 

there ain't no just clickin' it in,dude! And I don't want to screw with the DIN settings everytime I stick a ski in the vise! (The 10.18 don't go below 10)

 

Rather have a real ski vise and I like the padded hold downs in the tip/tail supports for side edge work!

post #7 of 14

Quote:

Originally Posted by dwoof2 View Post

I advise to spend the extra money. It's always more up front but a year or two from now you will wish you had the nicer one. There is a Russian proverb - 'I am not wealthy enough to afford cheap tools'.


...or "A fine tool hurts only once when it is purchased. A cheap tool hurts every time you use it."

 

A super value and highly versatile is the T4B Cinch vise, especially when it is mounted on a track system. Prep and wax a pair at a time saves tons of time and steps. On light side edge work you don't need to lasso clamp the skis and can whip out the job. For more aggressive edge work, the lasso clamping system is pretty solid, but not the same as a metal vise clamping tips and tails.

 

 

 


Edited by Alpinord - 9/22/11 at 4:52pm
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice.  I think I'm sold on the benefits of a dedicated ski vise vs. normal vises.  Now I'm kind of intrigued by the tools4boards vises.  I'm looking at the following vises right now:

 

Swix performance fix vise: $60

http://www.amazon.com/Swix-Performance-Vise-2011-T2121/dp/B001H69ZQ6/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1310919437&sr=8-6

 

t4b cinch vise mentioned by alpinord:  $89
http://www.slidewright.com/tools4boards-cinch-ski-and-snowboard-vise_t4bsms2020.htm?cat=50

 

t4b cordloc vise:  $69

http://www.amazon.com/Tools4Boards-S2050-CordLoc-Ski-Vise/dp/B000I4WWH2/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1310919437&sr=8-7

 

t4b pro 500 vise:  $75

http://www.amazon.com/Tools4Boards-Pro-500-Ski-Vise/dp/B000I4S1X6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1310919437&sr=8-1

 

From your experience, can you point out some of the differences/benefits of one vise over another.  I'll be using my deck railing to clamp down whichever vise I get, so I won't be buying the t4b stand.  Looks like the cordloc may not have as good a setup as the cinch for edge work.  Also, I'm wondering how the pro 500 mounts sideways?  If all vises will lock down skis no problem vertically and horizontally, I'd just assume go with whichever is quickest, most versatile, and smallest.  Thanks again for your help!

post #9 of 14

The $20 more for the Cinch over the Cordloc is well worth the difference. Hands down, the Cinch is the most versatile. It's the only one of this bunch that can support a pair of skis and a snowboard. You can bolt the Cinch (or Cordloc) to your railing, bench or board versus clamping or a track system or the Terminator stand.

 

If you prefer the T4B Pro500, getting an extra boot is a good idea to reduce swapping between skis and steps. The Pro500 boot is on a lockable swivel that rotates edge to edge and flat. You can pop the ski up and out and rotate 180° and quickly rotate so that the other edge work is base away.

 

There are several vises similar to the Swix Fix vise which will all do the job OK. Whichever one you get, once you get used to it and figure out a system, you can cruise through your tuning tasks more efficiently.

 

HTH

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

That's the rub, my binidngs are set at at least 10 or 11, either Tyrolia FF 17+ or Atomic race 10.18 or Neox TL12.

 

there ain't no just clickin' it in,dude! And I don't want to screw with the DIN settings everytime I stick a ski in the vise! (The 10.18 don't go below 10)

 

Rather have a real ski vise and I like the padded hold downs in the tip/tail supports for side edge work!


Yah dont get me wrong, I actually have proper vices too....but when I was younger the upside down boot trick worked great.  The main reason I got proper vices was becuase as I got older I was no longer just tuning my own skis, hence the boot thing didnt work anymore.  As for not being able to push a 10 down thou...th_dunno-1[1].gif  what do you think my bindings are set at?  4?
 

 

post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

Other than the ability to mount snowboards or two skis at once, what are the differences between the cinch and the cordloc?  From the pictures, it's tough to see how the mounting is different.  Can anyone else who has used the swix vise (or something like it) weigh in?

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skelonas View Post

Other than the ability to mount snowboards or two skis at once, what are the differences between the cinch and the cordloc?  From the pictures, it's tough to see how the mounting is different.



The bases are the same:

 

 

cinch.gif

Cinch

 

CordLoc.jpg

 

CordLoc

 

post #13 of 14

I'm using my own variation this....http://tognar.com/toolbenchplans.html   Ski specific AND CHEAP

post #14 of 14

I use the T4B Cinch Vise that I bought from Terry at SlideWright. It is nothing short of fantastic. Very easy to use and is very versatile. Highly recommended!  Also, Terry is a supporter of this site and is a great guy to do business with.

 

Writing this reminds me that I need to get some more of that Maplus Green. Great wax.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › What's the advantage of a ski specific vise?