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cross-training on inline skates - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




 

dude first you have no crediabilty, you know noone, and dont post stoke. Its going to be an uphill battle for you especially while attacking me. From metaphor post he is rollerblading down road, he is not I repeat going to be on ramps. Trust me on this, I have read his post prior to this one before and he is old person stuck in a younger person body to him the thought of ramps scares him. You on the other hand sound really hard core, much more than me. Maybe you can post up some rollerblading stoke?

 

I am not sure where I endorse standing on a MTBing? to pump.. yes, good luck pumping sitting down. So that was you that got his panties in a wad. I personally had totally forgotten about it. My point of counter pointing you was to tell people to stand up the entire ride is really bad advice, at the same time telling someone to sit down the entire ride is really bad advice. I am sure I never said to sit down the entire ride. I may have said learning to sit down while pedaling and learning to stay there is the fastest most efficient way of pedaling even on a Single Speed. I stand tons during rides to get around turns, go downhill, and to clear tech features, but I strive to sit down while pedaling so I can keep going longer and longer. I know work as a MTBing instructor so someone liked what I have to say about biking. Id say go get try to get a job teaching people to ride XC/trails and suggest they stand up all the time and see how far you get.

 

BTW I know this is thread drift, but I did not take it there. It cool you hate me Pdiddy but the deal is untill we see something from you, your hate is just hate with no substance to back it up. You could be an alias for all we know.


are you challenging me to a ski off.  lol!        

 

post #32 of 49

Hello everyone.  First off I’d like to comment on what a great resource this site has been to me over a number of years.  Thank you to those who have a wealth of knowledge and have been kind enough to share it with the likes of me.

 

This topic has finally convinced me to join-up and contribute to a debate because for some years now I have experienced the cross-over (and under) benefits of in-line skating in regard to skiing.  I’d categorise those benefits into 3 broad areas: physical fitness; movement patterns; and attitude.

 

Fitness

In my case, the primary key to physical fitness is motivation.  If, like me, gyms and exercise drills no longer float your boat then you need to find something that is going to be FUN.  So what works for me is, surprise-surprise seeing as I like skiing, something with movement that requires constant adjustment of my balance.  Activities like bike riding, skateboarding, in-line skating etc. all offer that potential. 

 

Additionally, I sometimes force myself to get up off my butt and go and skate, instead of surfing EPICSKI.com,  because I know it will also benefit my skiing.

 

 

Movement Patterns

  • Others have already mentioned the requirement to dial-in your fore-aft balance on in-lines.
  • Executing turns on skates down slopes of various pitch, width and degrees of smoothness and obstacles – where do you start?  Yes, I understand that the short running-length of urethane wheels on hard surfaces is not the same as a ski-edge on snow, but you can play around with: initiation, turn shape, transition, projection of your CM relative to the path of your skis (oops sorry - I meant skates); finishing your turns; keeping your upper body quiet; where you place your arms; extension turns; retraction turns; and the list goes on, and on, and on.
  • Practise your tuck down hills.
  • Executing jumps – you can mimic jumps on skis off bumps that are real or imaginary.
  • Keeping your skis on the snow in bumps – rolling into and over a small lip in a skate park can be a very painful experience if you don’t apply appropriate pressure to the front of your skates as you crest the lip/bump.
  • Skating uphill or across a flat area on skis – a bit obvious.
  • Skating in busy areas forces you to react to other objects – some stationary/some moving, some anticipated/some not! 

 

There are probably many others cross-over movement patterns between the two disciplines, but I’m not endeavouring to be exhaustive.  But as evidence of the cross-over benefits between in-line movements and skiing movements I can say that in my case, where I lack access to snow and ski terrain, I often go out and apply on in-line skates the ski-techniques/movement-patterns that I have read on this website.

 

 

Attitude

Because I know I have been practising the above movement patterns I am more confident when I do get the opportunity to ski - and when I experiment with technique it isn’t as daunting.  And because I am lucky enough to both skate and ski with friends and family, most of whom are way better skaters and skiers than I am and who don’t constantly critique technique, I have learnt that it is appropriate for the majority of the time to just relax and enjoy the ride.

 

 

Finally, for your amusement I’ve attached a link to a video of a skate-to-ski/shred night held a couple of years ago focusing on tight turns through single-slalom-poles.  It’s run once every few years and I’ve only tried it twice, but it was a lot of fun – so long as you avoided the sandbags!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRmM1hA4z54

post #33 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sk8tsnow View Post

Hello everyone.  First off I’d like to comment on what a great resource this site has been to me over a number of years.  Thank you to those who have a wealth of knowledge and have been kind enough to share it with the likes of me.

 

This topic has finally convinced me to join-up and contribute to a debate because for some years now I have experienced the cross-over (and under) benefits of in-line skating in regard to skiing.  I’d categorise those benefits into 3 broad areas: physical fitness; movement patterns; and attitude.

 

Fitness

In my case, the primary key to physical fitness is motivation.  If, like me, gyms and exercise drills no longer float your boat then you need to find something that is going to be FUN.  So what works for me is, surprise-surprise seeing as I like skiing, something with movement that requires constant adjustment of my balance.  Activities like bike riding, skateboarding, in-line skating etc. all offer that potential. 

 

Additionally, I sometimes force myself to get up off my butt and go and skate, instead of surfing EPICSKI.com,  because I know it will also benefit my skiing.

 

 

Movement Patterns

  • Others have already mentioned the requirement to dial-in your fore-aft balance on in-lines.
  • Executing turns on skates down slopes of various pitch, width and degrees of smoothness and obstacles – where do you start?  Yes, I understand that the short running-length of urethane wheels on hard surfaces is not the same as a ski-edge on snow, but you can play around with: initiation, turn shape, transition, projection of your CM relative to the path of your skis (oops sorry - I meant skates); finishing your turns; keeping your upper body quiet; where you place your arms; extension turns; retraction turns; and the list goes on, and on, and on.
  • Practise your tuck down hills.
  • Executing jumps – you can mimic jumps on skis off bumps that are real or imaginary.
  • Keeping your skis on the snow in bumps – rolling into and over a small lip in a skate park can be a very painful experience if you don’t apply appropriate pressure to the front of your skates as you crest the lip/bump.
  • Skating uphill or across a flat area on skis – a bit obvious.
  • Skating in busy areas forces you to react to other objects – some stationary/some moving, some anticipated/some not! 

 

There are probably many others cross-over movement patterns between the two disciplines, but I’m not endeavouring to be exhaustive.  But as evidence of the cross-over benefits between in-line movements and skiing movements I can say that in my case, where I lack access to snow and ski terrain, I often go out and apply on in-line skates the ski-techniques/movement-patterns that I have read on this website.

 

 

Attitude

Because I know I have been practising the above movement patterns I am more confident when I do get the opportunity to ski - and when I experiment with technique it isn’t as daunting.  And because I am lucky enough to both skate and ski with friends and family, most of whom are way better skaters and skiers than I am and who don’t constantly critique technique, I have learnt that it is appropriate for the majority of the time to just relax and enjoy the ride.

 

 

Finally, for your amusement I’ve attached a link to a video of a skate-to-ski/shred night held a couple of years ago focusing on tight turns through single-slalom-poles.  It’s run once every few years and I’ve only tried it twice, but it was a lot of fun – so long as you avoided the sandbags!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRmM1hA4z54


excellent information.  

 

post #34 of 49

Sadly, we seem to have lost the OP again. I doubt anyone here would offer skating as an exact replication of skiing. I think that was established in the original post. Is there still intrinsic value in skating as cross training? Sure. Is there also intrinsic value in MTB riding? Sure. Although both have their own downsides when it comes to learning for transfer. As a bike racer for many years I can tell you first hand without some flexibility training that too much biking can negatively affect our RoM, flexibility, and joint movement biases. The OTC doctors in Colorado Springs identified that problem decades ago and prescribed activities off the bike like plyometric RoM training, yoga and stretching, etc. As a figure skater (as a child) I would say balance and rotary skills were very important. So was explosive power for jumps and landings. I don't figure skate anymore but if you have ever tried to do a triple you know just how much power it takes to elevate enough to pull off that move. So nodays I do downhill slalom skating and uphill parallel training and IMO works well to compliment my other off season activities. Which again is why I am stressing that doing only one activity make for a very poor off season training program.

I would also like to mention that  even though Josh's friends (even if they are unidentified to this point) are very active bikers, they are also under the watchful eye of those US team folks and these coaches have always prescribed a wide range of activities for their athletes. Soccer, hockey (field and ice), weight training, plyometrics, purtubation balance training, the list is of options is quite extensive.

 

Cross training is about staying active instead of becoming a couch surfer in the off season. Finding what works best for you is what's important. Get outside and play, do what you enjoy doing, and have a fun off season.

post #35 of 49
Thread Starter 

Hi guys, 

 

Thanks for the variety of thoughts!

 

In Vancouver we have the most amazing skating path that follows the contour of the ocean/inlet. Every day I'm getting a 14km skate (~8.7 miles) on varied terrain - rollers, up hills, down hills, and of course flats. It's a great workout and hopefully good to keep the legs in ski shape. I've also found a great coach (who's also a CSIA level 3) who's given me a couple of lessons--and now I'm developing my underpush on crossovers and tight parallel turns (downhill type, not scissored). 

 

It's also interesting how different surfaces challenge your balance (asphalt, concrete, brick, pebbles, grass). 

 

And it's also nice to have found a sport that offers reasonably priced lessons. rolleyes.gif

 

BWPA, I will have to prove you wrong soon. Shouldn't be too hard as it seems the typical 30 year-old urbanite or suburbanite spends most of their free time on a couch in front of a TV. 


Edited by Metaphor_ - 7/3/11 at 9:10pm
post #36 of 49

 

Quote:
I do find it funny that you guys tell me to take the heal brake off....how am I suppose to stop then! ;)

Same as on ice skates.

post #37 of 49
Thread Starter 

a power slide? that's pretty advanced--and as my coach commented to me, good for tearing a ligament in your knee. 

 

Alternately there's a T-stop, or a spin stop, or lots of tiny carved turns to slow down, or a reverse t-stop, or "stepping" into a stop, or a grass stop, or a plow stop, or...

 

One question for cross-trained folks...

 

In skiing, we talk about lateral extension. One of the images we use is of a moving platform under our feet that we simply balance against. We've probably all heard some sort of expression that if you're having to fight or work the ski, you're not skiing right. Ideally your mass is just moving down the hill and your legs are coming around underneath to support your upper body, alternately extending from one side to the other with consistent pressure throughout each turn. 

 

In inline skating, you extend your leg outward and PUSH the skate to produce either forward momentum (as in stride 2) or turning (as in an a-frame, or a cross-over, or...). When you compare a strong lateral push during carved downhill skate turns to just turning through edging, you can see a real performance improvement. For example, I can slalom along a flat surface on inline skates. Or when I cross over, I pick up speed by pushing with each foot throughout the turn. However, in skiing, artificially creating pressure by pushing the skis is considered a no-no. I could not, I don't think, "parallel turn" my way across a flat from a near-stopped position on skis. And on a downhill course, pushing simply causes the ski to break away. So why does pushing work in inline skating, but not in skiing? Is it simply because of an inline skate's stiffness? If you were to ski on a super stiff ski with great sidecut, could you laterally push against the ski to drive the ski forward down the hill?


Edited by Metaphor_ - 7/4/11 at 12:39am
post #38 of 49

In addition to soft tissue damage, a "hockey stop" can be pretty hard on the skin if your body angle isn't steep enough, 'cause the wheels can lock up pretty fast. I only ever tried it on skates with four wheels set up rockered, I imagine it would be that much more difficult on speed skates.

 

Possibly pushing works on skates because they are short and the entire length is being used to produce thrust. With skis the tips and tails are too far from the foot to add thrust and are extra weight to carry. Could also help that skates on asphalt have zero slippage whereas on skis skating on a flat area there's definitely some.

 

 

 

 

post #39 of 49

A cross-training activity doesn't have to completely emulate your primary activity to be useful.  The whole idea of cross-training is to find an activity which has some similarities to the primary activity, but also has some differences so you add to your skill set.  (And don't confine yourself to technical items when you're looking for similarities and differences.)

 

Inline skating fits this pattern pretty well.  You can run down hills and practise turns that are reasonable approximations of simple carved turns.  Bring your poles with you if want to add some timing & co-ordination training.  I like to go inline skating in the fall for a little bit of skiing-oriented movement before getting on snow. We have a couple of graded parking lots nearby which are great for short pylon courses.

 

And you can use a regular skating stride, with long glides on a single skate for general balance training.  Skate backwards and do crossovers for more creative balance training.  This will be different than what you're doing when you're skiing, but your skiing-specific balance skills will still benefit.  Different muscle groups get used too.

 

post #40 of 49
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, 

 

Ok, I've had another month of training now on inline skates, and I have to say that it's an amazing hobby! 

 

For you guys out there who, like me, have developed on skis to the point they rarely get a "wow" moment of owning a new skill, you can get the feeling again on skates. I'm learning and owning new moves on a weekly basis now - just got the spin stop and mohawk turn under control. It's the best feeling when you can roll through AND feel stable doing it, knowing that a half hour earlier it seemed unachievable. 

post #41 of 49

Quote:

 

I do find it funny that you guys tell me to take the heal brake off....how am I suppose to stop then! ;)
Originally Posted by jmaie View Post

 

Same as on ice skates.

Hmm - probably would need a "heal" "break" after that.

 

I skate in a very hilly neighborhood. I use my heel brake only when I'm trying to learn to use it. I stop by turning. If I'm going very slow on flat ground (e.g. approaching a stop sign), I'll stop by forming a wedge just for fun. Using the brake there would be more efficient. But really, stopping is just over rated. At the end of my route, I just skate into the grass, down the hill, step up to the front door, step inside and take my skates off. I'd skate the down the driveway, but it's gravel.
 

 

post #42 of 49

Thanks for the update Met. I like reading about epiphanies and the excitement of exploring new things. I think you'll find the skills you learn will transfer quite well to your skiing this fall. Enjoy!

post #43 of 49
Thread Starter 

Another follow-up. I've bought some Fusion x5 skates and thanks to my coach, I've started learning some basic slalom skating moves. What is that? Check out this girl for an example: 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9_eEoJfDXU

 

She's awesome. If you can do slalom moves, I imagine it'll work wonders for your balance. Plus it feels so neat to learn new moves! Some moves definitely capture the sensations of skiing.

post #44 of 49

Here is another video I found a bit inspirational:

 

 

 

post #45 of 49

"Shitty skates are merely a ride with personality."

 

 

Guess you could say the same about skis.  ;-)

 

 

A few other excellent skating vids by this guy...

 

 

 


Edited by jc-ski - 7/29/13 at 3:13pm
post #46 of 49

This guy and his vids continue to amaze and inspire!

 

post #47 of 49
I been rollerblading this off season, I feel like its just good to get out and work those leg muscles. I used to agressive skate for years when I was younger. Since picking back up rollerblading ive noticed ive lost allot of my power in my legs to jump, spin, etc and that has to be affecting my skiing. Not to mention ive been having some serious leg fatigue while skiing so I just don't see how rollerblading can't be helping tremendously.
post #48 of 49

If you want to buy high quality of rollerski, you must look et these models of rollerskis: marve, elpex, swenor and skiathlon rollerski from rollerskiathlon. Some of these classic and skate models have composite frame.

post #49 of 49

Davidsons79:  Thank you for reviving this unknown to me thread.  This guy is frickin' amazing:

 

 

"Because running is for chumps..."

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