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Loyalty: Ski Brands vs Ski Areas - Page 3

post #61 of 76

My loyalty has to be earned.  If your company makes crap ski bindings and fails to recall them when a known defective part brakes, forgetaboutit.  If I have 25 year old binding that still aren't broken and still function and have never had a problem with any of your companies bindings I will continue to buy from your company, even if your bindings now have too much plastic and too many moving parts (like all the rest). 

 

Also, things change.  Companies get bought and sold, the new owners may not value quality and honour as much as the previous owners.  Reputations only last so long, unfortunately longer than quality in some cases.

 

I used to have loyalty, based on brand name in various products, but things change.  Manufacturers were forced to compete with lower quality products or go out of busines.  Now it's up to the consumer to ascertain the quality of the product, you cannot rely on a brand name.

 

Ski Areas?  I like to mix it up.  Variety is the spice of life.  Given a choice, I will choose go to an area that I like and am well-treated at more often than other areas that are too crowded or where people are not so nice, or where terrain is too boring.  One surly employee can easily make me blacklist an area for decades.  I guess I'm just a sensitive guy.   Other than that, convenience counts (too far away = not going there very often).

post #62 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2meke View Post

Loyalty a manifestation of love?



This sounds right to me.  We love people who are not perfect, and even annoy us, yet the bond is undeniable.  We're loyal to those we love, or at least we should be.  We could love a ski area for a variety of reasons that have nothing to do with how great the place is to ski.  I live in Western Washington and have my entire life.  I've been to lot of places, many of them very wonderful, but there is no place else I love more or wish to live in.  My loyalty to my home ski areas is based on the fact that they are where I choose to live, they have decent skiing, and I have a long history with them.  It also has to do with the vibe.  They're personal places where I can feel at home.  In this way I "love" them.  I live close enough to Whistler to exhibit loyalty to the resort, but I don't feel any.  I don't like the Village or the commercialism of the place and the scale isn't personal.  I sure like to ski it, though!

 

To me loving a product is a bit of a stretch, but there is an underlying attachment that brings out a low level of loyalty in some.  Most of us have a different reason for brand "loyalty" which isn't the real thing.  It can be attachment to a feature, a look, a certain type of performance, or just plain laziness.  I myself exhibit what some would see as "loyalty" to Ford products.  It's not really loyalty however, they just make seats that allow me comfort for a very long time. No other manufacturer does this to my knowledge, so I stick with Ford.  If I find another company makes a vehicle that I like with a seat that supports my back like a Ford, then I'll take a very good look at it and out the window goes brand "loyalty."

post #63 of 76

Quote:

Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

 

To me loving a product is a bit of a stretch, but there is an underlying attachment that brings out a low level of loyalty in some.  

 

Most of us have a different reason for brand "loyalty" which isn't the real thing.  It can be attachment to a feature, a look, a certain type of performance, or just plain laziness.

 

I myself exhibit what some would see as "loyalty" to Ford products.  It's not really loyalty however, they just make seats that allow me comfort for a very long time. No other manufacturer does this to my knowledge, so I stick with Ford.  If I find another company makes a vehicle that I like with a seat that supports my back like a Ford, then I'll take a very good look at it and out the window goes brand "loyalty."


That's basically what "brand loyalty" is. Not a true loyalty in the sense of love, but more a convinience.

 

When a brand offers MOST of what a customer wants, aka, best compromise, there's a good chance to earn the "loyalty" of the customer. That is, the customer will automatically go to the brand without thinking. There maybe another brand offering similar product but that doesn't matter, the need of the customer is already fulfilled so the customer will look no further.
 

Does a ski brand offers that? Probably. Does a ski resort offers that? It depends. Out west, probably there're many that does and hence earn the loyalty of their customer. In the east, however, it's a bit harder to do due to the frickle nature of winter in the east. When you favorate resort is skunked and the neighboring one got a good dump, your loyalty is severely tested!

 

I have a lot of such "brand loyalty", mostly in products I don't have high expectation: paper towel for example! But skis? No. Ski resort? Not by a long stretch! Though to be honest, a lot of my "disloyalty" with any ski resort is the cost. When I'm paying $20/day, like in the Catskill Flex Days, I don't have as high an expectation, as long as they have snow covering much of their terrain. I don't care quite as much of the condition of the snow. But when I'm paying $50 or more, I want that snow to be some semblens of powder! I don't blindly pick a resort out of "loyalty" on that kind of outlay!

 

Obviously for people who got season pass, their loyalty FOR THAT YEAR is fixed. It's out of loyalty to their own wallet! ;-)

post #64 of 76

There is something to be said for having a spiritual connection to a mountain. Is it loyalty? I think it's something more like belonging to a church. Bridger Bowl is my cathedral. 

post #65 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigdog68 View Post

Having been a part of the "One Ski Quiver" thread I got to thinking about the fact that most people have bought skis from a wide array of manufacturers, myself included, and as such there is not to much loyalty to the brands. I've had Salomon's, Rossignols, and K2s, and although my Coombas are cock of the walk right now, who's to say that I wont fall in love with Dynastar or Fischer next? With the skis it seems that we all move around, brand to brand depending on what we like at the moment. That being said, I've only ever owned Lange Boots.

 

It also got me thinking about that fact that while going all over to ski is great, most of us hold one as our "home" weather or not we live there. I live in Florida, but if you ask me where I ski, the first thing out of my mouth is Squaw Valley. Sure, I have been to many many places, but I go to Squaw every year, and I am most at home with it, it's my home mountain, and I am loyal to her! I will defend her and proudly proclaim KT22 to be the best chairlift in the world, Sliverado is one of the best places to be in the world when the snow is falling, and that Chamois is one hell of a place to grab a beer and tell lies!  

 

I'm curious to know what you all think, and where everyone falls in this.



Magic skier 'till I die or they ban me.  It's just such a great place to ski on so many levels and the terrain expands every year- It feels like home on a level I've never experienced anywhere else...  But I'm not at all opposed to getting around.  For me, it's all about where the snow is, where the people are and how much money I have to work with- as I am one cheap-ass ski bum in the winter.  I'm more likely to head to the snow by way of touring if it's not at Magic, as Stowe etc. are fantastic mountains but are expensive as hell, yet the backside and surrounding peaks are socked with pow and FREE.  I'll ride lifts if I have a coupon, some kind of deal or an IN from a friend.  I also like places that are cheaper yet have the same snow- such as the VT Snow Bowl or the like.  Also I pretty much avoid the major resorts on the weekend as I HATE CROWDS above all else.  If I want to wait in lines, I'll stay home an go to the RMV, thanks.   

 

So basically I want a mountain to myself, socked in pow and on the cheap if not free...  And I spend almost all my time trying to maximize the fun and minimize the cost. 

post #66 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

There is something to be said for having a spiritual connection to a mountain. Is it loyalty? I think it's something more like belonging to a church. Bridger Bowl is my cathedral. 



I like that a lot!

 

post #67 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post





I like that a lot!

 



Makes me want to find BWPA's "Church of the Powder Day Saints" thread and bump it.  So appropriate and I agree 100% with Nolo. 

post #68 of 76

upon%20this%20rock%20i%20build%20my%20church.jpg

post #69 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDad View Post

upon%20this%20rock%20i%20build%20my%20church.jpg


Can I get an "Amen"...

 

post #70 of 76

Amen.  No matter how many amazing ski photos I see, I have yet to come across one that tops that.  Many others are more artistic and/or visually complex, but none come close to evoking the same response.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ske-Bum View Post


Can I get an "Amen"...

 



 

post #71 of 76

From wikipedia:

 

 

Quote:
He attended Montana State University in Bozeman where he honed his skiing skills at nearby Bridger Bowl before becoming a fixture of the extreme skiing scene...

He got religion here too. 

post #72 of 76

That doesn't surprise me.  If I had to use one word to describe Bridger Bowl, it would be Respect.

post #73 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Do Work View Post





Makes me want to find BWPA's "Church of the Powder Day Saints" thread and bump it.  So appropriate and I agree 100% with Nolo. 



Our father, who is not in alta
hallowed be thy glades
thy snowbird come
to wilbere done
on snow as if it were air
Give us this pow this daily pow
and for go our crashes
let us not forgive those who cut in the tram line
and lead us INTO temptation
but deliver us to top of hidden peak, AMEN!!

post #74 of 76

I am loyal to my brand of skies (Elan), boots (Lange), jackets (Kjus), pants (Kjus)....but when it comes to the mountain....I guess I am loyal to the area....

 

How can you stay on one mountain when you ski Tahoe....?  Just to many fun places...and very different skiing at each of them...Squaw, NorthStar, Sierra, Heavenly, Kirkwood, Alpine...  

 

If skiing around the Lake isn't Heaven, then Heaven is a special special place....

 

I am sure Colorado or Utah can give the same feeling, but man Tahoe is special...!beercheer.gif

 

 

post #75 of 76

Quote:

Originally Posted by parkmonkey View Post

How can you stay on one mountain when you ski Tahoe....?  Just to many fun places...and very different skiing at each of them...Squaw, NorthStar, Sierra, Heavenly, Kirkwood, Alpine...  

 

Speaking only for myself, I largely stay on one mountain because it's where my pass is.  I get to other mountains when my kids race at them.

post #76 of 76



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

Most of the posts in this thread about resorts deal with just that, resorts.  There is also another set of insanely loyal folks that are true to their local ski area.  It's interesting that it doesn't always make sense as to why this happens.  

 

An example is to compare the loyalty shown to the two ski areas I'm an ambassador for.  Both places have similar terrain.  Mt. Baker has more snowfall but Stevens Pass has plenty and its quality is usually better.  Stevens has more area that is taken up by blue groomers, but about an equal amount of advanced and expert terrain.

 

Mt. Baker has a wildly enthusiastic local following.  People wear their Mt. Baker T-shirt at all times of the year with pride.  Stickers are plastered on cars all over the region.  There is a community of ski and board bums in Glacier.  Season pass sales are brisk.  Loyalty is strong, and apparent.

 

Stevens Pass has many skiers that make it their home area but they are really mellow about it all.  I'm the only one I know of with a sticker on my cargo box (next to the Baker one).  I don't think I've ever seen anyone in a Stevens Pass T-shirt.  Skykomish has some folks who rent or own cabins, but no big, young ski bum community.  I'm sure they sell plenty of passes, but it doesn't seem to be a requirement to entry into an inner sanctum like it is at Baker.

 

Two roughly equal ski areas in the same region elicit completely different responses in the general population.  I find it strange

 

" Skykomish has some folks who rent or own cabins, but no big, young ski bum community. "

Wrong side of the mountains. Check out Leavenworth scene. Full year round ski/climber/kayaker bums.

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