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More Jackson Hole Summer Skiing - The Great White Hump on June 4, 2011

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

It's funny how things turn out sometimes.

 

A group of us headed up Teton Pass last Saturday morning.  Our intent was to do a relatively easy-going tour over to Edelweiss Bowl to try to catch the morning corn.  Edelweiss involves skinning up a couple of pitches, skiing/skinning a lap or two on the bowl, and skinning back up to the car from the bottom of the bowl.

 

As we drove into the parking area at the top of the Pass, one of our party suddenly remembered that she had left her skins at home where they were drying from the day before.  That meant our only option would be to boot up Glory Peak instead of skinning over to Edelweiss, which is a considerably LESS easy-going option.  But at least we had options.

 

We all loaded up and did the boot, arriving at the top of Glory to cloudy skies and a hard wind.  For those of you without much spring-skiing experience, cloudy skies pretty much translate into a hard and frozen snow surface instead of the wonderful, just-starting-to-soften-in-the-sun magic that is good corn skiing.

 

As we stood around trying to decide what to do, another group headed down Glory Bowl.  We could hear their skis scraping on the snow surface long after we could see them, so we came up with another option.  We would ski/hike north from the top of Glory out to the Great White Hump.  From there, we could ski a long gladed ridgeline down to the west or perhaps ski east off the Hump itself.

 

It takes close to another hour to get to the Hump.  Along the way, the clouds simply vanished and by the time we reached the Hump we had a sky so blue you just wanted to rejoice.  

 

That blue sky meant the sun could start working on the east-facing slope below the Hump and THAT meant perfect corn.  Here's a very far-off photo of the Great White Hump.  Like many photos of the mountains, it's hard to get a feel for the scale involved.  Those cornices on the top of the Hump will show up in subsequent photos and you might appreciate the size of this snowfield:

 

IMG_1466.jpg

 

Here's part of the group walking up the south flank of the Hump:

 

IMG_0884.jpg

 

Here's my wife buttering a little freshly-cooked corn:

 

IMG_0912.jpg

 

Karen on the rollover.  The camera doesn't show it, of course, but this section is steeper than 45 degrees:

 

IMG_0996.jpg

 

Dave cruising down with one of those big cornices as a backdrop:

 

IMG_1051.jpg

 

A minor boot up out of that basin and onto the next ridgeline:

 

IMG_1076.jpg

 

Then Karen gets first dibs (other than the photographer) on the next pitch:

 

IMG_1123_2.jpg

 

But Dave finds the sweet spot:

 

IMG_1151.jpg

 

And finds it succulent indeed:

 

IMG_1157.jpg

 

Then powers through a little wet-slide avy debris on the next pitch:

 

IMG_1294.jpg

 

And Karen savors a post-corn stroll through a mountain meadow:

 

IMG_1414.jpg

 

Our easy-going morning turned into a fairly major tour, but it was well worth it.

 

 

post #2 of 18
Thread Starter 

And here's what I did after skiing...

 

IMG_0474.jpg

 

Hot times.  eek.gif

post #3 of 18

Wow, holy jumbo cornice. Looks very much worth the hike. I can feel how nice that corn is from here.

post #4 of 18
Unbelievable. That looks decadent.

Mike
post #5 of 18

AWESOME!  Didnt know they allowed burning of debris like that out there!  Here it's a major no-no.  No concern of Forest fires?

 

GREAT SKIING!!!!

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

Didnt know they allowed burning of debris like that out there!  Here it's a major no-no.  No concern of Forest fires?

 

 

We call them burn piles here and they're totally allowed.  We live in the county, but even in the town of Jackson you can burn at certain times of the year.

 

The rules are that you have to have a water source nearby (hence the hose in the photo) and you have to put the fire out by sundown - no overnight fires.

 

The county also asks that you call the fire dept dispatch ahead of time to let them know you're burning.  The reason for that is that because there IS such an awareness of forest fires here, people often call the county whenever they see smoke anywhere.  If the fire department gets a call about a fire, they first check to see if any civilians have called to report that they'll be burning brush in that area that day.

 

As we get later in the summer, they will sometimes institute a county-wide burn ban based on conditions.  

 

It's all very Wyoming, you know.

 

 

post #7 of 18

thanks, out here its also banned due to the polution it creates. Since NJ is so populated you can imagine the smoke generated each sporing and fall with all the leaf and brush fires!  We live is a very rural area but even with that, the fire departments would be getting quite the workout. 

post #8 of 18
Around here its township by township...luckily I live somewhere that allows me to embrace my inner arsonist...same rules as Bob describes.
post #9 of 18

icon14.gif Very nice Bob.

post #10 of 18

Excellent -- very envious!

 

post #11 of 18

I love summer skiing,,,

post #12 of 18

Great report Bob.  I take it nobody was keen to stand under the cornice to provide an up-close-and-personal perspective.  Damn, that's an impressive thing.  Having it 'hovering' over your shoulder must make for an interesting first few turns.  I do enjoy your reports.  Seems you won't have any trouble keeping the monthly ski run going this year.  How many months is that now?

 

'Hoping' to make it to Jackson in March next year if I can persuade a US-based friend (Silicon Valley) to trade Tahoe for Jackson Hole for a week.

post #13 of 18

What a year you've had so far, endless winter!

post #14 of 18


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

And here's what I did after skiing...

 

IMG_0474.jpg

 

Hot times.  eek.gif

Just call me "Pyromaniac Peters"  eek.gif
 

 

post #15 of 18

It's so wet now that it's hard to imagine anything catching from a brush fire that is monitored.  I was also burning that day, mine was a little more redneck.  I had a huge wad of rosin paper from a job I had just finished.  I live in a subdivision and have a lawn.  So I burned mine in an old wheelbarrow and dosed the parts that fell over the edge with the hose.  I used some dirty paint thinner as an accelerant.  The fire was bigger and hotter than I expected, but I didn't kill any grass.  I may need to repaint the wheelbarrow though.

 

 I love WY.

post #16 of 18
Yea, good ole WY. Growing up there, I always started our incinerator with Coleman fuel. My father transitioned to Coleman fuel to start the BBQ. It was exciting. The dog would always take a step back when he got the match out...

Guess that dog wasn't as stupid as I thought.

Mike
Edited by habacomike - 6/13/11 at 1:20pm
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

And here's what I did after skiing...

 

IMG_0474.jpg

 

Hot times.  eek.gif



Bob, you're my hero!  

 

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

And here's what I did after skiing...

 

IMG_0474.jpg

 

Hot times.  eek.gif



It's hard to tell, but it looks like those trees barely have buds on them, if any. Is that typical? Here in Niagara (Southern Ontario), it feels like it's been at least a month of foliage, and I'm thinking spring was a little late this year. My cherries are close to half size already!

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