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80+ and still skiing?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

80+ and still skiing? If you're over 80 and still skiing I think a bunch of us would enjoy hearing what motivates you to keep skiing? What is your secret to continued physical and mental vigor? What adaptations have you made to age?  What is your proudest senior on-hill accomplishment?  What is your advice to us youngsters who may wish to emulate you?? If you're 70 something, you can chime in too.smile.gif

Thanks.

post #2 of 27

I'm 64 so  I need to shut up!

I feel as strong as ever & hope to still hit it hard at 80.

 

JamesJ has seen me ski and will probably agree I do rather well for

age 64.  Exercise year around helps ( I hit gym 3 days a week).

 

 

BTW you need to be 80 to get a free ticket at Alta. Someone who

is 100 from Hawaii shows up at Alta every year to ski. eek.gif

post #3 of 27

Well, my dad turned 88 this past ski season and is still going strong! He still skis because he can !

His days have gotten a bit shorter after his early eighties (used to be bell to bell). Now usually done by 2pm. Funny thing is that even now he is rarely the oldest guy we see on the hill.

 

Trick is to not slow down in life until life makes you.....

post #4 of 27

Hi James - I'm about to turn 87 and love to ski . I usually ski 30-40 days a season , divided among Summit County Colorado , Vermont , New Hampshire and Pa. I exercise 3 or 4 days a week at a local gym , and do a bit of local kayaking in Md. weekly .

 

Although I've maintained my skiing skills , I now ski mainly blues or easy blacks since my energy and stamina aren't what  they used to be . I 've ski patrolled for many years both here on the East Coast and in Colorado . Skiing continues to be a core part of my life .

 

I wish you many decades of skiing !

 

 

post #5 of 27

Rossi, I think that is awesome that he is still skiing never mind that it is only til' 2:00. Hope you enjoyed your Fathers Day yesterday. Even though you hate my Bruins, we absolutely agree on one thing, you hit it spot on about not slowing down until life makes you. Could not have said it better myself.  Cheers,   Dave

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

Well, my dad turned 88 this past ski season and is still going strong! He still skis because he can !

His days have gotten a bit shorter after his early eighties (used to be bell to bell). Now usually done by 2pm. Funny thing is that even now he is rarely the oldest guy we see on the hill.

 

Trick is to not slow down in life until life makes you.....



 

post #6 of 27
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldfool86 View Post

Hi James - I'm about to turn 87 and love to ski . I usually ski 30-40 days a season , divided among Summit County Colorado , Vermont , New Hampshire and Pa. I exercise 3 or 4 days a week at a local gym , and do a bit of local kayaking in Md. weekly .

 

Although I've maintained my skiing skills , I now ski mainly blues or easy blacks since my energy and stamina aren't what  they used to be . I 've ski patrolled for many years both here on the East Coast and in Colorado . Skiing continues to be a core part of my life .

 

I wish you many decades of skiing !

 

 


 

wow.gif

 

That's awesome and from my part of the Banana Belt!  Are you still ski patrolling?  When you travel large distances North or West do you ski alone or in a pack?
 

 

post #7 of 27

I patrolled locally for 20 years at Ski Liberty , but had  to give it up  because I had both knees replaced in 2000 , which together with my two hip replacements a couple years earlier made it risky to take loaded toboggans down the hill . I didn't want to put injured skiers at risk .

 

I pretty much like the freedom of skiing by myself so I do a lot of that . My son lives in Silverthorne , Co. where we ski mostly A Basin and Loveland . We ski a lot together ( so that he can look out for me ) . In New England , I usually drive up there and ski alone .

 

Think snow !

post #8 of 27
Thread Starter 

Here’s a link to a recent obit for a guy who was a competitive athlete beyond 100 years of age.  His life was ordinary until he retired, then he became extraordinary for remaining very physically active far longer than average.

 

http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/obituaries/articles/2011/06/22/roger_gentilhomme_athlete_who_continued_to_compete_after_hitting_100/?page=1

 

Summarizing his keys to active longevity:

1. Have passion(s).  His were tennis and family.

2. Matter to people.  It gives you a reason to keep living.

3. Stay busy, have goals and future plans.

4. Watch out for yourself.  If there's an irritation, fix it.

5. He was very engaged with his family and his wife died just a few years ago at age 94.

 

 

Bonus item, in case you missed it.  Bill Geist's March 2011 CBS video interview with 100 year old Michigan skier Lou Batori:

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7359508n

 

post #9 of 27



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post

 

 

 

Bonus item, in case you missed it.  Bill Geist's March 2011 CBS video interview with 100 year old Michigan skier Lou Batori:

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7359508n

 


Thank you Jamesj for this link.  I'm 3rd generation on skis. my uncle stop when he was 88 that was downhill and 93 for cross country.  Lou batori has now set the goal post..  I'm 58 I coach every weekend at wildcat mt in NH. 

 

Thank you again.   Hank
 

 

post #10 of 27

My dad told me that my grandfather was skiing all the way up to 83. I was really young when he passed though so I don't know how he was pulling that off. Maybe, he was just a tougher breed than most, but I have faith that there are some other people out there going just as strong as ever.

post #11 of 27

I want to regularly ski until I'm past 80. Kudos to those still skiing!

post #12 of 27

i'm turning 50 next yr and admittedly have been in a 'deep funk' for quite some time

knowing my abilities will only further go 'downhill' despite my attempts at fitness and such.

 

i realize genetics have a huge role on how old and how physically resilient you'll be

(watching fascinating 'discovery channel' on this subject).

 

i really appreciate reading this forum and have bookmarked it.

 

i've also purchased 'cycling past 50' by joe friel as i also enjoy cycling

...also hope to revisit skate skiing this yr too.

 

feel free to suggest any other inspiring links/books etc on how one can still get older

but avoid 'growing' old (that is where my head has been i sheepishly admit)

despite my 'signature' suggesting otherwise.

 

my sincere kudos of respect to those who, in the spirit of the late great jack lalane, still continue to make the most of what they have

post #13 of 27

Don't worry -- my mother-in-law is 72 and is bicycling in Hungary right now. She cross-country skis, snowshoes, kayaks, runs races...

 

She did run marathons but quit that a few years ago.  I don't know how many miles she bikes a day but it is a lot.

 

She had a really bad crash a couple years ago and shattered her wrist, cracked her pelvis, broke some ribs, and had road rash from head to toe, but recovered 110%.

 

As long as you are healthy I think as long as you keep active you're good.

 

One other item -- my Dad tried skiing for the first time at age 75 at Copper Mountain. He fell alot -- he just blamed his skis.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by canali View Post

i'm turning 50 next yr and admittedly have been in a 'deep funk' for quite some time

knowing my abilities will only further go 'downhill' despite my attempts at fitness and such.

 

i realize genetics have a huge role on how old and how physically resilient you'll be

(watching fascinating 'discovery channel' on this subject).

 

i really appreciate reading this forum and have bookmarked it.

 

i've also purchased 'cycling past 50' by joe friel as i also enjoy cycling

...also hope to revisit skate skiing this yr too.

 

feel free to suggest any other inspiring links/books etc on how one can still get older

but avoid 'growing' old (that is where my head has been i sheepishly admit)

despite my 'signature' suggesting otherwise.

 

my sincere kudos of respect to those who, in the spirit of the late great jack lalane, still continue to make the most of what they have



 

post #14 of 27

I was in clinic about 2 months ago, and I am reading the chart of the next consult - an 86 y/o referred for a lung nodule.  I am prepping for my "if this did turn out to be cancer do you want to treat it?" discussion (if you don't want to treat it why go through the pain/procedures to find out).  Walk into the room and ask the  fit, apparently mid 60ish guy sitting there - "Did your father step out to the bathroom?".  He promptly replied - "My father has been dead for 20 years, are you the doc?".  I apologized and in fairly short order discovered this guy is an active skier, has climbed every peak north of los angeles along the west coast in the last 7 years.  There is a saying/truism in medicine - "If you have seen one 4 year old you have seen you have seen most 4 year olds, if you have seen one 80 year old you have seen ONE 80 year old."

 

PS - His lung nodule is exceedingly likely to be an old scar - but we are going to check it again in several months


Edited by Alveolus - 9/24/11 at 6:31pm
post #15 of 27

One of my fellow instructors is 76 years old. He's an excellent skier and rips pretty hard, and he's an even better instructor. I'm happy when we work together. He has a youthful spring in his step and is in general 20 years younger than his age. He's but a kid, however, compared to one of the "wellness ambassadors" on my ski hill. This guy is 90something and you can tell he's no spring chicken. He still skies very nicely and rip/carves up the not so steep slopes, normally with a youngish 60something lady in tow, most often not the same lady two days in a row...

Riding the lift together with him and my fellow 76 years young collague is hilarious, as the oldest always calls him "kid" and I'm called "boychild".

post #16 of 27

I came across this forum while researching an article for Healthy Aging Magazine on the passion of skiing for 50 year olds on up.  The goal is to inspire people to keep skiing or to start skiing as an adult -- that it is never too late.  Looking for inspirtional quotes from skiiers who wish to share with others their passion for skiing and how it can be a lifelong sport.  If anyone would care to share a quote (suitable for printing!) with me, it would be great.  If you have a photo to include, that would be great too.

 

There are already a lot of really great thoughts here.   Let me know  if anyone would care to share for the article or if you have an idea of someone to feature. 

 

 

post #17 of 27
Thread Starter 

Age 50+ should be easy to snag a lot of feedback.smile.gif  There are many that post on this website that are well beyond that age that not only ski, but work full time on the slopes as ski professionals. 

I love this topic:  http://www.dcski.com/articles/view_article.php?article_id=753&mode=search

post #18 of 27

Geez, HealthyAging.  Most of us are 50+ here.  Take any quote you want.

post #19 of 27

Jim: I like your 10 tips!  What's the best way to speak to you directly?

post #20 of 27

What is the policy for using quotes for publication?  There are some great ones here.

post #21 of 27

I'm only 65 but expect to still be racing on my snowboard at 80.  If my knees hold up I'll be racing on my skis too.

 

Favorite quotes:

 

"If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

"When you're over the hill, you pick up speed"

post #22 of 27

Great quote!  We would love to use this...Please email me at editor@healthyaging.net with permission for Healthy Aging Magazine to use your quote in the article on passion of skiing and how it is a lifelong sport.  If you would care to have your name listed (age is optional), city, state (or just first name, city/state), please include that.  If you have a hi res photo, that would great too!  (Not to ask to much or anything!)

 

post #23 of 27

I'm 67 and got my PSIA level 1 certification 2 years ago, taught a bit that season and quite a bit last season but am going to work as a mountain host this year so I can concentrate on my level 2 certification and also spend more time at Bridger Bowl.  About 6 years ago I undertook learning to ski all over again except this time I didn't have a moron(me) for an instructor.  I now ski better than I ever have and am having more fun doing it.  I got over my fear of trees last year and my bump skiing improved a lot.  It just keeps getting better.  I bicycle, hike and backpack whenever I can in the off season, work out a bit with weights and eat a healthy diet.  I expect to be skiing until I can no longer walk, then maybe I'll get a sit ski.biggrin.gif

post #24 of 27

Have any of you guys watched ALL I CAN? Mid way through the video is some older folks skiing and ripping hard. I love it. Reminded me of my grandma... I'll be skiing the rest of my life Lord willing, even if I need to be in a sit ski.

 

post #25 of 27

All of you "seasoned veterans" are my heroes!  Hopefully I can manage to achieve some of what you're doing at that age.  Bravo.

post #26 of 27
Thread Starter 

Any new old timers want to chime in?  80+ and still skiing? If you're over 80 and still skiing I think a bunch of us would enjoy hearing what motivates you to keep skiing? What is your secret to continued physical and mental vigor? What adaptations have you made to age?  What is your proudest senior on-hill accomplishment?  What is your advice to us youngsters who may wish to emulate you?? If you're 70 something, you can chime in too.smile.gif

 

Also, update on Lou Batori, mentioned earlier in this thread.  He is still skiing, age 106 now!!

http://unofficialnetworks.com/2017/02/video-106-year-old-skier-still-making-turns-in-michigan

post #27 of 27

In June, 2013, a stroke took the life of my beloved uncle three days after his 89th birthday. He was getting dressed for another day of work at his law practice, just as he had for more than 65 years before that fateful day. Skiing remained one of his life-long, deep passions kindled on the precipitous slopes of Tuckerman Ravine beginning in the late 1930's. From an early age, hiking with him up the craggy slopes of Mt. Washington, that place became sacred ground for me as well. And I shed blood there a week after my thirteenth birthday. It was April 26, 1969, the day of the first Infero Race since Toni Matt's famous run in 1939 (http://newenglandskimuseum.org/remembering-toni-matt-and-the-1939-inferno/). The failure of a Marker Rotomat toe to roto snapped both right tib and fib. It brought my heel and knee into an unnatural alignment. But it made for a great story two weeks later at my Bar Mitzvoh.

Despite the inevitable passing of his contemporaries, my uncle would load gear into his SUV and drive the hour from Lewiston, Maine to Sunday River to make a few turns in the elegant style of Hannes Schneider, the father of the Alberg technique on this side of the Pond. 

Beginning about ten years prior to his final runs our family would head to Vail for a week. My uncle skied a solid five hours each day. As time passed, he did not shy away from his age, but embraced it. Indeed, being the old man on the mountain was a point of pride and he would scour the landscape in search of other men of a certain age. One year, when he in his mid 80's, my uncle spied another old fellow skiing a trail off the Northwoods lift. He appeared to be part of a group lesson. To confirm the fellow's status and age, my uncle instructed one of my cousins to ski down and inquire of the instructor, which he dutifully did. On his return, my cousin reported that the fellow was, indeed, 90 years of age, and a fine skier And while he was not a student in the lesson, his 28 year old girlfriend was. Poned. That experience has given me two goals to shoot for - subject, of course, to the approval of Ms. D1.


Edited by deliberate1 - 3/4/17 at 3:21pm
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