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returning Derek Jeter's milestone baseball

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Christian Lopez, a 23-year-old from Highland Mills, N.Y., won the mad dash at Yankee Stadium on Saturday for Derek Jeter's 3,000 hit.  It was a home run landing near his seat in the left-field bleachers. Instead of selling the ball for perhaps as much as $250,000, Lopez returned it to Jeter in exchange for Yankee memorabilia and a half season of game tickets. "Mr. Jeter deserved it," Lopez said afterward. "I'm not going to take it away from him. Money's cool and all, but I'm 23 years old, I've got a lot of time to make that."

 

Lopez's classy gesture capped an afternoon when Jeter went 5-for-5 in a 5-4 victory over Tampa Bay and became the first Yankee to reach 3,000 career hits. The day was a feel-good reminder of the 37-year-old shortstop's dignity and dramatic flair in an era blemished by sham accomplishments.

 

Still, would you have done it? Would you have given Jeter the 3,000th ball back?popcorn.gif

post #2 of 8

No.  One day he'll regret it.

post #3 of 8

 

Quote:
No.  One day he'll regret it. 

 

 

And sooner rather than later. The IRS has announced they expect him to pay taxes on the value of the tickets and such given him by the Yankees.

post #4 of 8

I NEVER understood the allure of autographs that were given to other people.  Why would anybody want a memento that was intended to be a gift to someone else? I could understand if the guy wanted to keep the ball for himself.  I don't understand why someone else would want to purchase it other than Jeter.  Seems like a farce for anybody except the guy that caught the ball or Jeter to own it. I think it's great that Jeter got the ball back and big props for not selling it to some rich poser that had nothing to do with the event other than having more money that the people that really deserve to have it.

 

Seriously, if some celebrity that you really admire goes out of their way to autograph something for you you're a jerk if you sell it to someone else.  If you go out of your way to pretend to be a fan of accessible celebrities that you really aren't a fan of just so you can sell the autographed memorabilia you are a deuchbag for sucking up their bandwidth and wasting time they could spend making their real fans happy.

 

Now, charity auctions are a little bit different.  If someone chooses to donate memorabilia for a charity action that is OK because everyone is on the up and up about it.  Nobody's pretending to be a fan in order to sell an autograph and the rich person that purchases the item is helping those in need while doing so.

 

Fair deal all around for everyone in this case!icon14.gif

post #5 of 8

I saw that... total BS.  I'm all for raising taxes in general to balance the budget, but this kind of crap needs to stop.  Unless he actually sells an item or seats or whatever for money, having to pay taxes is ridiculous.  I feel the same way about inheritance / estate taxes.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmaie View Post

And sooner rather than later. The IRS has announced they expect him to pay taxes on the value of the tickets and such given him by the Yankees.



 

post #6 of 8

I'd just throw it back onto the field. It's his ball to do what he wishes. His adoration of millionaire ballplayers fueled his decision to not take care of himself. Imagine if that ballplayer would ever do the same for the public that pay so much of his salary and say he plays for the love of the sport and will let some salary go to improve the team .

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post

I'd just throw it back onto the field. It's his ball to do what he wishes. His adoration of millionaire ballplayers fueled his decision to not take care of himself. Imagine if that ballplayer would ever do the same for the public that pay so much of his salary and say he plays for the love of the sport and will let some salary go to improve the team .



I guess we'll see if Jeter coughs up enough cash to give the guy.  Jeter should give the guy enough cash to pay the taxes on the previous gift AND enough to also pay the taxes in the cash he gives him to pay the taxes. 

 

If they guy had won a contest instead of catching the ball the tickets and stuff received would be just as taxable in the eyes to those bastards at the IRS..

post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

Things are working out for Christian Lopez, the 23 y/o fan who caught the ball then selflessly gave it back to Jeter. Steiner Sports Collectables and Modell's Sporting Goods are donating $50,000 towards his $100,000 student loan debt. Miller High Life has pledged to pay any tax bills (~$15K) owed to the IRS for accepting free tickets and Jeter-signed memorabilia from the Yankees. And Topps is creating a new trading card for him - of him.

 

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I like that he gave the ball back, no charge.  The only thing that would have given me pause is the thought that Jeter makes enough salary in about one game to pay market value for it.  It's nice that sponsors are helping him with some of his bills.  Believe the kid comes from fairly well off family, pop is an eye doctor.  That probably had something to do with his altruism.  I wonder if Jeter will personally cherish that ball, or if it will go into a shoebox in the closeteek.gif  Wouldn't be surprised if Jeter, being the classy guy he is eventually donates it to the Hall or for display at Yankee Stadium?

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