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Should I take that next step and do that next higher cert test? - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Thread Starter 

Here's an idea, visit PSIA-RM's web site and download the movement descriptors. Bob might even have a copy of the disqualifiers in a doc but I don't know if he's willing to post them here. The idea here isn't to simply read them, it's to use them as a framework for your training. Bring them up with your trainers, discuss them in detail with examiners outside of the testing events. In the test there are movement patterns to use and movement patterns to avoid using. Even during the so called free skiing segments. It's worth repeating the test is sort of a job interview, so show what you are going to teach, the same way you are going to teach it. That demonstrates disciplined focus on the prescribed objectives and the ability to deliberately ski multiple styles on demand. In other words you are showing everyone you are trainable and understand the objective of showing what your being asked to show.

post #32 of 41

 

Quote:
And that's the rub.  The outcome would have been different if the TD said that when you were having a bad day.

 

Maybe.  The TD also has seen me improve by leaps and bounds over the last couple years, so she may not have been as picky about little things.  Another one of our L3s saw the same thing the examiners did a week before I went, but at that point I'd already paid and wasn't about to try to retool everything I was doing.

 

Quote:
It still comes back to the idea that average performance is the key here. If you have a great day and perform very well, then the next day out on the hill you have a really bad day, do either represent your usual performance? It sounds like the clinician was pretty accurate because they were basing their advice on your performance over multiple days. It also sounds like the TD based their advice on a single day's performance. Did you fail by a lot or are you close to passing? What areas do you need to improve? What areas did you pass?

 

I felt like I gave a pretty average performance, despite tough and changing weather conditions (and a nasty wipeout in the morning on day 2 in a snowdrift).  I got consistent feedback from all three examiners -- close, but not there.  They don't officially score pass/fail on individual tasks, but they were all emphatic that I had some fundamental issues that were showing up in multiple tasks.  It wasn't like I was great on everything but bumps or something like that.

 

Quote:
I have a lot of fun with people who complain about "bad days" (myself included). When I've done video analysis and hear a "don't bother looking at that tape, I was skiing poorly that day" comment I've had 100% success doing side by side of that skiing with "good day" skiing and seeing the same fundamental movements (i.e. the stuff that gets you a pass or fail at an exam). It's really uncanny.

 

I'm not sure I would have agreed with this *before* I took this exam, but I do now.  The examiners were all picking out the same things, and it didn't seem to matter whether I felt I was doing well or poorly.

 

The short version of my problem (well, my most obvious one rolleyes.gif) is that I hesitate a little bit on my turn initiation -- or, alternatively, hang on to the end of the old turn too long.  Sometimes I'll even work in a tiny little pivot before I get onto the new edges.  It shows up most explicitly when I am skiing one-footed, or if I try to ski veeeeeery slowly while still making parallel turns, or in nasty bumps, but there's apparently enough of it there all the time for someone to see it if they're looking.

 

It's one of those annoyingly frustrating things where I know exactly what I'm doing wrong, and I know what I should be doing instead, but I haven't been able to change it consistently.  I've caught that inside edge and faceplanted so many times *trying* to fix it that I'm really hesitant to commit to the new turn above the fall line.

post #33 of 41

Had your alignment rechecked lately?

post #34 of 41
Thread Starter 

Matthias, you wrote about exact issues having been identified but a hesitation somewhere in the transition isn't a very specific description. Nor have you shared the prescribed changes they gave you. Care to share more details?

post #35 of 41

 

Quote:
Had your alignment rechecked lately?

 

I am reasonably sure this is not an equipment problem.

 

Quote:
Matthias, you wrote about exact issues having been identified but a hesitation somewhere in the transition isn't a very specific description. Nor have you shared the prescribed changes they gave you. Care to share more details?

 

I don't like to commit to the new inside edges above the fall line.  I'm not sure how to be more specific.  This seems to be more of a mental problem than a technical one at this point.

 

To avoid committing to the new inside edges early, I do a variety of things, usually some combination of delaying the transition to the new edges or slightly pivoting before engaging the new edges.  If I try to force it, I usually catch an edge.

 

I have a whole page of notes of stuff I discussed with the examiners, drills to try, etc.

 

I'm not really sure I want to spend my whole offseason dwelling on this.  I was hoping to offer some advice and perspective to other people on the exam process, not dissect my own issues -- at least right now.

post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

I'm not really sure I want to spend my whole offseason dwelling on this. 


I hear you! I never thought I'd say this, but I'm finding it nice to have an off season to embrace the beautiful sunny weather and become a bit more rounded outdoorsiness-wise.

post #37 of 41

Matt what we saw at Breck? I think you were putting the new outside ski on edge before the inside, stepping or pushing off the new outside ski?

 

So I've been teaching for three seasons now. The first season goal was to see if I liked teaching and improve my personal skiing, I did. I passed level 1 my second season and last season took a two day Movement Analysis Clinic as prerequisite for the Level 2. My skiing has changed dramatically in each of the last three years. I don't miss many opportunities to clinic.

 

Season three was the first time I felt in control and confident that I would get good results with beginning students. Sure I still had some students that didn't get out of the corral but my batting average went way up.

 

The discussion so far has been mostly about the skiing part of the test; if I should take the next step it would be the Level 2 exam. I'm really more concerned with preparing for the teaching and written part of the exam. What should I be doing this off season to prepare to do that next higher cert?

 

post #38 of 41

 

Quote:
Matt what we saw at Breck? I think you were putting the new outside ski on edge before the inside, stepping or pushing off the new outside ski?

 

Yeah, I probably do some of that too.  rolleyes.gif

post #39 of 41
Thread Starter 

Matt I wasn't prying and dwelling on that test isn't what I was suggesting. You seem to have a specific agenda as prescribed by the folks who have actually worked with you. That's what it takes to make meaningful and lasting change.

 

 

post #40 of 41

Not to derail the original thread, but here's a question, especially for the examiners.  If you have a candidate who comes with the attitude: "this is how I skied 10 years ago, this is how I ski today, this is how I'll ski in 10 years" vs "today I ski like this, but a month ago I skied like that, and next year I'll ski like THIS."  Do you try to ascertain the growth, and give extra credit to the candidates with the growth potential?  Just curious, because I think I may have received a slight "benefit of the doubt," and I worked my tail off in the time since to address it.  And I mean 'slight" - my examiner has the reputation of being one of the toughest in PSIA-W.

post #41 of 41
Thread Starter 

Sharing a little history isn't a bad thing but don't expect the chance to do each maneuver three different ways. After all you are there to show how well you can ski and teach to the current standard. That's a hard enough task for most. If asked to tweak what you're doing by all means do so but doing so in a prep clinic is probably when that would occur, not during a test.

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