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Skiing Myths and Misconceptions - Page 4

post #91 of 113

You can't become a good skier skiing in Michigan

post #92 of 113

-There's a correlation between number of lifts or trails and the quality of a ski area.

-Thicker socks will keep your feet warmer.

-It's safe to ski something if there are tracks on it.

-You're most likely to get injured on the last run of the day (maybe not really a myth, but the logic is skewed. Of course it's the last run. You got hurt).

-All great skiers are humble and don't have chips on their shoulders.


Edited by prickly - 9/5/11 at 12:32am
post #93 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhofstra View Post

You can't become a good skier skiing in Michigan


I think the movie Aspen Extreme dispelled that notion.  wink.gif 

post #94 of 113

This is a great thread!!!

post #95 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by robrg1836 View Post

This is a great thread!!!


So you really think this is a great thread, or it's a misconception that it's great?

 

post #96 of 113

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by robrg1836 View Post

This is a great thread!!!



 

 

 

 

Another misconception is that NBC is an acronym for the National Broadcasting Corporation.  After the last Winter Olympics NBC  now stands for: No Broadcasting Competence.

 

post #97 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by prosen View Post

Or that I am supposed to get out of the way just because some masshole is in a hurry.
 

 



Thank you for adopting the exact entitled, butthurt stance I'm talking about, as I was joking but the problem is very real!  Yes actually you ARE supposed to get out of the way, captain whineypants. 

 

jaytierny, that pic sums it up PERFECTLY.  If you aren't passing, get the hell out of the left lane.  Prosen, not sure why that would have evoked a defensive response other than you love to camp out in the fast lane.  Get real with yourself and ask "why should I be blocking faster-moving traffic?"  if the answer you come up with has anything to do with controlling what other people are doing, please kindly turn in your license.  Thanks. 

post #98 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

Misconception: Ski manufactures build skis for women. Fact: they build skis for light weight skiers and label and market some of them to women and label and market some of the same skis to light weight men.


Wrong. Some manufacturers re-engineer centers of curvature, mount points, bindings, ramp etc. Some don't, just new topsheets. Depends. 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

because a woman carries weight lower and has a different balance point (hips vs shoulders), the design for some women's skis shifts the waist of the ski (forward I believe). that would be a different design principal than making a ski that is simply lighter and softer flexing. women are definitely built differently than men, not always with less strength, however. 

 


Both men and women have their CG inside their anterior pelvic space, a cm or two diff between average male and average female. Women have more mass lower relatively, but again, not as much diff as we wannabe Michael Phelps males think. Men are not inverted pyramids, women are not upright pyramids. In absolute terms, which is what counts for the physical forces, men average same width hips as women, narrower shoulders than we estimate, and same total mass in legs. I would guess that leg height differences are more relevant to skiing than weight distribution. I know, hard on the stereotypes...wink.gif

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by prosen View Post

Or that I am supposed to get out of the way just because some masshole is in a hurry.
 

 

Actually, you are supposed to get out of the way if you're not along the edge, and not spend 20 minutes picking up your loose gear or trying to get your cool radio to work over the interference. Masshole is supposed to avoid you if he can, and if you're over by the trees, then it's his problem. 
 

 

post #99 of 113

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by beyond View Post

 

Both men and women have their CG inside their anterior pelvic space, a cm or two diff between average male and average female. Women have more mass lower relatively, but again, not as much diff as we wannabe Michael Phelps males think. Men are not inverted pyramids, women are not upright pyramids. In absolute terms, which is what counts for the physical forces, men average same width hips as women, narrower shoulders than we estimate, and same total mass in legs. I would guess that leg height differences are more relevant to skiing than weight distribution. I know, hard on the stereotypes...wink.gif

 

Wondering about my stereotyping, I looked some stuff up and it seems women's CoG is not only lower (most of the references I googled up stated it was an inch or more*) but perhaps more significantly, it's also farther anterior** which I expect makes a difference in turning skis.  The different CoG may or may not make a difference in other physical activities:

 

 

From:COMPARISON OF BIOMECHANICAL ASPECTS OF PERFORMANCE IN MALE AND FEMALE ATHLETES

Marion J.L. Alexander University of Manitoba

Quote:

It is often noted that the mean height of the center of gravity of a woman is lower than that of a man, giving females an advantage in balance sports

(Francis, 1988). However, this difference has been repotted to be about 2% of standing height, or about 1.3 inches for someone 5 feet 9 inches tall

which would not be a significant difference in terms of performance in most activities (Atwater, 1988).

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6731241

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18974715

 

So I don't discount the stereotype, it's just worth noting that, like all stereotypes, it can sometimes be misleading.  Same thing applies to women's boots - just like some women do best on men's boots some men do best in women's boots.  

 

*Of course that's just an average - there are tons of variations from things like leg length.  

** http://www.jeanniethoren.com/theory.html

post #100 of 113

Myths (I got nothing on state by state driving habits and relative CoM comparisons by gender).

 

1.  If you can ski East Coast Ice, you can ski anything

2. That New advances in ski design eliminate the usefulness of all older ski techniques

3. All little kids are fearless and take instantly to skiing.

 

post #101 of 113
Bob, nice point about COM, I tend to be fairly casual here about exact units. Meant inches. OTOH not sure why m/f diff would have more functional impact in skiing than say tennis. Can you unwrap that? My own experience is that main effect stems from COM interacting with knee inversion (f tendency for more angle between femur and tibia front to back. So more forward COM could put more load on posterior knee, more tension on acl. That will increaze risk for acl tears but not sure it will radically alter biomechanics of weight against ski. Hmm. But in any case we all know that if you can ski eastern ice you can ski anything. :-)
post #102 of 113

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Bob, nice point about COM, I tend to be fairly casual here about exact units. Meant inches. OTOH not sure why m/f diff would have more functional impact in skiing than say tennis. Can you unwrap that? My own experience is that main effect stems from COM interacting with knee inversion (f tendency for more angle between femur and tibia front to back. So more forward COM could put more load on posterior knee, more tension on acl. That will increaze risk for acl tears but not sure it will radically alter biomechanics of weight against ski. Hmm. But in any case we all know that if you can ski eastern ice you can ski anything. :-)


Well, I have no background in body mechanics.  I only decided to look up the stuff I cited because it seemed to me intuitively that (some/most) women have a different physique then (some/most) men and that different ski construction might favor people with a lower and more anterior CoM (<-better than CoG BTW).  Turned out there was some material on it.  

 

But intuitively it seems like tennis and most all ball/racquet sports are just so much different than a gravity sport like skiing.  Different forces, movements and motions, etc.  I don't play any ball sports seriously, other than volleyball wink.gif, so I don't think I could begin to parse the differences intelligently.  For instance, you pretty much lost me in the second part of your post.  There may be some similarities in the injuries, but the interaction between the body and the tools of the sport seems way different.  

 

And I think tennis and skiing are apples and oranges...but maybe that's a myth and misconception.

 

post #103 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

 

...And I think tennis and skiing are apples and oranges...but maybe that's a myth and misconception.

 



Since those are my two sports, I've been trying to figure this out. I don't know much about the body mechanics, though. The main difference, to me, is that you don't keep your feet flat on the ground in tennis. I mean, they aren't exactly "flat on the ground" in skiing, but sort of. Maybe you can adjust COM in tennis (or basketball, or soccer, or...) simply through your stance. You have to have weight forward, on toes, but how far is up to every individual.

post #104 of 113

Are there other sports where your feet are fixed into an aparatus? maybe ice skating. But if your feet are not fixed into a system, you deal with COM in every movement adjustment you make. The ski binding has to be pre-set in a then static position, therefore the issue of men's and women's position on the ski. They both have to find center, but may get there differently.

post #105 of 113

bicycling for one.... rollerblading/skating, wake boarding, water skiing..  just contributing....
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Are there other sports where your feet are fixed into an aparatus? maybe ice skating. But if your feet are not fixed into a system, you deal with COM in every movement adjustment you make. The ski binding has to be pre-set in a then static position, therefore the issue of men's and women's position on the ski. They both have to find center, but may get there differently.



 

post #106 of 113

Hahaha i love this thread.

post #107 of 113

It just occurred to me: The ski industry needs to invent and market a Woman Specific Ski Binding. This concept could make millions.

post #108 of 113

You're a little late - google women's+ski+bindings

 

Also introducing a women's AT/tech binding, the G3 Ruby.  

 

And there are some women's tele bindings.  

 

 

post #109 of 113

Myth:  I don't need lessons, I have been skiing for a couple of years now and I can get down blues and blacks just fine and ski them all the time.

 

Reality:  He can't ski bumps.  Freaks out if he see ice.  Heads for the lodge when it starts to snow.

 

Rick G

post #110 of 113

Wearing a cowboy hat makes you look rich and that your the best skier on the mountain.

 

Also, wacking your pole is overrated.

post #111 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiism View Post

Wearing a cowboy hat makes you look rich and that your the best skier on the mountain.

 

2x if you use a Ski Tote ! 

 

biggrin.gif

post #112 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post


You are stuck with NBC (Nothing But Crap) for Olympic coverage. (Pay for a lead out of another country or go to fromsport.com)

 

 


Thank goodness you whine about Olympic coverage in every thread you post in; I'm so relieved that you keep bringing it up, especially when mentioning it is completely out of context. We all know what a traumatizing blow it was for you to not get the Olympic coverage you desired, and you have rightly made it your crusade to disparage NBCs Olympic coverage in every thread you post in!

 

You don't at all seem like a neurotic malcontent, fight the good fight! You will win out, and become a much happier person, as soon as NBC folds due to your relentless posting on epicski about the failings of their Olympic coverage! Your pet peeve is so very interesting for us all!

 

 

 

 

Ski myth: one must pay for instruction to develop into an expert skier. rolleyes.gif

 

Ski myth: instructors are the best skiers on the hill. roflmao.gif

 

 


 

 

 

post #113 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post

Myth:  I don't need lessons, I have been skiing for a couple of years now and I can get down blues and blacks just fine and ski them all the time.

 

Reality:  He can't ski bumps.  Freaks out if he see ice.  Heads for the lodge when it starts to snow.

 

Rick G


Myth: A person without lessons can't ski bumps, freaks out if they see ice, and heads to the lodge when it starts to snow.

Reality: I had maybe three lessons when I was seven, but other than that I have been skiing for a couple of years and can ski bumps fine, don't mind the ice, and stay on the mountain when it snows. Much in part due to reading things on Epic and my over analytical mind that has me try all kinds of things and figure out what works on my own.
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